Breast MRI at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital Detects Cancer Missed By Mammogram

Apr 17, 2001, 01:00 ET from Advocate Lutheran General Hospital

    CHICAGO, April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Sixty-year-old Helen Gibbons of Chicago
 was worried when one breast felt and looked different.  A mammogram and
 ultrasound did not show cancer, but Gibbons knew something was wrong.  She
 decided to undergo a breast MRI at the Parkside Magnetic Resonance Center,
 located at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge, Illinois.  "The
 MRI lit up the cancer like stars in the heavens," said Gibbons.  A biopsy
 confirmed a large tumor and Gibbons underwent a mastectomy.  "Breast MRI saved
 my life," said Gibbons.
     Magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful method of viewing inside the body
 that holds great promise in the fight against breast cancer.  Up to 15-percent
 of breast cancers are not seen on mammograms.  "MRI detects abnormal blood
 flow associated with cancer and can show breast cancer long before it can be
 seen on mammogram," said John Anastos, D.O., assistant medical director,
 Parkside MRI.
     Although not recommended as a routine screening test, Breast MRI can
 provide valuable information when a question arises on a mammogram or a lump
 is discovered on physical exam.  Unnecessary biopsies can be avoided because
 MRI can often distinguish benign lesions which can mimic breast cancer.
 Patients with dense breasts, implants, prior history of breast cancer or a
 family history of breast cancer also may benefit from MRI.
     "Breast imaging is the most significant application of MRI I've seen in
 the last six years.  It gives us another bullet in our gun to attack breast
 cancer," said John V. Phillips, M.D., medical director, Parkside MRI.
     For more information about breast MRI, contact Parkside MRI at
 847-696-7900.
 
 

SOURCE Advocate Lutheran General Hospital
    CHICAGO, April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Sixty-year-old Helen Gibbons of Chicago
 was worried when one breast felt and looked different.  A mammogram and
 ultrasound did not show cancer, but Gibbons knew something was wrong.  She
 decided to undergo a breast MRI at the Parkside Magnetic Resonance Center,
 located at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge, Illinois.  "The
 MRI lit up the cancer like stars in the heavens," said Gibbons.  A biopsy
 confirmed a large tumor and Gibbons underwent a mastectomy.  "Breast MRI saved
 my life," said Gibbons.
     Magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful method of viewing inside the body
 that holds great promise in the fight against breast cancer.  Up to 15-percent
 of breast cancers are not seen on mammograms.  "MRI detects abnormal blood
 flow associated with cancer and can show breast cancer long before it can be
 seen on mammogram," said John Anastos, D.O., assistant medical director,
 Parkside MRI.
     Although not recommended as a routine screening test, Breast MRI can
 provide valuable information when a question arises on a mammogram or a lump
 is discovered on physical exam.  Unnecessary biopsies can be avoided because
 MRI can often distinguish benign lesions which can mimic breast cancer.
 Patients with dense breasts, implants, prior history of breast cancer or a
 family history of breast cancer also may benefit from MRI.
     "Breast imaging is the most significant application of MRI I've seen in
 the last six years.  It gives us another bullet in our gun to attack breast
 cancer," said John V. Phillips, M.D., medical director, Parkside MRI.
     For more information about breast MRI, contact Parkside MRI at
 847-696-7900.
 
 SOURCE  Advocate Lutheran General Hospital