Bush Administration Plans to Release Rules Allowing Gravel Dredging In Wetlands, Continued Snowmobiling In Yellowstone, More Overflights of Grand Canyon, and 'Boundary Adjustments' for Drilling and Mining Near New National Monuments

But President Likely to Endorse Some Kind of Action on Global Warming



Apr 15, 2001, 01:00 ET from Newsweek

    NEW YORK, April 15 /PRNewswire/ -- Already being vilified as the most
 anti-environmental presidency since Ronald Reagan, the Bush administration
 plans to take additional actions that will raise environmentalists' ire
 further, the April 23 issue of Newsweek reports (on newsstands Monday, April
 16).  Among them are rules that would allow:  dredging for gravel in protected
 wetlands, the continued use of snowmobiles in Yellowstone, more noisy
 overflights of the Grand Canyon and "boundary adjustments" to allow drilling
 and mining near new national monument sites.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010415/HSSU001 )
     Then there's the energy plan, soon to emerge from a committee led by Vice
 President Dick Cheney.  Environmentalists expect it to stress production over
 conservation, reports Chief Political Correspondent Howard Fineman.  "The
 worst is to come," said Perry Plumart of the Audubon Society.
     Seeking to avoid political damage, Bush's political right hand, Karl Rove,
 points to a number of pro-environmental measures in the Bush budget, including
 an increase in funding for national parks.  Rove also explained why Bush was
 raising efficiency standards for central air conditioning units from a 10 SEER
 rating ("seasonal energy efficiency rating") to 12, lower than the 13 Bill
 Clinton proposed.  "Thirteen had huge cost implications," Rove says.  It would
 have driven companies out of business -- "an anti-competitive meltdown."
     Though the Bush administration abandoned the Kyoto global warming treaty,
 sources tell Newsweek that the president - prodded by Secretary of State Colin
 Powell -- is likely to find a way to endorse some kind of action on global
 warming.
 
                       (Read Newsweek's news releases at
               http://www.Newsweek.MSNBC.com/ Click "Pressroom")
 
 

SOURCE Newsweek
    NEW YORK, April 15 /PRNewswire/ -- Already being vilified as the most
 anti-environmental presidency since Ronald Reagan, the Bush administration
 plans to take additional actions that will raise environmentalists' ire
 further, the April 23 issue of Newsweek reports (on newsstands Monday, April
 16).  Among them are rules that would allow:  dredging for gravel in protected
 wetlands, the continued use of snowmobiles in Yellowstone, more noisy
 overflights of the Grand Canyon and "boundary adjustments" to allow drilling
 and mining near new national monument sites.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010415/HSSU001 )
     Then there's the energy plan, soon to emerge from a committee led by Vice
 President Dick Cheney.  Environmentalists expect it to stress production over
 conservation, reports Chief Political Correspondent Howard Fineman.  "The
 worst is to come," said Perry Plumart of the Audubon Society.
     Seeking to avoid political damage, Bush's political right hand, Karl Rove,
 points to a number of pro-environmental measures in the Bush budget, including
 an increase in funding for national parks.  Rove also explained why Bush was
 raising efficiency standards for central air conditioning units from a 10 SEER
 rating ("seasonal energy efficiency rating") to 12, lower than the 13 Bill
 Clinton proposed.  "Thirteen had huge cost implications," Rove says.  It would
 have driven companies out of business -- "an anti-competitive meltdown."
     Though the Bush administration abandoned the Kyoto global warming treaty,
 sources tell Newsweek that the president - prodded by Secretary of State Colin
 Powell -- is likely to find a way to endorse some kind of action on global
 warming.
 
                       (Read Newsweek's news releases at
               http://www.Newsweek.MSNBC.com/ Click "Pressroom")
 
 SOURCE  Newsweek