Bush Library Unveils Library Exhibit Honoring Former Soviet Leader Mikhail Gorbachev

Display Pays Tribute to the 2001 George Bush Award Recipient



Apr 10, 2001, 01:00 ET from George Bush Presidential Library

    COLLEGE STATION, Texas, April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- A rare look at the key
 relationship that helped end the Cold War without a shot went on display today
 as the George Bush Presidential Library unveiled a new exhibit to highlight
 the career of former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.  Featuring a world map
 given to Bush by Gorbachev at their historic 1989 Malta summit, recently
 declassified secret documents, and personal correspondence between the two
 leaders, the exhibit runs through May 15th.
     The special display was constructed in conjunction with the presentation
 of the 2001 George Bush Award for Excellence in Public Service.  Former
 President Bush will present the Award to Gorbachev, the eighth and last leader
 of the Soviet Union, at a dinner this Thursday, April 12th, at the Bush
 Library.  During his three-day visit to Texas A&M University, Gorbachev, 70,
 will also deliver the Wiley Lecture and tape interviews with Bush for a
 documentary he is narrating.
     "The fact that an American president would honor the leader of our former
 Cold War adversary in this way reflects the unique relationship George Bush
 and Mikhail Gorbachev developed in their three years of work as leaders of
 their respective countries and in dealing with historic issues that have
 strengthened national freedom and international peace," said Roman Popadiuk,
 executive director of the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation.  "The
 library exhibit was a natural extension of this prestigious award, and we look
 forward to making it a regular benefit for our visitors."
     The Bush Award/Gorbachev exhibit is also comprised of photos, state gifts
 given to Bush by Gorbachev, and the pen Bush used to sign the historic
 STrategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) with Gorbachev on July 31, 1991 in
 Moscow -- a 700-page agreement that, for the first time in the history of arms
 control, not just limited but reduced the number of strategic missile warheads
 both superpowers possessed by nearly one-third.
 
 

SOURCE George Bush Presidential Library
    COLLEGE STATION, Texas, April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- A rare look at the key
 relationship that helped end the Cold War without a shot went on display today
 as the George Bush Presidential Library unveiled a new exhibit to highlight
 the career of former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.  Featuring a world map
 given to Bush by Gorbachev at their historic 1989 Malta summit, recently
 declassified secret documents, and personal correspondence between the two
 leaders, the exhibit runs through May 15th.
     The special display was constructed in conjunction with the presentation
 of the 2001 George Bush Award for Excellence in Public Service.  Former
 President Bush will present the Award to Gorbachev, the eighth and last leader
 of the Soviet Union, at a dinner this Thursday, April 12th, at the Bush
 Library.  During his three-day visit to Texas A&M University, Gorbachev, 70,
 will also deliver the Wiley Lecture and tape interviews with Bush for a
 documentary he is narrating.
     "The fact that an American president would honor the leader of our former
 Cold War adversary in this way reflects the unique relationship George Bush
 and Mikhail Gorbachev developed in their three years of work as leaders of
 their respective countries and in dealing with historic issues that have
 strengthened national freedom and international peace," said Roman Popadiuk,
 executive director of the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation.  "The
 library exhibit was a natural extension of this prestigious award, and we look
 forward to making it a regular benefit for our visitors."
     The Bush Award/Gorbachev exhibit is also comprised of photos, state gifts
 given to Bush by Gorbachev, and the pen Bush used to sign the historic
 STrategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) with Gorbachev on July 31, 1991 in
 Moscow -- a 700-page agreement that, for the first time in the history of arms
 control, not just limited but reduced the number of strategic missile warheads
 both superpowers possessed by nearly one-third.
 
 SOURCE  George Bush Presidential Library