BusinessWeek Online Today: April 16, 2001

Apr 16, 2001, 01:00 ET from BusinessWeek Online

    NEW YORK, April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- The full version of the following
 articles are currently available on BusinessWeek Online's Daily Briefing
 (http://www.businessweek.com?c=prap16&n=link1&t=email)
 
     WASHINGTON WATCH: Lessons from Hainan Island
     By Richard S. Dunham
     Before George W. Bush became President, his foreign policy experience was
 limited to a single country: Mexico, just across the border from his home
 state of Texas. Now that the President seems to have headed off his first
 international mess, what conclusions can we draw about crisis management at
 the White House? Here are a few:
 
      -- Bush is one tough guy. For eight years, Bill Clinton wanted everybody
 in the international community, from Boris Yeltsin to Slobodan Milosevic, to
 like him. His successor doesn't mind if he gets some people a bit peeved.
 
      -- A manager, not a micromanager. In the post-crisis "spin" game, some
 White House officials portrayed Bush as a hands-on manager who took part in
 every decision for 11 days. That's a bit of an exaggeration. According to one
 senior official, he was "very good at setting direction," then "letting
 diplomacy work."
 
      -- Message discipline. The White House is fanatical about staying "on
 message." As soon as the situation developed on Hainan Island, the
 Administration contacted conservative groups to ask them to hold their fire.
 
     NEWS ANALYSIS: Why It's Still Safe at Home
     By Amey Stone
     Just as consumer spending and confidence have held up well during the
 slowdown, housing indicators show continued strength, albeit with some slowing
 from the highest levels of last year. The number of mortgage applications is
 down by just 2% this year, compared with the same period a year ago, but
 actually inched up the first week of April. And while sales of new
 single-family homes slipped 2.4% in February from January, the number sold
 -- 911,000 -- is still "very strong" by historical standards, according to the
 National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). The explanation for the continue
 strength of home sales is simple: Lower mortgage rates, which so far are
 offsetting the drag of lower consumer confidence.
 
     CAPTAINS OF INDUSTRY: Exploring Amazon
 http://www.businessweek.com/mediacenter/index.html ?c=prap16&n=link2&t=email
     Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos talks about the roots of the company, where it's
 going -- and when it's going to make money
 
     * RealPlayer or a compatible system is required to view this selection
 
 

SOURCE BusinessWeek Online
    NEW YORK, April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- The full version of the following
 articles are currently available on BusinessWeek Online's Daily Briefing
 (http://www.businessweek.com?c=prap16&n=link1&t=email)
 
     WASHINGTON WATCH: Lessons from Hainan Island
     By Richard S. Dunham
     Before George W. Bush became President, his foreign policy experience was
 limited to a single country: Mexico, just across the border from his home
 state of Texas. Now that the President seems to have headed off his first
 international mess, what conclusions can we draw about crisis management at
 the White House? Here are a few:
 
      -- Bush is one tough guy. For eight years, Bill Clinton wanted everybody
 in the international community, from Boris Yeltsin to Slobodan Milosevic, to
 like him. His successor doesn't mind if he gets some people a bit peeved.
 
      -- A manager, not a micromanager. In the post-crisis "spin" game, some
 White House officials portrayed Bush as a hands-on manager who took part in
 every decision for 11 days. That's a bit of an exaggeration. According to one
 senior official, he was "very good at setting direction," then "letting
 diplomacy work."
 
      -- Message discipline. The White House is fanatical about staying "on
 message." As soon as the situation developed on Hainan Island, the
 Administration contacted conservative groups to ask them to hold their fire.
 
     NEWS ANALYSIS: Why It's Still Safe at Home
     By Amey Stone
     Just as consumer spending and confidence have held up well during the
 slowdown, housing indicators show continued strength, albeit with some slowing
 from the highest levels of last year. The number of mortgage applications is
 down by just 2% this year, compared with the same period a year ago, but
 actually inched up the first week of April. And while sales of new
 single-family homes slipped 2.4% in February from January, the number sold
 -- 911,000 -- is still "very strong" by historical standards, according to the
 National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). The explanation for the continue
 strength of home sales is simple: Lower mortgage rates, which so far are
 offsetting the drag of lower consumer confidence.
 
     CAPTAINS OF INDUSTRY: Exploring Amazon
 http://www.businessweek.com/mediacenter/index.html ?c=prap16&n=link2&t=email
     Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos talks about the roots of the company, where it's
 going -- and when it's going to make money
 
     * RealPlayer or a compatible system is required to view this selection
 
 SOURCE  BusinessWeek Online