California Pistachio Commission: New Study Shows Pistachios Help Lower Cholesterol

Pistachios Can Be Part of Your Heart-Healthy Diet



Apr 02, 2001, 01:00 ET from California Pistachio Commission

    FRESNO, Calif., April 2 /PRNewswire/ -- There is good news for the
 millions of American nut-lovers who are concerned about their cholesterol
 levels.  Results from a new research study released at the 2001 Experimental
 Biology annual conference, found that eating two one-ounce servings of
 pistachios a day can help adults significantly lower their cholesterol levels.
 Pistachios join the ranks of other nuts by unveiling clinical data to show
 that if you have a moderately high total cholesterol level, greater than
 250mg/dl, the substitution of pistachios for other snack foods (20 percent of
 your caloric intake) can significantly lower your total cholesterol and LDL
 cholesterol levels by nearly 10 percent.
     This is important news for the approximately 40 million American adults
 who have total cholesterol levels above 240mg/dl, because high cholesterol
 levels are linked to an increased risk of heart disease, the single leading
 cause of death in America for both men and women.
     "This study helps debunk the myth that nuts cannot be a part of a
 heart-healthy eating plan," says Kathy McMahon, PhD, RD and nutrition
 consultant to the California Pistachio Commission.  "In fact, pistachios can
 fit well within dietary recommendations for heart-healthy eating, while
 delivering satisfying, great taste."
     The study, conducted at Inova Fairfax Hospital in Virginia, adds to the
 mounting body of scientific evidence that demonstrates switching to
 monounsaturated fat, without lowering total fat, can have positive health
 benefits.  Monounsaturated fats are found in food sources such as pistachios,
 avocados and olive oil.
     The current USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans stress consuming a diet
 that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol, but moderate, not low, in total
 fat.  In addition, the American Heart Association's most recent dietary
 recommendations stress making wise food choices and highlight nuts as part of
 a diet aimed at lowering cholesterol levels.
     "California pistachios are 'nutrition in a nutshell' and an excellent
 snack choice because they contain valuable nutrients," adds McMahon.  "So,
 when you are faced with the problem of how to easily change your diet to keep
 your cholesterol in check, don't shy away from a handful of pistachios."
     A one-ounce serving of pistachios (47 according to the USDA) is full of
 nutrients, containing more than 10 percent of the Daily Value for key
 nutrients like dietary fiber, vitamin B-6, thiamin, magnesium, phosphorus and
 copper.  Pistachios are also low in saturated fat and are cholesterol-free.
     Look for the California Pistachios service mark to ensure freshness and
 quality.  For more information and great recipes, visit www.pistachios.org .
 
     CONTACT:  Emlyn Saunders of Edelman Worldwide, 312-240-2827,
 emlyn.saunders@edelman.com ; Kathy McMahon, PhD, RD, 312-240-2653, both for
 California Pistachio Commission.
 
 

SOURCE California Pistachio Commission
    FRESNO, Calif., April 2 /PRNewswire/ -- There is good news for the
 millions of American nut-lovers who are concerned about their cholesterol
 levels.  Results from a new research study released at the 2001 Experimental
 Biology annual conference, found that eating two one-ounce servings of
 pistachios a day can help adults significantly lower their cholesterol levels.
 Pistachios join the ranks of other nuts by unveiling clinical data to show
 that if you have a moderately high total cholesterol level, greater than
 250mg/dl, the substitution of pistachios for other snack foods (20 percent of
 your caloric intake) can significantly lower your total cholesterol and LDL
 cholesterol levels by nearly 10 percent.
     This is important news for the approximately 40 million American adults
 who have total cholesterol levels above 240mg/dl, because high cholesterol
 levels are linked to an increased risk of heart disease, the single leading
 cause of death in America for both men and women.
     "This study helps debunk the myth that nuts cannot be a part of a
 heart-healthy eating plan," says Kathy McMahon, PhD, RD and nutrition
 consultant to the California Pistachio Commission.  "In fact, pistachios can
 fit well within dietary recommendations for heart-healthy eating, while
 delivering satisfying, great taste."
     The study, conducted at Inova Fairfax Hospital in Virginia, adds to the
 mounting body of scientific evidence that demonstrates switching to
 monounsaturated fat, without lowering total fat, can have positive health
 benefits.  Monounsaturated fats are found in food sources such as pistachios,
 avocados and olive oil.
     The current USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans stress consuming a diet
 that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol, but moderate, not low, in total
 fat.  In addition, the American Heart Association's most recent dietary
 recommendations stress making wise food choices and highlight nuts as part of
 a diet aimed at lowering cholesterol levels.
     "California pistachios are 'nutrition in a nutshell' and an excellent
 snack choice because they contain valuable nutrients," adds McMahon.  "So,
 when you are faced with the problem of how to easily change your diet to keep
 your cholesterol in check, don't shy away from a handful of pistachios."
     A one-ounce serving of pistachios (47 according to the USDA) is full of
 nutrients, containing more than 10 percent of the Daily Value for key
 nutrients like dietary fiber, vitamin B-6, thiamin, magnesium, phosphorus and
 copper.  Pistachios are also low in saturated fat and are cholesterol-free.
     Look for the California Pistachios service mark to ensure freshness and
 quality.  For more information and great recipes, visit www.pistachios.org .
 
     CONTACT:  Emlyn Saunders of Edelman Worldwide, 312-240-2827,
 emlyn.saunders@edelman.com ; Kathy McMahon, PhD, RD, 312-240-2653, both for
 California Pistachio Commission.
 
 SOURCE  California Pistachio Commission