'Can We Talk?' New AARP Report Looks at Parent-Adult Children Conversations On Aging and Living Independently

Apr 30, 2001, 01:00 ET from AARP Texas

    AUSTIN, Texas, April 30 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- Three
 quarters (75%) of adult children think about their parents' ability to live
 independently, but fully a third (32%) of these say they do not talk with
 their parents about it.  Similarly, seven in ten (69%) older parents say they
 think about their ability to live on their own, but more than a third of them
 (36%) say they do not talk with their adult children about what they will need
 as they age.  A new AARP report, "Can We Talk? -- Families Discuss Parents'
 Ability to Live Independently," combines findings from a two-part national
 telephone survey conducted in February, and sheds new light on the importance
 of -- and barriers to -- family conversations about the future.
     "This report shows that while most people say they are thinking and
 talking about this issue, a significant number are still avoiding the
 conversations that could help older family members live more independently in
 their later years," said Katie Sloan, director of AARP's Life Resources
 program.  "Most Americans want to stay independent as they age, and most adult
 children with older parents want to help.  But many families don't talk about
 the issue until a serious illness, financial setback, or other family crisis
 erupts."
     Three in ten (30%) adult children said they suspect their parents have
 needed help at some point, but have not asked for their children's help, Sloan
 noted.
     "Many people think they are adequately prepared, when in fact they may not
 be well prepared at all for unforeseen problems that their parents could
 encounter," Sloan said.  "Families should begin talking and planning now,
 while older parents are still young and healthy, because early planning opens
 a broader array of options later on."
     For example, Sloan said, more than two-thirds (67%) of adult children who
 do think about their parents getting older -- and half (50%) of older parents
 who think about their own aging -- say they think about how parents' aging
 will affect adult children.  But the two generations have differing opinions
 of how parents' aging will affect adult children.  More than half of adult
 children in this category (54%) say they predict their older parents will need
 to rely on them as they grow older, while only a quarter (27%) of older
 parents agree that they will need their children's help as they age.
     The new AARP report -- released as part of AARP's April 29-May 5
 Independent Living Week, a week-long series of events in communities around
 the nation aimed at helping older people continue living independently as they
 age -- is based on the findings of a two-part national telephone survey
 conducted from February 9 - March 4, 2001.  The data from adult children were
 collected from a nationally representative cross section of 1,431 adults
 between the ages of 30 to 64 who have at least one living parent age 65 years
 or older.  The data from older parents were also collected from a nationally
 representative cross section of 1,010 adults age 65 or older with at least one
 adult child between the ages of 30 and 64.
     For a free copy of AARP's publication, "Family Conversations that Help
 Parents Stay Independent (D17002)," write to AARP Fulfillment, 601 E Street,
 NW, Washington, DC, 20049.
     AARP is the nation's leading organization for people age 50 and older.  It
 serves their needs and interests through information and education, advocacy,
 and community services which are provided by a network of local chapters and
 experienced volunteers throughout the country.  The organization also offers
 members a wide range of special benefits and services, including the magazines
 Modern Maturity and My Generation and the monthly Bulletin.
 
     Contact:  Carole Barasch of AARP Texas, 512-480-9797
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X29565215
 
 

SOURCE AARP Texas
    AUSTIN, Texas, April 30 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- Three
 quarters (75%) of adult children think about their parents' ability to live
 independently, but fully a third (32%) of these say they do not talk with
 their parents about it.  Similarly, seven in ten (69%) older parents say they
 think about their ability to live on their own, but more than a third of them
 (36%) say they do not talk with their adult children about what they will need
 as they age.  A new AARP report, "Can We Talk? -- Families Discuss Parents'
 Ability to Live Independently," combines findings from a two-part national
 telephone survey conducted in February, and sheds new light on the importance
 of -- and barriers to -- family conversations about the future.
     "This report shows that while most people say they are thinking and
 talking about this issue, a significant number are still avoiding the
 conversations that could help older family members live more independently in
 their later years," said Katie Sloan, director of AARP's Life Resources
 program.  "Most Americans want to stay independent as they age, and most adult
 children with older parents want to help.  But many families don't talk about
 the issue until a serious illness, financial setback, or other family crisis
 erupts."
     Three in ten (30%) adult children said they suspect their parents have
 needed help at some point, but have not asked for their children's help, Sloan
 noted.
     "Many people think they are adequately prepared, when in fact they may not
 be well prepared at all for unforeseen problems that their parents could
 encounter," Sloan said.  "Families should begin talking and planning now,
 while older parents are still young and healthy, because early planning opens
 a broader array of options later on."
     For example, Sloan said, more than two-thirds (67%) of adult children who
 do think about their parents getting older -- and half (50%) of older parents
 who think about their own aging -- say they think about how parents' aging
 will affect adult children.  But the two generations have differing opinions
 of how parents' aging will affect adult children.  More than half of adult
 children in this category (54%) say they predict their older parents will need
 to rely on them as they grow older, while only a quarter (27%) of older
 parents agree that they will need their children's help as they age.
     The new AARP report -- released as part of AARP's April 29-May 5
 Independent Living Week, a week-long series of events in communities around
 the nation aimed at helping older people continue living independently as they
 age -- is based on the findings of a two-part national telephone survey
 conducted from February 9 - March 4, 2001.  The data from adult children were
 collected from a nationally representative cross section of 1,431 adults
 between the ages of 30 to 64 who have at least one living parent age 65 years
 or older.  The data from older parents were also collected from a nationally
 representative cross section of 1,010 adults age 65 or older with at least one
 adult child between the ages of 30 and 64.
     For a free copy of AARP's publication, "Family Conversations that Help
 Parents Stay Independent (D17002)," write to AARP Fulfillment, 601 E Street,
 NW, Washington, DC, 20049.
     AARP is the nation's leading organization for people age 50 and older.  It
 serves their needs and interests through information and education, advocacy,
 and community services which are provided by a network of local chapters and
 experienced volunteers throughout the country.  The organization also offers
 members a wide range of special benefits and services, including the magazines
 Modern Maturity and My Generation and the monthly Bulletin.
 
     Contact:  Carole Barasch of AARP Texas, 512-480-9797
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X29565215
 
 SOURCE  AARP Texas