CEOs in Marymount University Study of N. Va. Tech Companies Say Small Firms More Effective at Implementing Ethical Practices Than Big Companies

Forum Sponsored by Digital Focus's Digital University

to Explore Effects on Businesses



Majority of CEOs Also Say It Is OK to Monitor Employee Emails

But Not Phone Calls



Apr 30, 2001, 01:00 ET from Marymount University from ,Digital Focus

    ARLINGTON, Va., April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Smaller firms, those with
 100 employees or fewer, consider that they implement ethical practices more
 effectively than do companies of more than 500 employees, according to a new
 survey conducted by Marymount University of CEOs at Northern Virginia
 technology companies.
     Also among the findings: a majority of CEOs (57 percent) think that it is
 unethical to monitor employees' office phone conversations, but less than
 40 percent feel that it is unethical to monitor office e-mail.
     Forty-three CEOs responded to the Marymount survey.  They represent
 companies that vary in size from less than 100 employees to thousands of
 employees and reflect emphases in telecommunications, software development,
 and systems integration and consulting.  Marymount University and Digital
 Focus, a Herndon-based digital strategy and technology implementation company,
 are working together to develop a dialogue among CEOs of high-tech companies
 in the Washington, DC region on business ethics.  To determine the nature and
 range of these ethical concerns, Marymount conducted the survey.  Digital
 Focus's Digital University and Marymount will conduct a CEO Ethics Forum in
 May to discuss the findings further.
     Sr. Eymard Gallagher, RSHM, president of Marymount University, said, "The
 Ethics Forum is just the beginning of a long-term dialogue we hope to begin
 among local technology company CEOs.  If corporate CEOs grapple with these
 issues together, each company and the industry as a whole will benefit."
     An ongoing dialogue is also the aim of Steve Alexander, CEO of Digital
 Focus: "Rapid technological advances, a volatile market, and fast growth all
 bring to the surface interesting ethical dilemmas -- new twists on the
 traditional business culture and values.  And all companies should pay
 attention.  It affects the welfare of their team members and the bottom lines
 of their businesses."
     According to the study, more CEOs of small companies feel that:
 
     * Employees have control over decisions affecting them
 
     * Employees are honest in dealing with one another
 
     * A high level of trust exists in the organization
 
     * All members of the corporate community treat one another with respect
 
     * Work and personal lives are balanced
 
     * The employee turnover rate is at an acceptable level
 
     Overall, the survey showed that while CEOs view ethical practices as
 important, they stated that their firms were not able to institute such
 practices as effectively as desired.  Respondents said that they expect their
 organizations to do what is right, not just what is profitable.  In addition,
 they feel that their ethical image with clients is important.
     A number of CEOs participating in the survey expressed interest in
 attending the follow-up Ethics Forum in May to begin discussing ethical issues
 raised by the survey and confronted daily in their corporations.  Digital
 Focus's Digital University, in cooperation with Marymount University, is
 sponsoring the forum, at which an in-depth analysis of the survey will be
 presented.  Questions to be considered at the forum include:
 
     * Why are common practices such as monitoring e-mail viewed as ethical by
       some and not by others?
 
     * What can larger organizations do to improve trust and honesty among
       employees?
 
     * What is the relationship between ethical practices and employee loyalty
       and retention?
 
     * What is the relationship between ethical practices, and organizational
       performance and profitability?
 
     * What is the role of senior management in fostering ethical behaviors?
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X69347478
 
 

SOURCE Marymount University; Digital Focus
    ARLINGTON, Va., April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Smaller firms, those with
 100 employees or fewer, consider that they implement ethical practices more
 effectively than do companies of more than 500 employees, according to a new
 survey conducted by Marymount University of CEOs at Northern Virginia
 technology companies.
     Also among the findings: a majority of CEOs (57 percent) think that it is
 unethical to monitor employees' office phone conversations, but less than
 40 percent feel that it is unethical to monitor office e-mail.
     Forty-three CEOs responded to the Marymount survey.  They represent
 companies that vary in size from less than 100 employees to thousands of
 employees and reflect emphases in telecommunications, software development,
 and systems integration and consulting.  Marymount University and Digital
 Focus, a Herndon-based digital strategy and technology implementation company,
 are working together to develop a dialogue among CEOs of high-tech companies
 in the Washington, DC region on business ethics.  To determine the nature and
 range of these ethical concerns, Marymount conducted the survey.  Digital
 Focus's Digital University and Marymount will conduct a CEO Ethics Forum in
 May to discuss the findings further.
     Sr. Eymard Gallagher, RSHM, president of Marymount University, said, "The
 Ethics Forum is just the beginning of a long-term dialogue we hope to begin
 among local technology company CEOs.  If corporate CEOs grapple with these
 issues together, each company and the industry as a whole will benefit."
     An ongoing dialogue is also the aim of Steve Alexander, CEO of Digital
 Focus: "Rapid technological advances, a volatile market, and fast growth all
 bring to the surface interesting ethical dilemmas -- new twists on the
 traditional business culture and values.  And all companies should pay
 attention.  It affects the welfare of their team members and the bottom lines
 of their businesses."
     According to the study, more CEOs of small companies feel that:
 
     * Employees have control over decisions affecting them
 
     * Employees are honest in dealing with one another
 
     * A high level of trust exists in the organization
 
     * All members of the corporate community treat one another with respect
 
     * Work and personal lives are balanced
 
     * The employee turnover rate is at an acceptable level
 
     Overall, the survey showed that while CEOs view ethical practices as
 important, they stated that their firms were not able to institute such
 practices as effectively as desired.  Respondents said that they expect their
 organizations to do what is right, not just what is profitable.  In addition,
 they feel that their ethical image with clients is important.
     A number of CEOs participating in the survey expressed interest in
 attending the follow-up Ethics Forum in May to begin discussing ethical issues
 raised by the survey and confronted daily in their corporations.  Digital
 Focus's Digital University, in cooperation with Marymount University, is
 sponsoring the forum, at which an in-depth analysis of the survey will be
 presented.  Questions to be considered at the forum include:
 
     * Why are common practices such as monitoring e-mail viewed as ethical by
       some and not by others?
 
     * What can larger organizations do to improve trust and honesty among
       employees?
 
     * What is the relationship between ethical practices and employee loyalty
       and retention?
 
     * What is the relationship between ethical practices, and organizational
       performance and profitability?
 
     * What is the role of senior management in fostering ethical behaviors?
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X69347478
 
 SOURCE  Marymount University; Digital Focus