Chernobyl Legacy: Insightful Book Reveals True Heritage of Unprecedented Disaster

Apr 10, 2001, 01:00 ET from de.MO

    NEW YORK, April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- A publishing achievement of lasting
 significance, Chernobyl Legacy bears witness to the present-day effects of an
 horrific nuclear accident of unprecedented magnitude. Searing images
 documenting the effects following the Chernobyl disaster are central to the
 mission of this startling book, the work of noted photojournalist Paul Fusco
 of Magnum Photos and Magdalena Caris, developed and realized by designer and
 publisher Giorgio Baravalle of de.MO. As the story of Chernobyl Legacy
 unfolds, the book's demand for awareness is amplified by the commentary of
 United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan, actor Michael Douglas, Didier J.
 Cherpitel, Secretary General of the International Federation of Red Cross and
 Red Crescent Societies and United Nations delegates and leaders of
 international aid and relief organizations.
     The explosion of a nuclear reactor in Ukraine 15 years ago released enough
 radiation to be detectable across the entire northern hemisphere, damaging and
 destroying human lives, homes and land and creating further generations of
 innocent victims and environmental refugees in territories of Belarus, The
 Ukraine and Russia. In the foreword to Chernobyl Legacy, United Nations
 Secretary General Kofi Annan calls for an increased awareness of the needs of
 the seven million victims alive today, and for the prevention of future
 disasters. Kofi Annan writes: "Indeed, the legacy of Chernobyl will be with
 us, and with our descendants, for generations to come." Actor Michael Douglas,
 a United Nations Messenger for Peace appointed by Kofi Annan in 1998 whose
 father Kirk Douglas was born in Belarus remarks: "Now that I have a family of
 my own, I will never be able to safely take my children to my father's
 hometown in Belarus to discover and celebrate that part of our heritage."
     Paul Fusco was introduced to the story of the present-day effects of
 Chernobyl in 1997 through Magnum Photos. Fusco soon determined to document the
 Chernobyl story to the fullest extent in a photo essay from the heart of the
 affected regions today. With funding from Michael Douglas, Fusco visited care
 centers, orphanages and hospitals. He then turned to Adi Roche, founder and
 director of the Ireland-based Children of Chernobyl Project, who provided many
 introductions necessary to the realization of the project. In the course of an
 editing session for a United Nations project on human rights, Fusco met
 Giorgio Baravalle of de.MO, with its up-to-the-minute commitment to difficult
 projects and a clear focus on book development and realization. Chernobyl
 Legacy is the product of their resulting collaboration.
     "The next Chernobyl will be Chernobyl itself," writes Adi Roche, lamenting
 this devastating and largely unknown history. "May this book light a candle 15
 years after the Chernobyl disaster." Roche reminds the reader that the nuclear
 trail today is littered with stories of horror, and that more than 210 tons of
 uranium and plutonium are still buried inside the exploded reactor. "No people
 have ever before been continuously exposed to long-lived, man-made radiation,"
 she writes. While the ongoing threat to generations of the people of the
 Belarus region remains unacknowledged, and the people who are environmental
 refugees in their own lands go unnoticed and unaided, this book voices the
 statement that demands to be heard.
 
 

SOURCE de.MO
    NEW YORK, April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- A publishing achievement of lasting
 significance, Chernobyl Legacy bears witness to the present-day effects of an
 horrific nuclear accident of unprecedented magnitude. Searing images
 documenting the effects following the Chernobyl disaster are central to the
 mission of this startling book, the work of noted photojournalist Paul Fusco
 of Magnum Photos and Magdalena Caris, developed and realized by designer and
 publisher Giorgio Baravalle of de.MO. As the story of Chernobyl Legacy
 unfolds, the book's demand for awareness is amplified by the commentary of
 United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan, actor Michael Douglas, Didier J.
 Cherpitel, Secretary General of the International Federation of Red Cross and
 Red Crescent Societies and United Nations delegates and leaders of
 international aid and relief organizations.
     The explosion of a nuclear reactor in Ukraine 15 years ago released enough
 radiation to be detectable across the entire northern hemisphere, damaging and
 destroying human lives, homes and land and creating further generations of
 innocent victims and environmental refugees in territories of Belarus, The
 Ukraine and Russia. In the foreword to Chernobyl Legacy, United Nations
 Secretary General Kofi Annan calls for an increased awareness of the needs of
 the seven million victims alive today, and for the prevention of future
 disasters. Kofi Annan writes: "Indeed, the legacy of Chernobyl will be with
 us, and with our descendants, for generations to come." Actor Michael Douglas,
 a United Nations Messenger for Peace appointed by Kofi Annan in 1998 whose
 father Kirk Douglas was born in Belarus remarks: "Now that I have a family of
 my own, I will never be able to safely take my children to my father's
 hometown in Belarus to discover and celebrate that part of our heritage."
     Paul Fusco was introduced to the story of the present-day effects of
 Chernobyl in 1997 through Magnum Photos. Fusco soon determined to document the
 Chernobyl story to the fullest extent in a photo essay from the heart of the
 affected regions today. With funding from Michael Douglas, Fusco visited care
 centers, orphanages and hospitals. He then turned to Adi Roche, founder and
 director of the Ireland-based Children of Chernobyl Project, who provided many
 introductions necessary to the realization of the project. In the course of an
 editing session for a United Nations project on human rights, Fusco met
 Giorgio Baravalle of de.MO, with its up-to-the-minute commitment to difficult
 projects and a clear focus on book development and realization. Chernobyl
 Legacy is the product of their resulting collaboration.
     "The next Chernobyl will be Chernobyl itself," writes Adi Roche, lamenting
 this devastating and largely unknown history. "May this book light a candle 15
 years after the Chernobyl disaster." Roche reminds the reader that the nuclear
 trail today is littered with stories of horror, and that more than 210 tons of
 uranium and plutonium are still buried inside the exploded reactor. "No people
 have ever before been continuously exposed to long-lived, man-made radiation,"
 she writes. While the ongoing threat to generations of the people of the
 Belarus region remains unacknowledged, and the people who are environmental
 refugees in their own lands go unnoticed and unaided, this book voices the
 statement that demands to be heard.
 
 SOURCE  de.MO