Chris Eyre to Direct 'Indian Country: Native Americans in the 20th Century'

Jan 19, 2005, 00:00 ET from Katahdin Foundation

    LOS ANGELES, Jan. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Chris Eyre will direct "Indian
 Country:  Native Americans in the 20th Century," a four-part series to air on
 PBS television stations nationwide.  The "Indian Country" series is the
 follow-up to the acclaimed 1995 miniseries "500 Nations."  The new series will
 chronicle the history of Native American nations over the past 114 years, from
 the 1890 massacre of 300 Lakota at Wounded Knee to the present.
     Celebrated Native American director Chris Eyre is an enrolled member of
 the Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma.  Eyre's film "Smoke
 Signals" was the first feature film directed by a Native American to receive a
 national theatrical release and it won the Audience Award and the Filmmaker's
 Trophy at the Sundance Film Festival.  His other films include 2002's "Skins,"
 starring Graham Greene and Eric Schweig; the TV movies "Skinwalkers" (2002),
 "Edge of America" (2003) and "A Thief of Time" (2004); and 2005's "A Thousand
 Roads," a forty-minute widescreen film shown exclusively at the Smithsonian
 Institution's National Museum of the American Indian.
     Now in the research and development stage, "Indian Country" is a Katahdin
 Foundation production that will make extensive use of oral histories, research
 archives, and outreach to Native American scholars and community leaders.  The
 series will tell the story of how this land's original nations have survived
 and maintained their identities as sovereign peoples against all odds, and in
 the face of generations of loss and injustice.  While the common perception
 holds that Native peoples and their cultures were crushed in the bloody Indian
 Wars culminating in Wounded Knee in 1890, "Indian Country" will tell another
 story.  The series will show how Native American populations have grown
 eight-fold since Wounded Knee, how they are in the process of reviving their
 cultural traditions, preserving their languages, prospering in new enterprises
 and even occasionally forcing the U.S. government to uphold its treaties.
     The series, a tribute to the strength and persistence of the Native
 American nations, is aimed for national broadcast on public television, and
 for subsequent DVD and video distribution.  A companion book and soundtrack CD
 are also planned, as are extensive educational materials and teaching guides
 to support and accompany non-theatrical distribution.
 
 

SOURCE Katahdin Foundation
    LOS ANGELES, Jan. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Chris Eyre will direct "Indian
 Country:  Native Americans in the 20th Century," a four-part series to air on
 PBS television stations nationwide.  The "Indian Country" series is the
 follow-up to the acclaimed 1995 miniseries "500 Nations."  The new series will
 chronicle the history of Native American nations over the past 114 years, from
 the 1890 massacre of 300 Lakota at Wounded Knee to the present.
     Celebrated Native American director Chris Eyre is an enrolled member of
 the Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma.  Eyre's film "Smoke
 Signals" was the first feature film directed by a Native American to receive a
 national theatrical release and it won the Audience Award and the Filmmaker's
 Trophy at the Sundance Film Festival.  His other films include 2002's "Skins,"
 starring Graham Greene and Eric Schweig; the TV movies "Skinwalkers" (2002),
 "Edge of America" (2003) and "A Thief of Time" (2004); and 2005's "A Thousand
 Roads," a forty-minute widescreen film shown exclusively at the Smithsonian
 Institution's National Museum of the American Indian.
     Now in the research and development stage, "Indian Country" is a Katahdin
 Foundation production that will make extensive use of oral histories, research
 archives, and outreach to Native American scholars and community leaders.  The
 series will tell the story of how this land's original nations have survived
 and maintained their identities as sovereign peoples against all odds, and in
 the face of generations of loss and injustice.  While the common perception
 holds that Native peoples and their cultures were crushed in the bloody Indian
 Wars culminating in Wounded Knee in 1890, "Indian Country" will tell another
 story.  The series will show how Native American populations have grown
 eight-fold since Wounded Knee, how they are in the process of reviving their
 cultural traditions, preserving their languages, prospering in new enterprises
 and even occasionally forcing the U.S. government to uphold its treaties.
     The series, a tribute to the strength and persistence of the Native
 American nations, is aimed for national broadcast on public television, and
 for subsequent DVD and video distribution.  A companion book and soundtrack CD
 are also planned, as are extensive educational materials and teaching guides
 to support and accompany non-theatrical distribution.
 
 SOURCE  Katahdin Foundation