City of Detroit Cited by National Magazine For $17 Billion in Economic Growth Success

National magazine calls Mayor Archer the nation's "urban renewer"



Apr 03, 2001, 01:00 ET from City of Detroit

    DETROIT, April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Mayor Dennis W. Archer has been noted as
 the nation's "urban renewer" in a section titled "The Gurus of Growth."  The
 article appears in this week's edition of the New York-based BusinessWeek
 magazine.
     "Clearly, with nearly $13 billion of economic development activity
 occurring inside Detroit and another $4 billion on the drawing board, people
 are taking notice of the strides we are making as a city," said Mayor Dennis
 Archer.  "We've come a long way from the days of double-digit deficits and
 poor investment in our community.  We still have challenges to face, but as
 noted by BusinessWeek magazine, we are making long strides in the right
 direction."
     In the past, Detroit was often noted as the city with the most divestment
 of financial and human resources.  Local communities, in turn, practiced the
 politics of diminishing resources by concentrating most of their economic
 development efforts on luring one company from a neighboring community to
 theirs.  Opportunities for real growth were lost as local communities engaged
 in a shell game of simply moving one company and its tax base from one
 community to another.
     Another view emerged with the election of Mayor Dennis W. Archer and the
 economic polices of the federal government that encouraged businesses to look
 at cities as a new market of opportunities for economic growth.  Mayor Archer
 encouraged local leaders to work together to increase the total economic pie
 available to a metropolitan area by going after companies in a world market,
 not just the local one.
     Having companies move to Detroit is a chief priority for the city.
 However, if a new company moved to a neighboring suburb instead that would
 still benefit the city by giving it that second chance to acquire the
 employees and their families of that new company as homeowners, shoppers or
 visitors in case it did not move into the city.  The point is that the net
 effect of such actions would be to increase the total amount of human and
 financial investment in the region.  Recognition of the concept came fairly
 easy to a metropolitan area used to the global reach of the automotive
 industry.  Access to freeways and rail transportation systems, reuse of
 available industrial land, disposable income and affordable housing are all
 stronger selling points for the city and its surrounding communities.
     The result -- about $13 billion in economic development activity currently
 underway in the city of Detroit with another four or five on the drawing
 boards.  It runs the gamut from the nearly $500 million of investment by
 General Motors Corp. to relocate its headquarters and redevelop the city's
 riverfront to the $5 million development of the Livernois Square Shopping
 Plaza featuring small restaurants and offices, private investment in Detroit
 is occurring at an astounding rate fueled by consumer confidence.  The
 $100 million projects by GM and DaimlerChrysler AG capture the headlines.
 However, the private investment in Detroit is really being led by the growth
 of small and medium sized businesses as regular people take a chance, a second
 mortgage and a small business loan to make their dreams come true.  The result
 is notable as entire intersections are given new life with the renovation of
 gas stations, the opening of new laundry mats and the return of the once
 vanishing neighborhood drug store.
     Another sign of the city's positive efforts came to light with the latest
 census numbers showing that the city experienced the lowest decline in
 population loss since the 1960 Census.  Population figures for the City of
 Detroit pegs the city's population at 951,270, down 7.5 percent from the
 1,027,974 reported in the 1990 census when the city experienced a 14.6-percent
 drop from 1980.  In 1980 the city experienced a 20.5-percent drop in
 population from the 1970 census.  In 1970 it was a 9.3-percent drop and in
 1960 it was a 9.7-percent decline.
 
 

SOURCE City of Detroit
    DETROIT, April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Mayor Dennis W. Archer has been noted as
 the nation's "urban renewer" in a section titled "The Gurus of Growth."  The
 article appears in this week's edition of the New York-based BusinessWeek
 magazine.
     "Clearly, with nearly $13 billion of economic development activity
 occurring inside Detroit and another $4 billion on the drawing board, people
 are taking notice of the strides we are making as a city," said Mayor Dennis
 Archer.  "We've come a long way from the days of double-digit deficits and
 poor investment in our community.  We still have challenges to face, but as
 noted by BusinessWeek magazine, we are making long strides in the right
 direction."
     In the past, Detroit was often noted as the city with the most divestment
 of financial and human resources.  Local communities, in turn, practiced the
 politics of diminishing resources by concentrating most of their economic
 development efforts on luring one company from a neighboring community to
 theirs.  Opportunities for real growth were lost as local communities engaged
 in a shell game of simply moving one company and its tax base from one
 community to another.
     Another view emerged with the election of Mayor Dennis W. Archer and the
 economic polices of the federal government that encouraged businesses to look
 at cities as a new market of opportunities for economic growth.  Mayor Archer
 encouraged local leaders to work together to increase the total economic pie
 available to a metropolitan area by going after companies in a world market,
 not just the local one.
     Having companies move to Detroit is a chief priority for the city.
 However, if a new company moved to a neighboring suburb instead that would
 still benefit the city by giving it that second chance to acquire the
 employees and their families of that new company as homeowners, shoppers or
 visitors in case it did not move into the city.  The point is that the net
 effect of such actions would be to increase the total amount of human and
 financial investment in the region.  Recognition of the concept came fairly
 easy to a metropolitan area used to the global reach of the automotive
 industry.  Access to freeways and rail transportation systems, reuse of
 available industrial land, disposable income and affordable housing are all
 stronger selling points for the city and its surrounding communities.
     The result -- about $13 billion in economic development activity currently
 underway in the city of Detroit with another four or five on the drawing
 boards.  It runs the gamut from the nearly $500 million of investment by
 General Motors Corp. to relocate its headquarters and redevelop the city's
 riverfront to the $5 million development of the Livernois Square Shopping
 Plaza featuring small restaurants and offices, private investment in Detroit
 is occurring at an astounding rate fueled by consumer confidence.  The
 $100 million projects by GM and DaimlerChrysler AG capture the headlines.
 However, the private investment in Detroit is really being led by the growth
 of small and medium sized businesses as regular people take a chance, a second
 mortgage and a small business loan to make their dreams come true.  The result
 is notable as entire intersections are given new life with the renovation of
 gas stations, the opening of new laundry mats and the return of the once
 vanishing neighborhood drug store.
     Another sign of the city's positive efforts came to light with the latest
 census numbers showing that the city experienced the lowest decline in
 population loss since the 1960 Census.  Population figures for the City of
 Detroit pegs the city's population at 951,270, down 7.5 percent from the
 1,027,974 reported in the 1990 census when the city experienced a 14.6-percent
 drop from 1980.  In 1980 the city experienced a 20.5-percent drop in
 population from the 1970 census.  In 1970 it was a 9.3-percent drop and in
 1960 it was a 9.7-percent decline.
 
 SOURCE  City of Detroit