Cleveland Clinic Heart Surgeons First in Region to Use New, Smaller Heart Pump

Apr 23, 2001, 01:00 ET from Cleveland Clinic Foundation

    CLEVELAND, April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- Surgeons at
 the Cleveland Clinic Heart Center are the first in the Midwest to use a new
 heart pump that represents the next generation in ventricular assist devices
 and provides new hope for patients awaiting heart transplantation.
     This month, two patients awaiting heart transplantation at the Cleveland
 Clinic Heart Center received the MicroMed DeBakey VAD. The ventricular assist
 device was developed by pioneer heart surgeon Michael DeBakey and first
 implanted in June at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. The VAD is an
 investigational device used as part of a feasibility study overseen by the
 U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Cleveland Clinic Heart Center is one of
 three sites in the United States participating in the feasibility study.
     Patrick McCarthy, M.D., performed the surgeries on the patients, who are
 recuperating well. Dr. McCarthy is surgical director of the George M. and
 Linda H. Kaufman Center for Heart Failure at the Cleveland Clinic Heart
 Center.
     "This new generation device is significant for several reasons," Dr.
 McCarthy said. "It is much smaller than its predecessors.  It is quiet; it
 cannot be heard unless one is using a stethoscope. In addition, the risk of
 infection appears to be lower than with the earlier generation of devices.
     "Most striking is that flow through the pump, and the patients'
 circulation, is continuous. Therefore, patients have no pulse and special
 equipment is required to measure blood pressure," Dr. McCarthy said.
     More patients, including children who could not tolerate larger heart
 pumps now available, can receive this device.
     "I'm excited about the whole concept of a smaller pump," said James B.
 Young, M.D., head of the section of Heart Failure at the Cleveland Clinic
 Heart Center and medical director of the George M. and Linda H. Kaufman Center
 for Heart Failure. "This definitely signals a new era in pumps and heart
 assist devices."
     Dr. Young, a member of a new federal advisory committee to develop organ
 transplantation policy, said the device means new hope for people awaiting
 heart transplantation. More than 4,000 Americans are on the list of heart
 transplantation patients maintained by the United Network of Organ Sharing.
     "The smaller device buys time for people, including children, who now have
 a better chance to survive with support from the VAD until a donor heart is
 available," said Dr. Young.
     Approximately 5 million Americans have congestive heart failure. As the
 Baby Boomer population ages, an additional 400,000 people develop heart
 failure each year. For those with true end-stage congestive heart failure, a
 heart transplant is sometimes the only available treatment. The number of
 patients who need heart transplantation exceeds the number of appropriate
 donor hearts. That means more and more patients must be "bridged" to
 transplantation by use of a VAD.
     VADs help diseased or weakened hearts pump blood. The battery-powered
 portable devices supplement the main pumping chamber in the heart, the left
 ventricle. The device used in investigational studies at the Cleveland Clinic
 Heart Center weighs less than 4 ounces and is approximately one-tenth the size
 of most heart-assist devices now used.
     Dr. McCarthy completed his undergraduate work at the University of Notre
 Dame and his post-graduate work at Loyola University, Strich School of
 Medicine. He completed residencies in general surgery and thoracic surgery at
 the Mayo Clinic and did a special fellowship in cardiopulmonary
 transplantation at Stanford University Medical Center.
     Dr. Young received his bachelor's degree from the University of Kansas and
 his medical degree from Baylor College of Medicine.
     The Kaufman Center for Heart Failure was formed at the Cleveland Clinic
 Heart Center in 1998 with philanthropic support from George M. and Linda H.
 Kaufman of Norfolk, Va. The Kaufman Center for Heart Failure provides an
 integrated approach for patients with heart failure. That approach
 encompasses:
 
     *  Early recognition and prevention of heart failure,
     *  Medical therapy for the more common manifestations of heart failure,
     *  Surgical treatment for more advanced cases, and
     *  Mechanical support devices and heart transplantation for patients with
        end-stage heart failure.
 
     More than 24 research protocols are now in use at the Kaufman Center for
 Heart Failure to prevent and to treat heart failure.
     The Cleveland Clinic Heart Center is the recognized world leader in
 diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease. The Cleveland Clinic has
 been ranked number one in the nation for cardiac care by U.S. News & World
 Report since 1995. The Cleveland Clinic has been ranked among America's Ten
 Best Hospitals every year since 1990 by U.S. News & World Report.
     The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, founded in 1921, integrates clinical and
 hospital care with research and education in a private, non-profit group
 practice. Approximately 1,100 full-time salaried physicians at the Cleveland
 Clinic and Cleveland Clinic Florida, representing more than 100 medical
 specialties and subspecialties, provided care through more than 1.7 million
 outpatient visits and 50,000 hospital admissions in 1999 for patients from
 throughout the United States and more than 80 countries.
     With more than 3,000 available beds, the Cleveland Clinic Health System,
 formed in 1996, offers broad geographic coverage and a full continuum of high
 quality care. It includes The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland Clinic
 Florida, a multi-specialty group practice and hospital, and the Cleveland
 Clinic Children's Hospital for Rehabilitation. The Cleveland Clinic Health
 System also includes 10 respected community-based providers: Ashtabula County
 Medical Center and Euclid, Fairview, Grace, Hillcrest, Huron, Lakewood,
 Lutheran, Marymount and South Pointe hospitals.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X11323262
 
 

SOURCE Cleveland Clinic Foundation
    CLEVELAND, April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- Surgeons at
 the Cleveland Clinic Heart Center are the first in the Midwest to use a new
 heart pump that represents the next generation in ventricular assist devices
 and provides new hope for patients awaiting heart transplantation.
     This month, two patients awaiting heart transplantation at the Cleveland
 Clinic Heart Center received the MicroMed DeBakey VAD. The ventricular assist
 device was developed by pioneer heart surgeon Michael DeBakey and first
 implanted in June at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. The VAD is an
 investigational device used as part of a feasibility study overseen by the
 U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Cleveland Clinic Heart Center is one of
 three sites in the United States participating in the feasibility study.
     Patrick McCarthy, M.D., performed the surgeries on the patients, who are
 recuperating well. Dr. McCarthy is surgical director of the George M. and
 Linda H. Kaufman Center for Heart Failure at the Cleveland Clinic Heart
 Center.
     "This new generation device is significant for several reasons," Dr.
 McCarthy said. "It is much smaller than its predecessors.  It is quiet; it
 cannot be heard unless one is using a stethoscope. In addition, the risk of
 infection appears to be lower than with the earlier generation of devices.
     "Most striking is that flow through the pump, and the patients'
 circulation, is continuous. Therefore, patients have no pulse and special
 equipment is required to measure blood pressure," Dr. McCarthy said.
     More patients, including children who could not tolerate larger heart
 pumps now available, can receive this device.
     "I'm excited about the whole concept of a smaller pump," said James B.
 Young, M.D., head of the section of Heart Failure at the Cleveland Clinic
 Heart Center and medical director of the George M. and Linda H. Kaufman Center
 for Heart Failure. "This definitely signals a new era in pumps and heart
 assist devices."
     Dr. Young, a member of a new federal advisory committee to develop organ
 transplantation policy, said the device means new hope for people awaiting
 heart transplantation. More than 4,000 Americans are on the list of heart
 transplantation patients maintained by the United Network of Organ Sharing.
     "The smaller device buys time for people, including children, who now have
 a better chance to survive with support from the VAD until a donor heart is
 available," said Dr. Young.
     Approximately 5 million Americans have congestive heart failure. As the
 Baby Boomer population ages, an additional 400,000 people develop heart
 failure each year. For those with true end-stage congestive heart failure, a
 heart transplant is sometimes the only available treatment. The number of
 patients who need heart transplantation exceeds the number of appropriate
 donor hearts. That means more and more patients must be "bridged" to
 transplantation by use of a VAD.
     VADs help diseased or weakened hearts pump blood. The battery-powered
 portable devices supplement the main pumping chamber in the heart, the left
 ventricle. The device used in investigational studies at the Cleveland Clinic
 Heart Center weighs less than 4 ounces and is approximately one-tenth the size
 of most heart-assist devices now used.
     Dr. McCarthy completed his undergraduate work at the University of Notre
 Dame and his post-graduate work at Loyola University, Strich School of
 Medicine. He completed residencies in general surgery and thoracic surgery at
 the Mayo Clinic and did a special fellowship in cardiopulmonary
 transplantation at Stanford University Medical Center.
     Dr. Young received his bachelor's degree from the University of Kansas and
 his medical degree from Baylor College of Medicine.
     The Kaufman Center for Heart Failure was formed at the Cleveland Clinic
 Heart Center in 1998 with philanthropic support from George M. and Linda H.
 Kaufman of Norfolk, Va. The Kaufman Center for Heart Failure provides an
 integrated approach for patients with heart failure. That approach
 encompasses:
 
     *  Early recognition and prevention of heart failure,
     *  Medical therapy for the more common manifestations of heart failure,
     *  Surgical treatment for more advanced cases, and
     *  Mechanical support devices and heart transplantation for patients with
        end-stage heart failure.
 
     More than 24 research protocols are now in use at the Kaufman Center for
 Heart Failure to prevent and to treat heart failure.
     The Cleveland Clinic Heart Center is the recognized world leader in
 diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease. The Cleveland Clinic has
 been ranked number one in the nation for cardiac care by U.S. News & World
 Report since 1995. The Cleveland Clinic has been ranked among America's Ten
 Best Hospitals every year since 1990 by U.S. News & World Report.
     The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, founded in 1921, integrates clinical and
 hospital care with research and education in a private, non-profit group
 practice. Approximately 1,100 full-time salaried physicians at the Cleveland
 Clinic and Cleveland Clinic Florida, representing more than 100 medical
 specialties and subspecialties, provided care through more than 1.7 million
 outpatient visits and 50,000 hospital admissions in 1999 for patients from
 throughout the United States and more than 80 countries.
     With more than 3,000 available beds, the Cleveland Clinic Health System,
 formed in 1996, offers broad geographic coverage and a full continuum of high
 quality care. It includes The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland Clinic
 Florida, a multi-specialty group practice and hospital, and the Cleveland
 Clinic Children's Hospital for Rehabilitation. The Cleveland Clinic Health
 System also includes 10 respected community-based providers: Ashtabula County
 Medical Center and Euclid, Fairview, Grace, Hillcrest, Huron, Lakewood,
 Lutheran, Marymount and South Pointe hospitals.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X11323262
 
 SOURCE  Cleveland Clinic Foundation