Cleveland Hospital Offers Program to Put Disabled Children on the Playing Field

Apr 11, 2001, 01:00 ET from Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital for Rehabilitation

    CLEVELAND, April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- Millions of American children dream of
 matching the athletic achievements of star athletes like Michael Jordan or
 Mark McGwire. But for many, the simple act of participation in sports is in
 itself a victory.
     The CHAMPS program at the Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital for
 Rehabilitation gives children with chronic illnesses and disabilities the
 chance to engage in such activities as track and field, bowling, soccer, bocce
 ball and weight lifting.  The program uses special adaptive equipment to give
 these young athletes the opportunity to enjoy the same sports as their
 normally developing peers.
     "For the children we serve, participation in athletic and recreational
 activities should be just as much a part of life as they are for others," said
 Douglas Henry, M.D., a pediatric physiatrist (rehabilitation doctor) at the
 Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital for Rehabilitation and a co-founder of
 the CHAMPS program.  "Our mission is to maximize each child's potential for a
 life of health and functional independence, and we believe CHAMPS is an
 integral part of that process."
     The CHAMPS program acts as the Cleveland area chapter of the United States
 Cerebral Palsy Athletic Association (USCPAA), which serves children not only
 with cerebral palsy but also those with traumatic brain injuries and strokes.
 The USCPAA is one of five national organizations that offer local, regional,
 national and international athletic competitions for disabled athletes.
     CHAMPS athletes participate in twice-monthly training sessions held at the
 Mandell Jewish Community Center in Beachwood, Ohio.  The program offers
 numerous physical and psychological benefits to participants while also
 preparing them for organized disabled sports competitions around the state and
 around the country.
     As one of the few board-certified pediatric physiatrists in Ohio, Dr.
 Henry is uniquely qualified to work with disabled athletes.  He served as a
 team physician for the U.S. Paralympic track and field squad in Atlanta in
 1996, and filled a similar role earlier this year at the U.S.  Paralympic
 track and field time trials in New London, CT.
     The Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital for Rehabilitation is the
 region's premier provider of comprehensive pediatric, medical and
 rehabilitative services for children with chronic illnesses and disabilities
 (including those caused by trauma, birth defects, brain and spinal cord
 injury, and respiratory, orthopedic, neuromuscular and developmental
 disorders). Formerly known as Health Hill Hospital, the 52-bed, non-profit
 facility is a member of the Cleveland Clinic Health System. The institution is
 a two-time recipient of the prestigious "Accreditation with Commendation" from
 the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations.
 
 

SOURCE Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital for Rehabilitation
    CLEVELAND, April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- Millions of American children dream of
 matching the athletic achievements of star athletes like Michael Jordan or
 Mark McGwire. But for many, the simple act of participation in sports is in
 itself a victory.
     The CHAMPS program at the Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital for
 Rehabilitation gives children with chronic illnesses and disabilities the
 chance to engage in such activities as track and field, bowling, soccer, bocce
 ball and weight lifting.  The program uses special adaptive equipment to give
 these young athletes the opportunity to enjoy the same sports as their
 normally developing peers.
     "For the children we serve, participation in athletic and recreational
 activities should be just as much a part of life as they are for others," said
 Douglas Henry, M.D., a pediatric physiatrist (rehabilitation doctor) at the
 Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital for Rehabilitation and a co-founder of
 the CHAMPS program.  "Our mission is to maximize each child's potential for a
 life of health and functional independence, and we believe CHAMPS is an
 integral part of that process."
     The CHAMPS program acts as the Cleveland area chapter of the United States
 Cerebral Palsy Athletic Association (USCPAA), which serves children not only
 with cerebral palsy but also those with traumatic brain injuries and strokes.
 The USCPAA is one of five national organizations that offer local, regional,
 national and international athletic competitions for disabled athletes.
     CHAMPS athletes participate in twice-monthly training sessions held at the
 Mandell Jewish Community Center in Beachwood, Ohio.  The program offers
 numerous physical and psychological benefits to participants while also
 preparing them for organized disabled sports competitions around the state and
 around the country.
     As one of the few board-certified pediatric physiatrists in Ohio, Dr.
 Henry is uniquely qualified to work with disabled athletes.  He served as a
 team physician for the U.S. Paralympic track and field squad in Atlanta in
 1996, and filled a similar role earlier this year at the U.S.  Paralympic
 track and field time trials in New London, CT.
     The Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital for Rehabilitation is the
 region's premier provider of comprehensive pediatric, medical and
 rehabilitative services for children with chronic illnesses and disabilities
 (including those caused by trauma, birth defects, brain and spinal cord
 injury, and respiratory, orthopedic, neuromuscular and developmental
 disorders). Formerly known as Health Hill Hospital, the 52-bed, non-profit
 facility is a member of the Cleveland Clinic Health System. The institution is
 a two-time recipient of the prestigious "Accreditation with Commendation" from
 the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations.
 
 SOURCE  Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital for Rehabilitation