Clothes Washer Standard a Win for Consumers, Environment and Manufacturers

Finalized DOE Energy Efficiency Standard Signifies Substantial

Environmental, Consumer Savings



Apr 24, 2001, 01:00 ET from Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers

    WASHINGTON, April 24 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- After a 60
 day regulatory review, the Bush Administration affirmed a U.S. Department of
 Energy minimum energy efficiency standard for clothes washers which was
 finalized on January 12, 2001.  The rule was supported by a broad coalition of
 environmental organizations, state and regional energy officials and clothes
 washer manufacturers.  It also received the support of many consumers and
 consumer groups. The rule sets new efficiency targets for clothes washers
 manufactured after January 1, 2004.  The standard increases again in
 efficiency for units manufactured on or after January 1, 2007.
     Clothes washers manufactured to meet the 2004 standard will be 22 percent
 more efficient than today's baseline clothes washer.  Units that meet the 2007
 requirements will be 35 percent more efficient that today's baseline clothes
 washer.
     The new rule will result in a reduced demand for 4-5.5 quads of primary
 energy by 2030 and 11 trillion gallons of water. Also, this standard will
 eliminate the need for 15 power plants, as 60-95 million metric tons of future
 carbon emissions will be eliminated over the next 30 years because of reduced
 energy demand.  This equates to removing 4.1 million cars from the road.
 Consumer savings amount to $25.4 billion in energy bills or up to $100 per
 year for the average family.  By the year 2007, water savings in new efficient
 machines will amount to more than 7,000 gallons.
     Joseph M. McGuire, President of the Association of Home Appliance
 Manufacturers expressed support for the Administration's decision:
 "Manufacturers support the President's decision because the rule can now
 become final."
     "Some groups are attempting to gain attention by suggesting the rule will
 ban top-loading washers and require consumers to purchase expensive machines.
 Nothing could be further from the truth," said McGuire.  "There are already
 top-loading models in the market that meet or exceed the future standards and
 this industry's well-deserved reputation for innovation should assure
 consumers that new designs will increase the choices available in both top-
 and front-loading machines.  As for costs, history has shown consumer value
 has always outstripped consumer cost.  I don't expect that to change.
 Moreover, utility savings are still expected to exceed any projected product
 price increase."
     This rule has been subject to public notice and comment and 6 years of
 analysis and public meetings, which have included groups such as the American
 Association of Retired Persons (AARP), Consumer Federation of America (CFA)
 and utilities.
 
     The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) is a not-for-profit
 trade association representing manufacturers of major and portable home
 appliances, and suppliers to the industry and is headquartered in Washington,
 DC.  You can visit the AHAM Web site at http://www.aham.org .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X37050196
 
 

SOURCE Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers
    WASHINGTON, April 24 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- After a 60
 day regulatory review, the Bush Administration affirmed a U.S. Department of
 Energy minimum energy efficiency standard for clothes washers which was
 finalized on January 12, 2001.  The rule was supported by a broad coalition of
 environmental organizations, state and regional energy officials and clothes
 washer manufacturers.  It also received the support of many consumers and
 consumer groups. The rule sets new efficiency targets for clothes washers
 manufactured after January 1, 2004.  The standard increases again in
 efficiency for units manufactured on or after January 1, 2007.
     Clothes washers manufactured to meet the 2004 standard will be 22 percent
 more efficient than today's baseline clothes washer.  Units that meet the 2007
 requirements will be 35 percent more efficient that today's baseline clothes
 washer.
     The new rule will result in a reduced demand for 4-5.5 quads of primary
 energy by 2030 and 11 trillion gallons of water. Also, this standard will
 eliminate the need for 15 power plants, as 60-95 million metric tons of future
 carbon emissions will be eliminated over the next 30 years because of reduced
 energy demand.  This equates to removing 4.1 million cars from the road.
 Consumer savings amount to $25.4 billion in energy bills or up to $100 per
 year for the average family.  By the year 2007, water savings in new efficient
 machines will amount to more than 7,000 gallons.
     Joseph M. McGuire, President of the Association of Home Appliance
 Manufacturers expressed support for the Administration's decision:
 "Manufacturers support the President's decision because the rule can now
 become final."
     "Some groups are attempting to gain attention by suggesting the rule will
 ban top-loading washers and require consumers to purchase expensive machines.
 Nothing could be further from the truth," said McGuire.  "There are already
 top-loading models in the market that meet or exceed the future standards and
 this industry's well-deserved reputation for innovation should assure
 consumers that new designs will increase the choices available in both top-
 and front-loading machines.  As for costs, history has shown consumer value
 has always outstripped consumer cost.  I don't expect that to change.
 Moreover, utility savings are still expected to exceed any projected product
 price increase."
     This rule has been subject to public notice and comment and 6 years of
 analysis and public meetings, which have included groups such as the American
 Association of Retired Persons (AARP), Consumer Federation of America (CFA)
 and utilities.
 
     The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) is a not-for-profit
 trade association representing manufacturers of major and portable home
 appliances, and suppliers to the industry and is headquartered in Washington,
 DC.  You can visit the AHAM Web site at http://www.aham.org .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X37050196
 
 SOURCE  Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers