Command Trust Network: National Cancer Institute Study Finds Women With Breast Implants More Likely to Die From Diseases of Respiratory-Tract, Brain Cancer, Suicide

Largest Independent Study of its Kind Analyzes Nearly

8,000 Women With Breast Implants



Apr 24, 2001, 01:00 ET from Command Trust Foundation

    WASHINGTON, April 24 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- New findings
 from the largest independent study of women with breast implants, led by
 National Cancer Institute (NCI) researcher Dr. Louise Brinton, reveal the
 women suffer significantly higher rates of brain cancer and respiratory-tract
 cancer when compared to other female plastic surgery patients.  The rates also
 are higher when compared to the general population.
     In an article in the May 2001 issue of Epidemiology, Dr. Brinton's team
 reported that women with implants had a threefold higher relative risk of
 dying from diseases of the respiratory-tract including lung cancer, emphysema,
 and pneumonia and twofold higher risk of dying from brain cancer in comparison
 to the control group of other plastic-surgery patients.  The two groups were
 compared because they tend to come from the same economic and social
 backgrounds, thus neutralizing so-called "lifestyle" factors that have raised
 questions in other studies.
     According to a companion article published in the May issue of Annals of
 Epidemiology, which reported on the number of malignancies rather than
 mortalities, cancers of the brain and respiratory tract also were found at
 higher rates in women with implants.
     Other cancers such as cervical, vulvar and multiple mylenoma likewise
 occurred more frequently in women with implants than in the comparison groups,
 but the researchers described the results for brain and respiratory-tract
 cancer as more unexpected and puzzling.
     In trying to understand the high incidence of brain cancer, the
 researchers pointed out the many "neurologic alterations" that women with
 implants have reported -- memory loss, cognitive dysfunction, and others --
 and concluded that implants "may have been more directly involved" in those
 complications than has previously been suggested.  They also noted that these
 cancers originated in the brain as opposed to the more usual occurrence of
 spreading to the brain from another part of the body.
     In addition to respiratory-tract cancer, women with implants died at a
 higher rate from pneumonia and emphysema.  It is possible, the researchers
 suggested, that these deaths may therefore fit into a general pattern of
 pulmonary complications from exposure to silicone as reported in a number of
 other published cases in medical journals.
     On average the women were in their mid-30's when they received implants,
 and all the women had their implants for at least eight years.  The risk of
 mortality was increased among women who had their implants 15 years or longer.
 Nearly all previous studies of women with implants looked at the effects of
 devices over a shorter time period and did not most of the diseases included
 in these studies.
     The Brinton study was begun more than five years ago and is one of only a
 few studies to be carried out by an independent body like the National Cancer
 Institute.  Most previous investigations have been funded by breast implant
 manufacturers or others with a financial interest in the outcome.  This is
 also the first study ever to analyze the mortality rates of women with breast
 implants.
     Deaths from suicide also were found to be four times higher among women
 with implants.  The NCI researchers noted that low self-esteem, often a factor
 in suicide attempts, "may have also contributed to the excess suicides
 especially if the implants did not achieve the desired effect or if problems
 with the implants were encountered."
     Sybil Niden Goldrich, founder of the Command Trust Network, said she was
 disturbed by the findings but welcomed their publication.  "On top of the
 serious complications that are already known -- rupture, leakage, hardening --
 women need to know about these additional risks from breast implants.  This
 kind of quality research is long overdue.  It is unacceptable for women who
 are sick to have been forced to wait this long to get answers."
     Ms Goldrich has fought for more than a decade to inform women of the
 dangers related to breast implants and formed Command Trust Network as an
 information clearinghouse after she underwent multiple surgeries to correct
 complications related to her reconstruction following breast cancer and a
 double mastectomy.
     This study is part of a larger body of research being conducted at the
 National Cancer Institute.  The NCI is conducting the research to determine
 the long-term health effects associated with silicone breast implants.
 Although implants have been linked to serious short-term complications, very
 little is known about their long-term effects.
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X88582630
 
 

SOURCE Command Trust Foundation
    WASHINGTON, April 24 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- New findings
 from the largest independent study of women with breast implants, led by
 National Cancer Institute (NCI) researcher Dr. Louise Brinton, reveal the
 women suffer significantly higher rates of brain cancer and respiratory-tract
 cancer when compared to other female plastic surgery patients.  The rates also
 are higher when compared to the general population.
     In an article in the May 2001 issue of Epidemiology, Dr. Brinton's team
 reported that women with implants had a threefold higher relative risk of
 dying from diseases of the respiratory-tract including lung cancer, emphysema,
 and pneumonia and twofold higher risk of dying from brain cancer in comparison
 to the control group of other plastic-surgery patients.  The two groups were
 compared because they tend to come from the same economic and social
 backgrounds, thus neutralizing so-called "lifestyle" factors that have raised
 questions in other studies.
     According to a companion article published in the May issue of Annals of
 Epidemiology, which reported on the number of malignancies rather than
 mortalities, cancers of the brain and respiratory tract also were found at
 higher rates in women with implants.
     Other cancers such as cervical, vulvar and multiple mylenoma likewise
 occurred more frequently in women with implants than in the comparison groups,
 but the researchers described the results for brain and respiratory-tract
 cancer as more unexpected and puzzling.
     In trying to understand the high incidence of brain cancer, the
 researchers pointed out the many "neurologic alterations" that women with
 implants have reported -- memory loss, cognitive dysfunction, and others --
 and concluded that implants "may have been more directly involved" in those
 complications than has previously been suggested.  They also noted that these
 cancers originated in the brain as opposed to the more usual occurrence of
 spreading to the brain from another part of the body.
     In addition to respiratory-tract cancer, women with implants died at a
 higher rate from pneumonia and emphysema.  It is possible, the researchers
 suggested, that these deaths may therefore fit into a general pattern of
 pulmonary complications from exposure to silicone as reported in a number of
 other published cases in medical journals.
     On average the women were in their mid-30's when they received implants,
 and all the women had their implants for at least eight years.  The risk of
 mortality was increased among women who had their implants 15 years or longer.
 Nearly all previous studies of women with implants looked at the effects of
 devices over a shorter time period and did not most of the diseases included
 in these studies.
     The Brinton study was begun more than five years ago and is one of only a
 few studies to be carried out by an independent body like the National Cancer
 Institute.  Most previous investigations have been funded by breast implant
 manufacturers or others with a financial interest in the outcome.  This is
 also the first study ever to analyze the mortality rates of women with breast
 implants.
     Deaths from suicide also were found to be four times higher among women
 with implants.  The NCI researchers noted that low self-esteem, often a factor
 in suicide attempts, "may have also contributed to the excess suicides
 especially if the implants did not achieve the desired effect or if problems
 with the implants were encountered."
     Sybil Niden Goldrich, founder of the Command Trust Network, said she was
 disturbed by the findings but welcomed their publication.  "On top of the
 serious complications that are already known -- rupture, leakage, hardening --
 women need to know about these additional risks from breast implants.  This
 kind of quality research is long overdue.  It is unacceptable for women who
 are sick to have been forced to wait this long to get answers."
     Ms Goldrich has fought for more than a decade to inform women of the
 dangers related to breast implants and formed Command Trust Network as an
 information clearinghouse after she underwent multiple surgeries to correct
 complications related to her reconstruction following breast cancer and a
 double mastectomy.
     This study is part of a larger body of research being conducted at the
 National Cancer Institute.  The NCI is conducting the research to determine
 the long-term health effects associated with silicone breast implants.
 Although implants have been linked to serious short-term complications, very
 little is known about their long-term effects.
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X88582630
 
 SOURCE  Command Trust Foundation