Community to Celebrate First New Park In 20 Years

Shell Oil's Remediated Superfund Site Continues

Transformation Into Community Asset



Apr 19, 2001, 01:00 ET from Los Angeles County District 2 and Shell Oil Company

    LOS ANGELES, April 19 /PRNewswire/ -- What was once an environmentally
 impacted portion of a neighborhood in Los Angeles County will soon become one
 of its prized features.  An area south of the Del Amo Superfund site, where
 synthetic rubber was manufactured from the 1940s to the 1970s, will take yet
 another giant leap toward recovery on April 21, 2001, when ground is broken on
 this community's first new park in two decades.
     After years of working with the surrounding community, Los Angeles County
 Supervisor Yvonne Burke (District 2), Shell Oil Company and the State of
 California will officially break ground on a new, ten-acre community park on
 Saturday, April 21st from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon (the park is located in the
 South Bay area near the corner of Del Amo and New Hampshire Boulevards).  The
 celebration also breaks ground on a new chapter in the history of this once
 hotly contested environmental cleanup project.
     "For the first time in 20 years, my district will have a new park with
 state-of-the-art facilities -- this is something our community truly
 deserves," said LA County Supervisor Yvonne Burke.  "This park is a perfect
 example of how federal, state and local officials can work with private
 industry to create something beneficial to the community out of what was once
 a negative situation."
     The park will be built on a ten-acre parcel of land just to the south of
 the Del Amo Superfund site, which used to be a residential neighborhood that
 was bought out and cleaned up after contamination unrelated to the Del Amo
 site was discovered in the soil.  The concept of turning the land into a park
 was developed by a Community Advisory Panel involved in the Del Amo buy out.
 Construction will take approximately one year and an official name has yet to
 be determined.  Park features include a state-of-the-art Community Center that
 can serve as a day camp for school children, two soccer fields, two baseball
 diamonds, a basketball court, trails, benches and barbeques, and parking.
 Shell Oil paid more than $10 million to acquire the land and prepare it for a
 park site, and the State of California is providing $2-3 million in funds to
 complete the construction.
     Chuck Paine, Shell's project manager for the Del Amo Superfund site, said
 that while Shell was not associated with the contamination or required to buy
 out the neighborhood or build the park as part of the remediation of the
 adjacent Superfund site, the company wanted to add value to the community they
 have been involved with for over 50 years.
     "Decades ago we provided jobs and produced valuable products in this
 community," Paine said.  "We then fulfilled our responsibility to remediate
 the consequences of our production activities.  However, we believe that our
 responsibility to this community extends beyond cleaning up and going home.
 We have a duty to leave it better than we found it."
     Residents neighboring the park have received special invitations to join
 the celebration, which will include two live bands, a color guard presentation
 by the Junior ROTC, balloons, barbeque, and prizes for children.
 
     Looking Back, Moving Forward -- More About the Del Amo Superfund site
     Until 1994, the ten-acre plot where the new park is to be built featured
 nearly 50 residential homes, but after DDT -- a contamination not associated
 with Del Amo -- was detected in the area the residents were relocated.  For
 over three years, residents lived in temporary housing provided by the U.S.
 Government.  In order to expedite the clean up of the Del Amo Superfund site,
 Shell Oil Company offered to purchase the homes adjacent to the site and the
 U.S. Government paid for the soil remediation in the neighborhood where the
 DDT was discovered.
     Like many Superfund sites, the manufacturing facilities at Del Amo were
 built in 1942 to support the World War II effort.  The 280-acre operation
 consisted of a styrene plant run by Dow Chemical Company, a butadiene facility
 operated by Shell Oil, and a synthetic rubber operation managed by U.S. Rubber
 Company, Goodyear Tire & Rubber, and others.  In 1955, the U.S. Government
 sold off the manufacturing facilities to Shell Oil Company who continued
 production until 1971.  Most of the 280-acre site has since been developed
 into a commercial industrial park, while the ten acres to the south of the
 site will become a fully equipped community park.
 
 

SOURCE Los Angeles County District 2 and Shell Oil Company
    LOS ANGELES, April 19 /PRNewswire/ -- What was once an environmentally
 impacted portion of a neighborhood in Los Angeles County will soon become one
 of its prized features.  An area south of the Del Amo Superfund site, where
 synthetic rubber was manufactured from the 1940s to the 1970s, will take yet
 another giant leap toward recovery on April 21, 2001, when ground is broken on
 this community's first new park in two decades.
     After years of working with the surrounding community, Los Angeles County
 Supervisor Yvonne Burke (District 2), Shell Oil Company and the State of
 California will officially break ground on a new, ten-acre community park on
 Saturday, April 21st from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon (the park is located in the
 South Bay area near the corner of Del Amo and New Hampshire Boulevards).  The
 celebration also breaks ground on a new chapter in the history of this once
 hotly contested environmental cleanup project.
     "For the first time in 20 years, my district will have a new park with
 state-of-the-art facilities -- this is something our community truly
 deserves," said LA County Supervisor Yvonne Burke.  "This park is a perfect
 example of how federal, state and local officials can work with private
 industry to create something beneficial to the community out of what was once
 a negative situation."
     The park will be built on a ten-acre parcel of land just to the south of
 the Del Amo Superfund site, which used to be a residential neighborhood that
 was bought out and cleaned up after contamination unrelated to the Del Amo
 site was discovered in the soil.  The concept of turning the land into a park
 was developed by a Community Advisory Panel involved in the Del Amo buy out.
 Construction will take approximately one year and an official name has yet to
 be determined.  Park features include a state-of-the-art Community Center that
 can serve as a day camp for school children, two soccer fields, two baseball
 diamonds, a basketball court, trails, benches and barbeques, and parking.
 Shell Oil paid more than $10 million to acquire the land and prepare it for a
 park site, and the State of California is providing $2-3 million in funds to
 complete the construction.
     Chuck Paine, Shell's project manager for the Del Amo Superfund site, said
 that while Shell was not associated with the contamination or required to buy
 out the neighborhood or build the park as part of the remediation of the
 adjacent Superfund site, the company wanted to add value to the community they
 have been involved with for over 50 years.
     "Decades ago we provided jobs and produced valuable products in this
 community," Paine said.  "We then fulfilled our responsibility to remediate
 the consequences of our production activities.  However, we believe that our
 responsibility to this community extends beyond cleaning up and going home.
 We have a duty to leave it better than we found it."
     Residents neighboring the park have received special invitations to join
 the celebration, which will include two live bands, a color guard presentation
 by the Junior ROTC, balloons, barbeque, and prizes for children.
 
     Looking Back, Moving Forward -- More About the Del Amo Superfund site
     Until 1994, the ten-acre plot where the new park is to be built featured
 nearly 50 residential homes, but after DDT -- a contamination not associated
 with Del Amo -- was detected in the area the residents were relocated.  For
 over three years, residents lived in temporary housing provided by the U.S.
 Government.  In order to expedite the clean up of the Del Amo Superfund site,
 Shell Oil Company offered to purchase the homes adjacent to the site and the
 U.S. Government paid for the soil remediation in the neighborhood where the
 DDT was discovered.
     Like many Superfund sites, the manufacturing facilities at Del Amo were
 built in 1942 to support the World War II effort.  The 280-acre operation
 consisted of a styrene plant run by Dow Chemical Company, a butadiene facility
 operated by Shell Oil, and a synthetic rubber operation managed by U.S. Rubber
 Company, Goodyear Tire & Rubber, and others.  In 1955, the U.S. Government
 sold off the manufacturing facilities to Shell Oil Company who continued
 production until 1971.  Most of the 280-acre site has since been developed
 into a commercial industrial park, while the ten acres to the south of the
 site will become a fully equipped community park.
 
 SOURCE  Los Angeles County District 2 and Shell Oil Company

RELATED LINKS

http://www.shellus.com