Conservation Critical During California Energy Crisis

Apr 10, 2001, 01:00 ET from Guardian Glass Tinting

    LOS ANGELES, April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- With Governor Gray Davis announcing
 electrical rate hikes averaging 26.5% and rolling blackouts eminent this
 summer, conservation is not only essential, but critical according to Robert
 J. Kerr, president of Guardian Glass Tinting.
     "It's time for people to wake up and smell the coffee," said Kerr.
 "California consumers and business owners have to realize that energy
 conservation means more than just changing light bulbs, reducing thermostats,
 and tossing out old refrigerators.  It means retrofitting commercial and
 residential windows with solar control film which can reduce energy costs up
 to 50%.  The film rejection of heat allows less air conditioning in the
 summer, and conversely in the winter, it insulates and keeps the heat inside,
 thus using less energy."
     Now that the three major utilities will give rebates to their customers
 -- 20% rebates to consumers and businesses who cut their use at least 20% from
 same period last year -- Kerr stated that it is extremely important that
 California consumers be aware of solar control film as an integral part of
 the energy conservation program.
     Kerr pointed out the need for builders and architects to get up to speed
 in this area.  "Many of these guys believe that low-E glass from the
 manufacturer is sufficient.  That is not correct.  Low-E glass is better than
 plain glass, but it does not block out the heat and harmful UV rays of the sun
 as well as film does.  By applying the proper film to low-E glass, you then
 get the best of both worlds.  It's unfortunate but glass manufacturers have
 sold builders and architects a bill of goods overstating and exaggerating the
 performance of low-E glass."
     Film manufactured today offers state-of-the-art technology.  High
 performance film comes in a variety of forms -- reflective, non-reflective,
 architectural, safety and security with heat rejection up to 80%.
     "You've got to use films that have metal in it," continued Kerr.  "All
 films absorb and reflects solar energy, bit it's the state-of-the-art films
 that hold different metal composites.  Putting the wrong film on the glass
 will not achieve solar energy savings.  And only about 1% of all tint shops
 have the capability or knowledge to address these factors."
     A perfect example of energy conservation is the University of Miami which
 retrofitted some 31,000 square-feet of glass with solar control film.  Florida
 Power & Light gave the University an incentive of almost $16,000 toward the
 cost of installation and the school saved an estimated $7,000 yearly due to
 the increased energy efficiency of the building.
 
     For more technical information, visit www.guardianglasstinting.com.  Or
 call Guardian Glass Tinting at 310/370-6880.
 
 

SOURCE Guardian Glass Tinting
    LOS ANGELES, April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- With Governor Gray Davis announcing
 electrical rate hikes averaging 26.5% and rolling blackouts eminent this
 summer, conservation is not only essential, but critical according to Robert
 J. Kerr, president of Guardian Glass Tinting.
     "It's time for people to wake up and smell the coffee," said Kerr.
 "California consumers and business owners have to realize that energy
 conservation means more than just changing light bulbs, reducing thermostats,
 and tossing out old refrigerators.  It means retrofitting commercial and
 residential windows with solar control film which can reduce energy costs up
 to 50%.  The film rejection of heat allows less air conditioning in the
 summer, and conversely in the winter, it insulates and keeps the heat inside,
 thus using less energy."
     Now that the three major utilities will give rebates to their customers
 -- 20% rebates to consumers and businesses who cut their use at least 20% from
 same period last year -- Kerr stated that it is extremely important that
 California consumers be aware of solar control film as an integral part of
 the energy conservation program.
     Kerr pointed out the need for builders and architects to get up to speed
 in this area.  "Many of these guys believe that low-E glass from the
 manufacturer is sufficient.  That is not correct.  Low-E glass is better than
 plain glass, but it does not block out the heat and harmful UV rays of the sun
 as well as film does.  By applying the proper film to low-E glass, you then
 get the best of both worlds.  It's unfortunate but glass manufacturers have
 sold builders and architects a bill of goods overstating and exaggerating the
 performance of low-E glass."
     Film manufactured today offers state-of-the-art technology.  High
 performance film comes in a variety of forms -- reflective, non-reflective,
 architectural, safety and security with heat rejection up to 80%.
     "You've got to use films that have metal in it," continued Kerr.  "All
 films absorb and reflects solar energy, bit it's the state-of-the-art films
 that hold different metal composites.  Putting the wrong film on the glass
 will not achieve solar energy savings.  And only about 1% of all tint shops
 have the capability or knowledge to address these factors."
     A perfect example of energy conservation is the University of Miami which
 retrofitted some 31,000 square-feet of glass with solar control film.  Florida
 Power & Light gave the University an incentive of almost $16,000 toward the
 cost of installation and the school saved an estimated $7,000 yearly due to
 the increased energy efficiency of the building.
 
     For more technical information, visit www.guardianglasstinting.com.  Or
 call Guardian Glass Tinting at 310/370-6880.
 
 SOURCE  Guardian Glass Tinting