Corn Growers Oppose Spring Rise on The Missouri River

Apr 16, 2001, 01:00 ET from The National Corn Growers Association

    ST. LOUIS, April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- The National Corn Growers Association
 (NCGA) today re-emphasized its opposition to proposed changes in the U.S. Army
 Corps of Engineers Missouri River Master Manual that would harm agriculture
 because of reduced navigation and the potential for spring rises.
     The Corps is considering changes to its operation of dams on the lower
 portion of the river to raise the water level in the spring and lower it
 during the summer.  The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and environmental
 activists contend this will protect birds and fish that have been listed as
 endangered or threatened.
     "NCGA recognizes the recreation and environmental value of the river and
 will work with others to maintain and enhance recreational and environmental
 benefits," stressed Paul Bertels, Director of Production and Marketing for the
 St. Louis-based NCGA that represents 30,000 dues-paying farmers nationwide.
     "However, we want these decisions to be based on science, not politics.
 And to date, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has failed to produce the
 scientific evidence that justifies changing the Missouri Master Manual."
     The NCGA continues to support the management of the Missouri River that
 places the highest priority on economic uses of the river such as flood
 control for farm land, navigation, irrigation and power generation.  "Keeping
 the Missouri River navigable provides competition to rail rates and keeps
 and maintains farm land value," Bertels said.  "A spring rise could actually
 threaten another endangered species: farmers and the communities they
 support."
     For more information about how the National Corn Growers Association
 represents the interests of corn farmers nationwide, see our website
 http://www.ncga.com .
 
 

SOURCE The National Corn Growers Association
    ST. LOUIS, April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- The National Corn Growers Association
 (NCGA) today re-emphasized its opposition to proposed changes in the U.S. Army
 Corps of Engineers Missouri River Master Manual that would harm agriculture
 because of reduced navigation and the potential for spring rises.
     The Corps is considering changes to its operation of dams on the lower
 portion of the river to raise the water level in the spring and lower it
 during the summer.  The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and environmental
 activists contend this will protect birds and fish that have been listed as
 endangered or threatened.
     "NCGA recognizes the recreation and environmental value of the river and
 will work with others to maintain and enhance recreational and environmental
 benefits," stressed Paul Bertels, Director of Production and Marketing for the
 St. Louis-based NCGA that represents 30,000 dues-paying farmers nationwide.
     "However, we want these decisions to be based on science, not politics.
 And to date, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has failed to produce the
 scientific evidence that justifies changing the Missouri Master Manual."
     The NCGA continues to support the management of the Missouri River that
 places the highest priority on economic uses of the river such as flood
 control for farm land, navigation, irrigation and power generation.  "Keeping
 the Missouri River navigable provides competition to rail rates and keeps
 and maintains farm land value," Bertels said.  "A spring rise could actually
 threaten another endangered species: farmers and the communities they
 support."
     For more information about how the National Corn Growers Association
 represents the interests of corn farmers nationwide, see our website
 http://www.ncga.com .
 
 SOURCE  The National Corn Growers Association