Cyberlaw 'Summer Camp' at Harvard Law School

Apr 17, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Berkman Center for Internet & Society

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- The Berkman Center for Internet
 & Society is putting a brand new spin on continuing legal education this
 summer: it will offer a unique Internet Law Course taking place both at the
 Harvard Law School campus and "in cyberspace." Kicking off with an online
 component that begins on June 3, the course will address the most
 controversial "cyberlaw" issues being debated by lawmakers in the United
 States and other countries -- including copyright protection, the digital
 distribution of music, and free speech and privacy online.
     "This program is designed to shed light on the rapidly changing rules
 governing what happens on the Internet," says Berkman Center faculty
 co-director and Harvard Law School professor William Fisher III.  "A great
 deal has changed in the past year -- the litigation over Napster, conflicts
 over domain names, the treatment of online patents, and legal protection of
 encryption technology. Our goals are to inform participants concerning the
 state of the law in these fields and to stimulate debate about where the law
 should be going."
     Taught by world-renowned experts in the field, the Internet Law Course
 will be offered in three stages, with the opening online component followed by
 a week-long residential program at the Harvard Law School campus. The course
 will conclude online, with collaborative learning groups formed at Harvard
 continuing to interact via the Internet.
     "This course demands 'hands-on' experience with the online environment,"
 says Jonathan Zittrain, a Berkman Center faculty co-director who was recently
 named the Berkman Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurial Legal Studies. "It's
 a unique way to sink your teeth into the subject."
     Among the outstanding educators assembled to teach both the online and
 in-person components of the course are Lawrence Lessig, Stanford law professor
 and author of the influential "Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace," Yochai
 Benkler, New York University law professor and noted cyberlaw expert, and
 Charles Nesson, the Berkman Center's faculty director and the Weld Professor
 of Law at Harvard Law School.
     "It is not hard to understand how the Net could become the perfect space
 of regulation or how commerce would play a role in that regulation," says
 Lessig, chair of the Berkman Center's advisory board. "An important question
 we need to ask is: What values are protected there?"
     The Internet Law Course is designed for lawyers, policymakers, new-media
 professionals, online publishers, and journalists who write about technology.
 No previous knowledge of or experience with Internet law is necessary.
 American lawyers in some jurisdictions may be eligible for thirty hours of
 Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit.
     To ensure that the learning environment is conducive to in-depth
 discussion among participants and preserve a low student/faculty ratio,
 enrollment is limited. Registration, which has just opened, is available
 online at http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/ilaw. Please note that the program is
 not a part of the Harvard Law School curriculum, and therefore inquiries
 should not be directed to the University's registrar's office.
     The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School is a
 research program founded to explore the legal, social, and political issues
 resulting from the development of the Internet and its impact on society. As
 part of our active research mission, we develop, use, and freely share an open
 software platform for online education and deliberative processes, as well as
 sponsoring events -- ranging from informal lunches to webcast conferences --
 to bring together a diverse network of participants for substantive debate.
 Visit us online at http://cyber.law.harvard.edu
 
 

SOURCE The Berkman Center for Internet & Society
    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- The Berkman Center for Internet
 & Society is putting a brand new spin on continuing legal education this
 summer: it will offer a unique Internet Law Course taking place both at the
 Harvard Law School campus and "in cyberspace." Kicking off with an online
 component that begins on June 3, the course will address the most
 controversial "cyberlaw" issues being debated by lawmakers in the United
 States and other countries -- including copyright protection, the digital
 distribution of music, and free speech and privacy online.
     "This program is designed to shed light on the rapidly changing rules
 governing what happens on the Internet," says Berkman Center faculty
 co-director and Harvard Law School professor William Fisher III.  "A great
 deal has changed in the past year -- the litigation over Napster, conflicts
 over domain names, the treatment of online patents, and legal protection of
 encryption technology. Our goals are to inform participants concerning the
 state of the law in these fields and to stimulate debate about where the law
 should be going."
     Taught by world-renowned experts in the field, the Internet Law Course
 will be offered in three stages, with the opening online component followed by
 a week-long residential program at the Harvard Law School campus. The course
 will conclude online, with collaborative learning groups formed at Harvard
 continuing to interact via the Internet.
     "This course demands 'hands-on' experience with the online environment,"
 says Jonathan Zittrain, a Berkman Center faculty co-director who was recently
 named the Berkman Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurial Legal Studies. "It's
 a unique way to sink your teeth into the subject."
     Among the outstanding educators assembled to teach both the online and
 in-person components of the course are Lawrence Lessig, Stanford law professor
 and author of the influential "Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace," Yochai
 Benkler, New York University law professor and noted cyberlaw expert, and
 Charles Nesson, the Berkman Center's faculty director and the Weld Professor
 of Law at Harvard Law School.
     "It is not hard to understand how the Net could become the perfect space
 of regulation or how commerce would play a role in that regulation," says
 Lessig, chair of the Berkman Center's advisory board. "An important question
 we need to ask is: What values are protected there?"
     The Internet Law Course is designed for lawyers, policymakers, new-media
 professionals, online publishers, and journalists who write about technology.
 No previous knowledge of or experience with Internet law is necessary.
 American lawyers in some jurisdictions may be eligible for thirty hours of
 Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit.
     To ensure that the learning environment is conducive to in-depth
 discussion among participants and preserve a low student/faculty ratio,
 enrollment is limited. Registration, which has just opened, is available
 online at http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/ilaw. Please note that the program is
 not a part of the Harvard Law School curriculum, and therefore inquiries
 should not be directed to the University's registrar's office.
     The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School is a
 research program founded to explore the legal, social, and political issues
 resulting from the development of the Internet and its impact on society. As
 part of our active research mission, we develop, use, and freely share an open
 software platform for online education and deliberative processes, as well as
 sponsoring events -- ranging from informal lunches to webcast conferences --
 to bring together a diverse network of participants for substantive debate.
 Visit us online at http://cyber.law.harvard.edu
 
 SOURCE  The Berkman Center for Internet & Society