Data Show CHANTIX(TM) (varenicline) Provides Smokers New Hope to Quit Smoking

Studies Published in JAMA Show CHANTIX Significantly Increases Likelihood

of Quitting Over Most Commonly Used Prescription Medication



Jul 04, 2006, 01:00 ET from Pfizer

    NEW YORK, July 4 /PRNewswire/ -- CHANTIX(TM) (varenicline) was shown to
 be effective with a favorable safety profile as an aid to smoking cessation
 treatment, according to three pivotal studies published in this week's
 Journal of the American Medical Association.
     Chantix, the first new prescription smoking cessation medication
 approved in nearly a decade, received U.S. Food and Drug Administration
 approval on May 10. Chantix is expected to be available in U.S. pharmacies
 in August. Because smokers need considerable support to successfully quit,
 Chantix will be available to patients with a support program designed to
 help address behavioral components of smoking dependence. This personalized
 program will be offered at no additional cost and easy to use.
     "According to the World Health Organization, every eight seconds a
 person dies of a smoking-related disease -- almost as quickly as someone
 else takes up smoking for the first time," said Dr. Joseph Feczko, Pfizer's
 chief medical officer. "Chantix represents a significant new discovery for
 smokers who are trying to quit."
     Data show that approximately 44 percent of patients treated with
 Chantix (1mg twice a day) quit smoking by the end of the 12-week treatment
 period versus 30 percent who used buproprion SR (150mg twice a day) and 18
 percent who used placebo. In an additional phase III clinical trial,
 patients who remained quit after 12 weeks of treatment with Chantix were
 randomized to receive an additional 12 weeks of treatment with Chantix or
 placebo. At the end of 24 weeks, 70.5 percent of patients on Chantix
 continued to abstain from smoking compared to 50 percent who switched to
 placebo.
     In trials, Chantix was generally well tolerated with overall
 discontinuation rates similar to placebo. The most frequent side effects
 included nausea, headache, trouble sleeping and changes in dreaming.
     In November 2005, Pfizer submitted a European marketing authorization
 application for varenicline for smoking cessation.
     Pfizer spokespeople and clinical trial investigators will be made
 available for one-on-one interviews.
     Patients and health care providers can visit www.chantix.com or call
 1-877-CHANTIX and register to receive more information about Chantix. For
 prescribing information, please visit www.chantix.com.
     To request free broadcast-standard video please log onto
 www.thenewsmarket.com/pfizer.
 
 

SOURCE Pfizer
    NEW YORK, July 4 /PRNewswire/ -- CHANTIX(TM) (varenicline) was shown to
 be effective with a favorable safety profile as an aid to smoking cessation
 treatment, according to three pivotal studies published in this week's
 Journal of the American Medical Association.
     Chantix, the first new prescription smoking cessation medication
 approved in nearly a decade, received U.S. Food and Drug Administration
 approval on May 10. Chantix is expected to be available in U.S. pharmacies
 in August. Because smokers need considerable support to successfully quit,
 Chantix will be available to patients with a support program designed to
 help address behavioral components of smoking dependence. This personalized
 program will be offered at no additional cost and easy to use.
     "According to the World Health Organization, every eight seconds a
 person dies of a smoking-related disease -- almost as quickly as someone
 else takes up smoking for the first time," said Dr. Joseph Feczko, Pfizer's
 chief medical officer. "Chantix represents a significant new discovery for
 smokers who are trying to quit."
     Data show that approximately 44 percent of patients treated with
 Chantix (1mg twice a day) quit smoking by the end of the 12-week treatment
 period versus 30 percent who used buproprion SR (150mg twice a day) and 18
 percent who used placebo. In an additional phase III clinical trial,
 patients who remained quit after 12 weeks of treatment with Chantix were
 randomized to receive an additional 12 weeks of treatment with Chantix or
 placebo. At the end of 24 weeks, 70.5 percent of patients on Chantix
 continued to abstain from smoking compared to 50 percent who switched to
 placebo.
     In trials, Chantix was generally well tolerated with overall
 discontinuation rates similar to placebo. The most frequent side effects
 included nausea, headache, trouble sleeping and changes in dreaming.
     In November 2005, Pfizer submitted a European marketing authorization
 application for varenicline for smoking cessation.
     Pfizer spokespeople and clinical trial investigators will be made
 available for one-on-one interviews.
     Patients and health care providers can visit www.chantix.com or call
 1-877-CHANTIX and register to receive more information about Chantix. For
 prescribing information, please visit www.chantix.com.
     To request free broadcast-standard video please log onto
 www.thenewsmarket.com/pfizer.
 
 SOURCE Pfizer

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