Delicious Native Edible Plants of Australia -- If Only the Survivor Cast Knew Where to Look

Apr 04, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Art Institutes

    ATLANTA, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- All it took was a little chocolate and
 peanut butter to tempt "Survivor" tribe members during a recent reward
 challenge set in a lake.  But what if the Kucha and Ogakor had been offered
 `Lenah' Wallaby topside, Emu fillet or Quandong Brulee instead?
     According to Chef Marc Jolis of The Art Institute of Atlanta, "Australia
 is abundant with wonderful native ingredients that are the basis of an
 inventive and colorful cuisine."  Had the "Survivor" contestants spent more
 time brushing up on native edible plants of Australia before heading to the
 bush instead of buffing their abs they might enjoy tasty and nutritious meals
 made with ingredients found right outside their tents.
     As a student and admirer of Australian cuisine, Chef Jolis says it's only
 in the last few years that the world has shined a culinary spotlight on the
 country whose centerpiece is a rich native plant life that was first put to
 the taste test by Australia's most experienced naturalists, the Aborigines.
 According to Chef Jolis, they discovered that much of Australia's plant life
 was edible and good tasting.
     An Australian restaurant reflecting many of these trend-setting culinary
 ideas is Australia's Red Ochre Grill with locations in Cairns, Adelaide and
 Alice Springs.  Red Ochre's menus change daily to make best use of seasonal
 ingredients.  Lemon myrtle, illawarra plums, bunya nuts and muntries (native
 cranberries) are just a few of Australia's edible plants you'll find on the
 menu.  Here are some others:
 
     -- Wattle Seed:  varieties of Acacia seeds are collected by Aborigines and
        dry roasted and ground to enhance their natural nutty, coffee-like
        flavor.
     -- Quandong: a wild or desert peach high in vitamin C.
     -- Kurrajong flour: extracted from Kurrajong and Illawarra flame trees,
        seeds are roasted and ground to produce a rich, dark flour.
     -- Warrigal greens: ground cover found in many parts of Australia, used by
        Captain Cook as a spinach substitute to fight scurvy.
     -- Kangaroo and emu:  native game prepared similarly to beef.
 
     To learn more about Australia's native edible plants, visit websites on
 Wild Edible Plants and Ethnobotany.
     For more information on the Culinary Arts Programs of The Art Institutes,
 call 1-888-328-7900 or visit The Art Institutes Web site at
 www.artinstitutes.edu/nr.
 
     The Art Institutes system of 22 educational institutions is located
 nationwide, providing an important source of design, media arts, fashion and
 culinary professionals.  The Art Institutes system of schools has provided
 career-oriented education programs for over 35 years with more than 125,000
 graduates. For more information visit The Art Institutes website at
 www.artinstitutes.edu/nr.
 
 

SOURCE The Art Institutes
    ATLANTA, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- All it took was a little chocolate and
 peanut butter to tempt "Survivor" tribe members during a recent reward
 challenge set in a lake.  But what if the Kucha and Ogakor had been offered
 `Lenah' Wallaby topside, Emu fillet or Quandong Brulee instead?
     According to Chef Marc Jolis of The Art Institute of Atlanta, "Australia
 is abundant with wonderful native ingredients that are the basis of an
 inventive and colorful cuisine."  Had the "Survivor" contestants spent more
 time brushing up on native edible plants of Australia before heading to the
 bush instead of buffing their abs they might enjoy tasty and nutritious meals
 made with ingredients found right outside their tents.
     As a student and admirer of Australian cuisine, Chef Jolis says it's only
 in the last few years that the world has shined a culinary spotlight on the
 country whose centerpiece is a rich native plant life that was first put to
 the taste test by Australia's most experienced naturalists, the Aborigines.
 According to Chef Jolis, they discovered that much of Australia's plant life
 was edible and good tasting.
     An Australian restaurant reflecting many of these trend-setting culinary
 ideas is Australia's Red Ochre Grill with locations in Cairns, Adelaide and
 Alice Springs.  Red Ochre's menus change daily to make best use of seasonal
 ingredients.  Lemon myrtle, illawarra plums, bunya nuts and muntries (native
 cranberries) are just a few of Australia's edible plants you'll find on the
 menu.  Here are some others:
 
     -- Wattle Seed:  varieties of Acacia seeds are collected by Aborigines and
        dry roasted and ground to enhance their natural nutty, coffee-like
        flavor.
     -- Quandong: a wild or desert peach high in vitamin C.
     -- Kurrajong flour: extracted from Kurrajong and Illawarra flame trees,
        seeds are roasted and ground to produce a rich, dark flour.
     -- Warrigal greens: ground cover found in many parts of Australia, used by
        Captain Cook as a spinach substitute to fight scurvy.
     -- Kangaroo and emu:  native game prepared similarly to beef.
 
     To learn more about Australia's native edible plants, visit websites on
 Wild Edible Plants and Ethnobotany.
     For more information on the Culinary Arts Programs of The Art Institutes,
 call 1-888-328-7900 or visit The Art Institutes Web site at
 www.artinstitutes.edu/nr.
 
     The Art Institutes system of 22 educational institutions is located
 nationwide, providing an important source of design, media arts, fashion and
 culinary professionals.  The Art Institutes system of schools has provided
 career-oriented education programs for over 35 years with more than 125,000
 graduates. For more information visit The Art Institutes website at
 www.artinstitutes.edu/nr.
 
 SOURCE  The Art Institutes