Delta Says Presidential Emergency Board May Be Needed

$1.7 Billion Gap Remains Despite Delta's Industry-Leading Offer;

Talks Resume April 18



Apr 12, 2001, 01:00 ET from Delta Air Lines, Inc.

    ATLANTA, April 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Recent media reports have quoted Air
 Line Pilots Association (ALPA) spokespeople characterizing the difference
 between Delta Air Lines' (NYSE:   DAL) and ALPA's current proposals as minimal,
 and easily resolved.  The economic gap between the respective proposals is
 approximately $1.7 billion.  Delta released the following statement regarding
 the status of negotiations and prospects for a contract settlement:
 
     "Delta has offered to make its pilots the highest paid in the commercial
 airline industry.  The company's industry-leading offer sets a new benchmark
 for pilot pay rates.  In the current declining economy, this offer is evidence
 of Delta's strong commitment to its pilots.
     "Delta remains committed to the bargaining process and is hopeful and
 working hard toward a negotiated settlement.
     "The company's proposal adds approximately $2 billion in costs to the
 airline over the next four years.  ALPA's current proposal would add
 approximately $3.7 billion above current costs for the same period.
     "ALPA's stated requirements for contract improvements do not provide a
 framework for a reasonably affordable negotiated settlement.  In the absence
 of a willingness by ALPA to work toward a solution that is economically
 realistic, there is little reason to believe that an agreement can be reached
 during the 30-day cooling-off period.
     "President Bush has stated he will 'take the necessary steps to prevent
 major airline strikes from happening this year.  It's important for our
 economy, but more important, it's important for the hardworking people of
 America, to make sure air service is not disrupted.'  Under federal law, the
 president may appoint a Presidential Emergency Board, which would extend the
 status quo period an additional 60 days, allowing more time for negotiations
 toward settlement."
 
 

SOURCE Delta Air Lines, Inc.
    ATLANTA, April 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Recent media reports have quoted Air
 Line Pilots Association (ALPA) spokespeople characterizing the difference
 between Delta Air Lines' (NYSE:   DAL) and ALPA's current proposals as minimal,
 and easily resolved.  The economic gap between the respective proposals is
 approximately $1.7 billion.  Delta released the following statement regarding
 the status of negotiations and prospects for a contract settlement:
 
     "Delta has offered to make its pilots the highest paid in the commercial
 airline industry.  The company's industry-leading offer sets a new benchmark
 for pilot pay rates.  In the current declining economy, this offer is evidence
 of Delta's strong commitment to its pilots.
     "Delta remains committed to the bargaining process and is hopeful and
 working hard toward a negotiated settlement.
     "The company's proposal adds approximately $2 billion in costs to the
 airline over the next four years.  ALPA's current proposal would add
 approximately $3.7 billion above current costs for the same period.
     "ALPA's stated requirements for contract improvements do not provide a
 framework for a reasonably affordable negotiated settlement.  In the absence
 of a willingness by ALPA to work toward a solution that is economically
 realistic, there is little reason to believe that an agreement can be reached
 during the 30-day cooling-off period.
     "President Bush has stated he will 'take the necessary steps to prevent
 major airline strikes from happening this year.  It's important for our
 economy, but more important, it's important for the hardworking people of
 America, to make sure air service is not disrupted.'  Under federal law, the
 president may appoint a Presidential Emergency Board, which would extend the
 status quo period an additional 60 days, allowing more time for negotiations
 toward settlement."
 
 SOURCE  Delta Air Lines, Inc.