Despite Microsoft Decision, Bluetooth to do Well in Long-Run, Says Allied Business Intelligence

Apr 05, 2001, 01:00 ET from Allied Business Intelligence

    OYSTER BAY, N.Y., April 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Although Microsoft has said it
 will not natively support the Bluetooth protocol stack in its next OS,
 mitigating device interoperability, Allied Business Intelligence (ABI) does
 not believe it will affect the forward march of the Bluetooth industry.
 Windows XP, due out at the end of 2001, will not have Bluetooth drivers
 within, as the Redmond-based software giant called the technology not ready
 for prime time.
     "Device vendors and software enablers have already developed protocol
 stacks for other versions of the Windows family and certainly the new OS will
 simply be written to by these groups as well," said Navin Sabharwal, ABI VP of
 Residential and Networking Technologies. "There is a great deal of interest in
 Bluetooth connectivity on the PC platform. Notebook and PC vendors such as
 Dell, Toshiba and Sony have strongly indicated that they intend to
 aggressively support it."
     One additional point of confusion is that the momentum behind 802.11b will
 hinder Bluetooth adoption. ABI does not believe this to be the case since
 802.11b will never offer the cost, form factor and power consumption
 characteristics to be embedded into mobile handsets, PDAs and other
 power-constrained mobile devices.
     Bluetooth support across all devices is expected during 2002. The progress
 that the industry has made will be discussed by industry leaders at a two-day
 conference, "Bluetooth 2001: Gateway to Connectivity," May 2-3, 2001 in New
 York City at the Marriott Marquis.
     The distinguished faculty includes executives from companies including
 Ericsson, Motorola, IBM, Cambridge Silicon Radio, Silicon Wave, Dell Computer
 Corporation, NewLogic, embedded wireless devices, KPMG Consulting, In2M
 Corporation, Widcomm, GigaAnt, ZiLOG, Mobilian Corporation and Siemens.
     These key executives will be complemented by ABI's senior analysts, who
 will be on-hand to present findings from recent market studies.
 
     Attendees will take away an in-depth understanding of how Bluetooth will
 create new market opportunities. The conference will cover:
     -- The current status of Bluetooth technology
     -- Bluetooth's evolution via specification 2.0 into a rich personal area
        network solution
     -- Bluetooth usage and applications in different market segments
     -- Alternate silicon paths to the promised $5 solution
     -- Forecasts for Bluetooth-enabled equipment and silicon markets
     -- Bluetooth's synergy with emerging cellular technologies such as WAP,
        GPRS and 3G.
     -- Bluetooth's impact on local wireless networking technologies including
        IrDA, 802.11b and HomeRF
 
     In order to get further information on attending this conference please
 call 516-624-3113, email conferences@alliedworld.com or visit
 http://www.alliedworld.com.
 
 

SOURCE Allied Business Intelligence
    OYSTER BAY, N.Y., April 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Although Microsoft has said it
 will not natively support the Bluetooth protocol stack in its next OS,
 mitigating device interoperability, Allied Business Intelligence (ABI) does
 not believe it will affect the forward march of the Bluetooth industry.
 Windows XP, due out at the end of 2001, will not have Bluetooth drivers
 within, as the Redmond-based software giant called the technology not ready
 for prime time.
     "Device vendors and software enablers have already developed protocol
 stacks for other versions of the Windows family and certainly the new OS will
 simply be written to by these groups as well," said Navin Sabharwal, ABI VP of
 Residential and Networking Technologies. "There is a great deal of interest in
 Bluetooth connectivity on the PC platform. Notebook and PC vendors such as
 Dell, Toshiba and Sony have strongly indicated that they intend to
 aggressively support it."
     One additional point of confusion is that the momentum behind 802.11b will
 hinder Bluetooth adoption. ABI does not believe this to be the case since
 802.11b will never offer the cost, form factor and power consumption
 characteristics to be embedded into mobile handsets, PDAs and other
 power-constrained mobile devices.
     Bluetooth support across all devices is expected during 2002. The progress
 that the industry has made will be discussed by industry leaders at a two-day
 conference, "Bluetooth 2001: Gateway to Connectivity," May 2-3, 2001 in New
 York City at the Marriott Marquis.
     The distinguished faculty includes executives from companies including
 Ericsson, Motorola, IBM, Cambridge Silicon Radio, Silicon Wave, Dell Computer
 Corporation, NewLogic, embedded wireless devices, KPMG Consulting, In2M
 Corporation, Widcomm, GigaAnt, ZiLOG, Mobilian Corporation and Siemens.
     These key executives will be complemented by ABI's senior analysts, who
 will be on-hand to present findings from recent market studies.
 
     Attendees will take away an in-depth understanding of how Bluetooth will
 create new market opportunities. The conference will cover:
     -- The current status of Bluetooth technology
     -- Bluetooth's evolution via specification 2.0 into a rich personal area
        network solution
     -- Bluetooth usage and applications in different market segments
     -- Alternate silicon paths to the promised $5 solution
     -- Forecasts for Bluetooth-enabled equipment and silicon markets
     -- Bluetooth's synergy with emerging cellular technologies such as WAP,
        GPRS and 3G.
     -- Bluetooth's impact on local wireless networking technologies including
        IrDA, 802.11b and HomeRF
 
     In order to get further information on attending this conference please
 call 516-624-3113, email conferences@alliedworld.com or visit
 http://www.alliedworld.com.
 
 SOURCE  Allied Business Intelligence