Detroit Mayor Dennis Archer Declines to Seek a Third Term

Apr 17, 2001, 01:00 ET from City of Detroit

    DETROIT, April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Detroit Mayor Dennis W. Archer announced
 today that he will not seek a third term as mayor, but will instead leave
 office when his second term ends on December 31, 2001.
     Mayor Archer shared his decision with his appointees and supporters
 gathered at the Parkside Homes, a public housing development that has
 experienced significant reconstruction during Mayor Archer's administration.
 After more than a decade on the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
 Development's Troubled Housing List, the City of Detroit was removed from the
 list thanks to the leadership of Detroit's Housing Commission and its working
 relationship with its residents and HUD's local and national team.
     "I am extremely proud to have contributed to the transformation of Detroit
 into a city that again commands the world's respect and admiration," Mayor
 Archer said.  "Detroit has been re-established as an attractive place for new
 investment and a city that offers new opportunities for our citizens."
     "I have given this responsibility my best effort for more than seven
 years," the Mayor stated.  "I have tried to offer the people of Detroit a good
 work ethic, long hours, innovation and the energy they deserve from their
 mayor.  Now, I prefer to hand the baton of leadership to a new mayor while the
 city is still on a positive, upward climb."  He added, "Detroit's momentum for
 redevelopment will continue throughout this decade."
     The city has achieved much under Mayor Archer's leadership.  The number of
 serious crimes committed in the city is the lowest committed in Detroit in 30
 years.  The number of homicides dropped 32 percent -- from 579 in 1993 to a
 seven-year low of 396 in 2000.  Fatal fire deaths declined to a 10-year low of
 43 in 2000.  Work is in progress to change and improve both the police and
 fire departments with the goal of implementation by the end of this year.
     In Detroit's neighborhoods, major supermarket, drugstore and discount
 chains such as Kmart, Kroger, Rite Aid and CVS have returned to the city.
 Detroit's Empowerment Zone has led the nation attracting $6 billion in new
 development to Detroit's most distressed industrial areas and neighborhoods,
 and created more than 10,000 new jobs and 1,500 new residential units.
     Comerica Park (the new home for Detroit Tigers baseball), Ford Field (the
 new home for Detroit Lions football), DaimlerChrysler's Mack I and II engine
 plants, renovation of General Motors World Headquarters at the Renaissance
 Center, the ongoing construction of Compuware's World Headquarters, and the
 opening of three interim casinos are some of the downtown development
 highlights.  The 2006 Super Bowl will be played in Detroit at Ford Field.
 Collaboration between city government, the private sector, Detroit's
 foundations and citizens has been essential to the improvement of nearly 400
 city parks and 6,000 acres of park land in the City of Detroit.  Local
 foundations and other corporations contributed $12 million to upgrade 33
 Detroit playgrounds and to create an endowment fund for repairs.
     Personal income taxes are being reduced from 3% to 2% for Detroit
 residents, and from 1.5% to 1% for nonresidents and the corporate income tax
 is being eliminated.
     Detroit's bond ratings on Wall Street have improved 11 times since 1994
 and the budget has been balanced each year since fiscal '94-'95.  Governing
 Magazine and Syracuse University released a study of America's 35 largest
 cities in 2000 which gave the City of Detroit high marks for management of
 budget, finances, staff and information technology.  Detroit ranked ahead of
 major cities such as Chicago, Atlanta, Houston, Dallas and Cleveland.  The
 city has also achieved widespread acclaim and recognition for its growth and
 progress from national and international magazines over the years.
 
 

SOURCE City of Detroit
    DETROIT, April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Detroit Mayor Dennis W. Archer announced
 today that he will not seek a third term as mayor, but will instead leave
 office when his second term ends on December 31, 2001.
     Mayor Archer shared his decision with his appointees and supporters
 gathered at the Parkside Homes, a public housing development that has
 experienced significant reconstruction during Mayor Archer's administration.
 After more than a decade on the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
 Development's Troubled Housing List, the City of Detroit was removed from the
 list thanks to the leadership of Detroit's Housing Commission and its working
 relationship with its residents and HUD's local and national team.
     "I am extremely proud to have contributed to the transformation of Detroit
 into a city that again commands the world's respect and admiration," Mayor
 Archer said.  "Detroit has been re-established as an attractive place for new
 investment and a city that offers new opportunities for our citizens."
     "I have given this responsibility my best effort for more than seven
 years," the Mayor stated.  "I have tried to offer the people of Detroit a good
 work ethic, long hours, innovation and the energy they deserve from their
 mayor.  Now, I prefer to hand the baton of leadership to a new mayor while the
 city is still on a positive, upward climb."  He added, "Detroit's momentum for
 redevelopment will continue throughout this decade."
     The city has achieved much under Mayor Archer's leadership.  The number of
 serious crimes committed in the city is the lowest committed in Detroit in 30
 years.  The number of homicides dropped 32 percent -- from 579 in 1993 to a
 seven-year low of 396 in 2000.  Fatal fire deaths declined to a 10-year low of
 43 in 2000.  Work is in progress to change and improve both the police and
 fire departments with the goal of implementation by the end of this year.
     In Detroit's neighborhoods, major supermarket, drugstore and discount
 chains such as Kmart, Kroger, Rite Aid and CVS have returned to the city.
 Detroit's Empowerment Zone has led the nation attracting $6 billion in new
 development to Detroit's most distressed industrial areas and neighborhoods,
 and created more than 10,000 new jobs and 1,500 new residential units.
     Comerica Park (the new home for Detroit Tigers baseball), Ford Field (the
 new home for Detroit Lions football), DaimlerChrysler's Mack I and II engine
 plants, renovation of General Motors World Headquarters at the Renaissance
 Center, the ongoing construction of Compuware's World Headquarters, and the
 opening of three interim casinos are some of the downtown development
 highlights.  The 2006 Super Bowl will be played in Detroit at Ford Field.
 Collaboration between city government, the private sector, Detroit's
 foundations and citizens has been essential to the improvement of nearly 400
 city parks and 6,000 acres of park land in the City of Detroit.  Local
 foundations and other corporations contributed $12 million to upgrade 33
 Detroit playgrounds and to create an endowment fund for repairs.
     Personal income taxes are being reduced from 3% to 2% for Detroit
 residents, and from 1.5% to 1% for nonresidents and the corporate income tax
 is being eliminated.
     Detroit's bond ratings on Wall Street have improved 11 times since 1994
 and the budget has been balanced each year since fiscal '94-'95.  Governing
 Magazine and Syracuse University released a study of America's 35 largest
 cities in 2000 which gave the City of Detroit high marks for management of
 budget, finances, staff and information technology.  Detroit ranked ahead of
 major cities such as Chicago, Atlanta, Houston, Dallas and Cleveland.  The
 city has also achieved widespread acclaim and recognition for its growth and
 progress from national and international magazines over the years.
 
 SOURCE  City of Detroit