Diverse Women's Field Headed for UPMC Health System/City of Pittsburgh Marathon on May 6

International Athletes Return to Pittsburgh



Apr 23, 2001, 01:00 ET from University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

    PITTSBURGH, April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ --
 After serving as the U.S. Men's Marathon Championship and Olympic Trials for
 the past four years, the UPMC Health System/City of Pittsburgh Marathon
 returns to an all-international race for 2001. When the race steps off in
 front of the City-County Building on May 6 at 7:45 a.m., elite athletes from
 Algeria, Kenya, Poland, Russia, Ukraine, United States and Venezuela will be
 vying for more than $60,000 in prize money and bonuses.
     "Even while we were hosting the U.S. Men's Championships we were able to
 maintain an international women's race," explains Race Director Larry
 Grollman. "But during last year's Olympic Trials we couldn't. It's great to
 see the international elites come back to Pittsburgh, especially the women."
     The elite field includes the following athletes (listed by career best
 times):
     Tatiana Pozdnyakova, 46, Ukraine (2:29:25): Possibly the greatest women's
 masters runner of all-time, Pozdnyakova has won a number of marathons outright
 since turning 40 back in 1995. She set her career best time of 2:29:25 at the
 age of 42 in Chicago in 1998, the second-fastest marathon ever by a masters
 woman. In January of last year -- at the age of 44 -- she won the Houston
 Marathon in 2:32:25, just one of three overall race victories she managed in a
 period of just 15 days. She was 15th (2nd master) at last year's Boston
 Marathon and fourth (1st master) at Twin Cities. She lives in Gainesville,
 Fla. when she stays in the U.S.
     Irina Suvorova, 30, Russia (2:29:43 Career Best): Suvorova, who competed
 first under her maiden name of Pupaza, will make her Pittsburgh debut after a
 strong season last year. She competed in four marathons in 2000, winning two
 (Richmond, Va. and Seville, Spain) and placed second in the other two (Twin
 Cities and Moscow). At the Twin Cities race, she set her personal best time of
 2:29:43. Her victory at Richmond was especially noteworthy. Spurred by the
 incentive of winning a new car for running sub-2:35, Suvorova was not only
 leading all of the women at the 25 mile mark, but all of the men, too! She was
 eventually passed by the men's winner, but was the second runner to cross the
 finish line, smashing the course record and beating her nearest rival in the
 women's race by more than 20 minutes. She lives in Moscow.
     Alevtina Naoumova, 40, Russia (2:29:49): Now a masters athlete, Naoumova
 was a top marathoner in her prime. Her titles include Houston and Twin Cities
 in 1994, Cleveland in 1991 and Lille (France) in 1993. But she is still fast!
 Last year at the age of 39, she clocked 2:35:30 at Cleveland (third place) and
 2:39:08 at Providence (4th place). She also won the Appleton (Wisc.) marathon
 last year. During her 2001 campaign, she was fourth overall, and set a masters
 course record, at the Motorola Austin last February (2:37:47). This will be
 her first time competing at Pittsburgh.
     Mary Alico, 37, Pittsburgh, (2:32:42): Alico is an interrupted runner.
 Formerly one of America's top marathoners, she competed in the U.S. Olympic
 Trials Marathon in 1996 and won Grandma's Marathon (Duluth) the same year,
 setting her career best time. She was third at Twin Cities (2:36:07) the same
 year, and in 1997, she was third at the U.S. Marathon Championships, which
 qualified her to compete in the World Championships Marathon in Athens. But a
 series of health problems put a halt to Alico's running career in 1998, and
 she only recently returned to training. Pittsburgh will be her first marathon
 in nearly four years. She works for Mellon in private banking.
     Yelena Plastinina, 37, Ukraine (2:33:26): A marathon specialist,
 Plastinina has been victorious at the distance from Bermuda to Turkey. Her
 marathon titles include Grandma's (Duluth) 1998, Istanbul 1996, Hamilton
 (Bermuda) 1998 and 1999, Hartford 2000, Apeldoorn (Netherlands) 2000 and
 Kosice (Slovakia) 1993. She has already placed second in two marathons during
 the 2001 season, in Hamilton (2:46:05) and Austin (2:36:05). She resides in
 Sevastopol, Ukraine.
     Violetta Kryza, 32, Poland (2:33:44): A prolific marathoner, Kryza is a
 veteran of over 20 marathons. Her marathon running has taken her as far as
 Bangkok, Sao Paulo, Edinburgh, Taipei and even Cleveland, where she was the
 2000 champion. "I was hoping for third," she said after that race. Kryza has
 12 career marathon wins, and has won the Echternach Marathon in Luxemburg for
 the last four years. During 2000, she competed in six marathons! She will be
 making her Pittsburgh debut, and is coming off of a series of good
 performances this season, including a 1:13:15 half-marathon in The Hague.
     Tatiana Maslova, 34, Russia (2:36:12): A consistent performer, Maslova won
 both the Columbus and Detroit Marathons in 1998, and is a two-time winner at
 Helsinki (1998 & '99). She's raced several times this season close to her U.S.
 base in Florida, and won three races, including the Reedy River Run 10-K
 (Greenville, NC). In her one marathon outing this year, she took 6th in Austin
 last February in 2:40:14. When training in the U.S., she stays in Gainesville,
 Fla.
     Tammy Slusser, 36, Monroeville, Pa. (2:37:14): Two-time Pittsburgh winner
 Slusser crossed the finish line first in 1994 -- when she set her career best
 time -- and again last year in very hot conditions. She was also third in both
 1998 and 1999. Another prolific marathoner, Slusser has traveled the world to
 compete at her favorite distance. She's won marathons in Jamaica, Sydney,
 Bermuda, Marrakesh (Morocco), Memphis, Port of Spain (Trinidad) and Virginia
 Beach. She was twice selected for U.S. national teams, running the Chiba
 Ekiden in 1992 and the World Cup Marathon in 1993. "I've race on every
 continent except Antarctica," she recently said. A 1987 graduate of Indiana
 University of Pennsylvania, Slusser works for a local bank.
     Margaret Kagiri, 32, Kenya (2:37:21): A familiar face on the Pennsylvania
 road-racing scene, Kagiri will be making her Pittsburgh debut. She was 9th in
 the 1999 New York City Marathon, and set her 2:37:21 personal best at the 2000
 Twin Cities Marathon, where she finished 6th. Her other road racing credits
 include two victories at the Fairfield (Conn.) Half-Marathon (1998 and 1999)
 and a win at the Old Kent River Bank Run 25-K (Grand Rapids, Mich.) in 1998.
 When training in the U.S. she resides in West Chester, Pa.
     Michelle Simonaitis, 34, Draper, Utah (2:40:35): Racing at Pittsburgh for
 the first time, Simonaitis will be joined by her husband and coach, Dennis,
 who is a top contender in the men's race. A late bloomer, she set her marathon
 personal best earlier this year, placing seventh at the Motorola Austin
 Marathon last February. Simonaitis competed in last year's U.S. Olympic Trials
 Marathon, and placed 38th. She works as an account manager for Discover
 Financial.
     Jenae Strader, 24, Lansdale, Pa. (2:49:11): At the age of 22, while still
 in college at Temple University, Strader qualified for the 2000 U.S. Olympic
 Trials Marathon in her first marathon. She placed an impressive 41st in that
 race, on a very hot and humid day. She graduated earlier this year from Temple
 with a degree in Political Science. She was born in Pittsburgh, and has never
 raced the marathon here.
     Kristen White, 29, Fayetteville, N.Y. (2:49:48): A pharmacist in Upstate
 New York, White -- who first raced under her maiden name of Schiesswohl --
 qualified for the 2000 U.S. Olympic Trials Marathon in Chicago in 1999. A 1999
 Cornell graduate in nutrition, she received her pharmacist's degree from the
 State University of New York at Buffalo in 1996. Her running club, the
 Syracuse Chargers, voted her their runner of the year last year. This will be
 her first marathon in Pittsburgh.
     Laura Hruby, 40, Pittsburgh, (2:49:53): Hruby had an exciting year in 1999
 when she qualified for the U.S. Olympic Trials Marathon for the first time by
 just seven seconds! She finished the hot and humid race in Columbia, S.C. in
 just over three hours. A flight attendant and a 1982 Penn State graduate, she
 will be making her first appearance at Pittsburgh.
     The women's race winner will receive at least $7,500, and $10,000 if she
 breaks two hours and 35 minutes. The remaining open finishers will receive
 $5,000, $2,500, $2,000, $1,500, $1,000 and $500, respectively. The top U.S.
 finishers -- who can also win open prize money -- will receive $2,500, $2,000,
 $1,500 and $1,000, respectively. Therefore, a U.S. winner running under
 2:35:00 will receive $12,500.
 
     CONTACT:  David Monti, Media Consultant, dmonti@dellepro.com,
 212-752-2666, or Susan Manko, Media Coordinator of UPMC, mankosm@msx.upmc.edu,
 412-624-2607.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X47377784
 
 

SOURCE University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
    PITTSBURGH, April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ --
 After serving as the U.S. Men's Marathon Championship and Olympic Trials for
 the past four years, the UPMC Health System/City of Pittsburgh Marathon
 returns to an all-international race for 2001. When the race steps off in
 front of the City-County Building on May 6 at 7:45 a.m., elite athletes from
 Algeria, Kenya, Poland, Russia, Ukraine, United States and Venezuela will be
 vying for more than $60,000 in prize money and bonuses.
     "Even while we were hosting the U.S. Men's Championships we were able to
 maintain an international women's race," explains Race Director Larry
 Grollman. "But during last year's Olympic Trials we couldn't. It's great to
 see the international elites come back to Pittsburgh, especially the women."
     The elite field includes the following athletes (listed by career best
 times):
     Tatiana Pozdnyakova, 46, Ukraine (2:29:25): Possibly the greatest women's
 masters runner of all-time, Pozdnyakova has won a number of marathons outright
 since turning 40 back in 1995. She set her career best time of 2:29:25 at the
 age of 42 in Chicago in 1998, the second-fastest marathon ever by a masters
 woman. In January of last year -- at the age of 44 -- she won the Houston
 Marathon in 2:32:25, just one of three overall race victories she managed in a
 period of just 15 days. She was 15th (2nd master) at last year's Boston
 Marathon and fourth (1st master) at Twin Cities. She lives in Gainesville,
 Fla. when she stays in the U.S.
     Irina Suvorova, 30, Russia (2:29:43 Career Best): Suvorova, who competed
 first under her maiden name of Pupaza, will make her Pittsburgh debut after a
 strong season last year. She competed in four marathons in 2000, winning two
 (Richmond, Va. and Seville, Spain) and placed second in the other two (Twin
 Cities and Moscow). At the Twin Cities race, she set her personal best time of
 2:29:43. Her victory at Richmond was especially noteworthy. Spurred by the
 incentive of winning a new car for running sub-2:35, Suvorova was not only
 leading all of the women at the 25 mile mark, but all of the men, too! She was
 eventually passed by the men's winner, but was the second runner to cross the
 finish line, smashing the course record and beating her nearest rival in the
 women's race by more than 20 minutes. She lives in Moscow.
     Alevtina Naoumova, 40, Russia (2:29:49): Now a masters athlete, Naoumova
 was a top marathoner in her prime. Her titles include Houston and Twin Cities
 in 1994, Cleveland in 1991 and Lille (France) in 1993. But she is still fast!
 Last year at the age of 39, she clocked 2:35:30 at Cleveland (third place) and
 2:39:08 at Providence (4th place). She also won the Appleton (Wisc.) marathon
 last year. During her 2001 campaign, she was fourth overall, and set a masters
 course record, at the Motorola Austin last February (2:37:47). This will be
 her first time competing at Pittsburgh.
     Mary Alico, 37, Pittsburgh, (2:32:42): Alico is an interrupted runner.
 Formerly one of America's top marathoners, she competed in the U.S. Olympic
 Trials Marathon in 1996 and won Grandma's Marathon (Duluth) the same year,
 setting her career best time. She was third at Twin Cities (2:36:07) the same
 year, and in 1997, she was third at the U.S. Marathon Championships, which
 qualified her to compete in the World Championships Marathon in Athens. But a
 series of health problems put a halt to Alico's running career in 1998, and
 she only recently returned to training. Pittsburgh will be her first marathon
 in nearly four years. She works for Mellon in private banking.
     Yelena Plastinina, 37, Ukraine (2:33:26): A marathon specialist,
 Plastinina has been victorious at the distance from Bermuda to Turkey. Her
 marathon titles include Grandma's (Duluth) 1998, Istanbul 1996, Hamilton
 (Bermuda) 1998 and 1999, Hartford 2000, Apeldoorn (Netherlands) 2000 and
 Kosice (Slovakia) 1993. She has already placed second in two marathons during
 the 2001 season, in Hamilton (2:46:05) and Austin (2:36:05). She resides in
 Sevastopol, Ukraine.
     Violetta Kryza, 32, Poland (2:33:44): A prolific marathoner, Kryza is a
 veteran of over 20 marathons. Her marathon running has taken her as far as
 Bangkok, Sao Paulo, Edinburgh, Taipei and even Cleveland, where she was the
 2000 champion. "I was hoping for third," she said after that race. Kryza has
 12 career marathon wins, and has won the Echternach Marathon in Luxemburg for
 the last four years. During 2000, she competed in six marathons! She will be
 making her Pittsburgh debut, and is coming off of a series of good
 performances this season, including a 1:13:15 half-marathon in The Hague.
     Tatiana Maslova, 34, Russia (2:36:12): A consistent performer, Maslova won
 both the Columbus and Detroit Marathons in 1998, and is a two-time winner at
 Helsinki (1998 & '99). She's raced several times this season close to her U.S.
 base in Florida, and won three races, including the Reedy River Run 10-K
 (Greenville, NC). In her one marathon outing this year, she took 6th in Austin
 last February in 2:40:14. When training in the U.S., she stays in Gainesville,
 Fla.
     Tammy Slusser, 36, Monroeville, Pa. (2:37:14): Two-time Pittsburgh winner
 Slusser crossed the finish line first in 1994 -- when she set her career best
 time -- and again last year in very hot conditions. She was also third in both
 1998 and 1999. Another prolific marathoner, Slusser has traveled the world to
 compete at her favorite distance. She's won marathons in Jamaica, Sydney,
 Bermuda, Marrakesh (Morocco), Memphis, Port of Spain (Trinidad) and Virginia
 Beach. She was twice selected for U.S. national teams, running the Chiba
 Ekiden in 1992 and the World Cup Marathon in 1993. "I've race on every
 continent except Antarctica," she recently said. A 1987 graduate of Indiana
 University of Pennsylvania, Slusser works for a local bank.
     Margaret Kagiri, 32, Kenya (2:37:21): A familiar face on the Pennsylvania
 road-racing scene, Kagiri will be making her Pittsburgh debut. She was 9th in
 the 1999 New York City Marathon, and set her 2:37:21 personal best at the 2000
 Twin Cities Marathon, where she finished 6th. Her other road racing credits
 include two victories at the Fairfield (Conn.) Half-Marathon (1998 and 1999)
 and a win at the Old Kent River Bank Run 25-K (Grand Rapids, Mich.) in 1998.
 When training in the U.S. she resides in West Chester, Pa.
     Michelle Simonaitis, 34, Draper, Utah (2:40:35): Racing at Pittsburgh for
 the first time, Simonaitis will be joined by her husband and coach, Dennis,
 who is a top contender in the men's race. A late bloomer, she set her marathon
 personal best earlier this year, placing seventh at the Motorola Austin
 Marathon last February. Simonaitis competed in last year's U.S. Olympic Trials
 Marathon, and placed 38th. She works as an account manager for Discover
 Financial.
     Jenae Strader, 24, Lansdale, Pa. (2:49:11): At the age of 22, while still
 in college at Temple University, Strader qualified for the 2000 U.S. Olympic
 Trials Marathon in her first marathon. She placed an impressive 41st in that
 race, on a very hot and humid day. She graduated earlier this year from Temple
 with a degree in Political Science. She was born in Pittsburgh, and has never
 raced the marathon here.
     Kristen White, 29, Fayetteville, N.Y. (2:49:48): A pharmacist in Upstate
 New York, White -- who first raced under her maiden name of Schiesswohl --
 qualified for the 2000 U.S. Olympic Trials Marathon in Chicago in 1999. A 1999
 Cornell graduate in nutrition, she received her pharmacist's degree from the
 State University of New York at Buffalo in 1996. Her running club, the
 Syracuse Chargers, voted her their runner of the year last year. This will be
 her first marathon in Pittsburgh.
     Laura Hruby, 40, Pittsburgh, (2:49:53): Hruby had an exciting year in 1999
 when she qualified for the U.S. Olympic Trials Marathon for the first time by
 just seven seconds! She finished the hot and humid race in Columbia, S.C. in
 just over three hours. A flight attendant and a 1982 Penn State graduate, she
 will be making her first appearance at Pittsburgh.
     The women's race winner will receive at least $7,500, and $10,000 if she
 breaks two hours and 35 minutes. The remaining open finishers will receive
 $5,000, $2,500, $2,000, $1,500, $1,000 and $500, respectively. The top U.S.
 finishers -- who can also win open prize money -- will receive $2,500, $2,000,
 $1,500 and $1,000, respectively. Therefore, a U.S. winner running under
 2:35:00 will receive $12,500.
 
     CONTACT:  David Monti, Media Consultant, dmonti@dellepro.com,
 212-752-2666, or Susan Manko, Media Coordinator of UPMC, mankosm@msx.upmc.edu,
 412-624-2607.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X47377784
 
 SOURCE  University of Pittsburgh Medical Center