Drug Treatment May Be the Best Investment on the Street

Apr 05, 2001, 01:00 ET from Hubbard Media Relations

    LOS ANGELES, April 5 /PRNewswire/ -- With stock prices skidding, the best
 investment on the street may be an investment in lives.  And since war level
 production is credited with boosts in economy, maybe a war against something
 that destroys life might be timely.
     After all, the S & P 500 Index has fallen 25.4% since its March 2000 high,
 and the list of major corporations laying off their workforce has become a
 common story in business pages of our newspapers.  In fact, America is in the
 middle of a severe economic slowdown, and fear exists that we are headed into
 a full-blown recession.
     But Clark Carr, President of Narconon International says investment in
 lives not only looks good now, returns are high -- not only in life, but in
 productivity.
     "We as a country have been losing an important war," he said, "and that is
 the war on drugs.  We are living in a society that says drugs are the answer
 to your problems and investing in non-productive strategies and programs."
     The economics of our bad investments in this war have been staggering.  To
 give an example of the escalating costs, President Nixon spent $65 million on
 the drug war in 1969, while in 1982 President Reagan spent $1.65 billion, and
 in 1999 President Clinton spent $17.7 billion.  It does not take a Wall St.
 quantitative genius to see that we are not getting a positive or even
 acceptable return on the investment of these tax dollars.
     In fact, CNN Anchor Lou Waters recently reported that the new survey by
 Pew Center for the People and the Press found that nearly three-quarters of
 Americans say the war on drugs is a dismal failure.  On the same program,
 Betsy Glick, representing the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, said
 in addressing America's drug problem, "We have to continue again, working on
 the demand side.  I think that's one of the things that the movie 'Traffic'
 has really highlighted, is that we can stifle the supply side.  But if we
 don't stop the demand for drugs, then we are never going to be able to resolve
 this epidemic."
     There is also earlier evidence supporting the contention that a "demand
 side" approach to the drug war could also have significant economic impact on
 the nation.  A mid-1990's study by the RAND Corporation prepared for the
 Office of National Drug Control Policy and the United States Army found that
 every additional dollar invested in substance abuse treatment saved taxpayers
 $7.46 in societal costs.
     The same study found that additional domestic law enforcement efforts cost
 15 times as much as treatment to achieve the same reduction in societal costs.
 (Note: Societal costs include crime, violence and loss of productivity, etc.)
 Further, when analyzing options to reduce societal costs of cocaine use, RAND
 found that for every additional $1.00 spent on source-country control,
 societal benefits resulted in a loss of 85 cents; interdiction -- a loss of
 68 cents; and domestic enforcement -- a loss of 48 cents.
     Although such figures point to treatment as the soundest investment, what
 kind?  Ineffective treatments are also a bad investment in the cost-waste of
 the program as well as resultant recidivism and consequent non-productivity
 and even crime.
     Mr. Carr suggests that proven effectiveness, i.e., solid return on
 investment, is also an appropriate measure of the war on drugs.  An effective
 demand-side strategy, he says, is the soundest investment.  And, he says, a
 program with proven effectiveness itself then is the best return on the
 dollar.
     Carr has put his own commitment where his mouth is with the Narconon drug
 rehabilitation and education program.  He personally does not make money on
 it.  He has dedicated his life to the work and he considers time his most
 important asset.  The source of the program is the "Purification Program"
 developed by writer and humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard.  To date, over 250,000
 people in over seventy nations have successfully completed this program as a
 part of salvaging their lives from drugs.  It is also an integral part of
 Narconon, statistically the most successful drug rehabilitation program in the
 world.
     The Purification Program does exactly what its name implies.  Mr. Hubbard
 discovered that drug residues stored in the fatty tissues of the body long
 after the drug had been ingested.  The unique program he developed includes a
 strict regimen of vitamins, diet, exercise, and induced sweating in a sauna.
 It uses vitamins and minerals to dislodge the drug residues, exercise to get
 the circulation going, and finally sweating in the sauna to wash these drugs
 out of the body forever.  The result is a person who feels healthier, can
 think more clearly, and is no longer subject to any restimulating effects of
 drugs in his system.  Mr. Hubbard said of the program, "As soon as an addict
 can feel healthier and more competent mentally and physically without drugs
 than he does on drugs, he ceases to require drugs."
     The drug war has been one of the most expensive and trying endeavors in
 our nation's history.  It is time to change investment strategies.  The new
 "demand side" approach with the Narconon program is the most sensible
 investment seen in a long time.  It has the best risk-reward profile of any
 investment on the street.  While most Americans consider that the drug war is
 already lost, there is an almost unlimited upside potential in salvaging
 lives.  Thus, despite what the stock market is doing at the moment, it is time
 to get very bullish on the future of our nation and handle the drug problem
 once and for all.
     For more information on L. Ron Hubbard's Purification Program read "Clear
 Body Clear Mind," available from bookstores everywhere.  For more information
 on Narconon, call the Narconon Chilocco New Life Center at
 (800) 468-6933.
 
 

SOURCE Hubbard Media Relations
    LOS ANGELES, April 5 /PRNewswire/ -- With stock prices skidding, the best
 investment on the street may be an investment in lives.  And since war level
 production is credited with boosts in economy, maybe a war against something
 that destroys life might be timely.
     After all, the S & P 500 Index has fallen 25.4% since its March 2000 high,
 and the list of major corporations laying off their workforce has become a
 common story in business pages of our newspapers.  In fact, America is in the
 middle of a severe economic slowdown, and fear exists that we are headed into
 a full-blown recession.
     But Clark Carr, President of Narconon International says investment in
 lives not only looks good now, returns are high -- not only in life, but in
 productivity.
     "We as a country have been losing an important war," he said, "and that is
 the war on drugs.  We are living in a society that says drugs are the answer
 to your problems and investing in non-productive strategies and programs."
     The economics of our bad investments in this war have been staggering.  To
 give an example of the escalating costs, President Nixon spent $65 million on
 the drug war in 1969, while in 1982 President Reagan spent $1.65 billion, and
 in 1999 President Clinton spent $17.7 billion.  It does not take a Wall St.
 quantitative genius to see that we are not getting a positive or even
 acceptable return on the investment of these tax dollars.
     In fact, CNN Anchor Lou Waters recently reported that the new survey by
 Pew Center for the People and the Press found that nearly three-quarters of
 Americans say the war on drugs is a dismal failure.  On the same program,
 Betsy Glick, representing the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, said
 in addressing America's drug problem, "We have to continue again, working on
 the demand side.  I think that's one of the things that the movie 'Traffic'
 has really highlighted, is that we can stifle the supply side.  But if we
 don't stop the demand for drugs, then we are never going to be able to resolve
 this epidemic."
     There is also earlier evidence supporting the contention that a "demand
 side" approach to the drug war could also have significant economic impact on
 the nation.  A mid-1990's study by the RAND Corporation prepared for the
 Office of National Drug Control Policy and the United States Army found that
 every additional dollar invested in substance abuse treatment saved taxpayers
 $7.46 in societal costs.
     The same study found that additional domestic law enforcement efforts cost
 15 times as much as treatment to achieve the same reduction in societal costs.
 (Note: Societal costs include crime, violence and loss of productivity, etc.)
 Further, when analyzing options to reduce societal costs of cocaine use, RAND
 found that for every additional $1.00 spent on source-country control,
 societal benefits resulted in a loss of 85 cents; interdiction -- a loss of
 68 cents; and domestic enforcement -- a loss of 48 cents.
     Although such figures point to treatment as the soundest investment, what
 kind?  Ineffective treatments are also a bad investment in the cost-waste of
 the program as well as resultant recidivism and consequent non-productivity
 and even crime.
     Mr. Carr suggests that proven effectiveness, i.e., solid return on
 investment, is also an appropriate measure of the war on drugs.  An effective
 demand-side strategy, he says, is the soundest investment.  And, he says, a
 program with proven effectiveness itself then is the best return on the
 dollar.
     Carr has put his own commitment where his mouth is with the Narconon drug
 rehabilitation and education program.  He personally does not make money on
 it.  He has dedicated his life to the work and he considers time his most
 important asset.  The source of the program is the "Purification Program"
 developed by writer and humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard.  To date, over 250,000
 people in over seventy nations have successfully completed this program as a
 part of salvaging their lives from drugs.  It is also an integral part of
 Narconon, statistically the most successful drug rehabilitation program in the
 world.
     The Purification Program does exactly what its name implies.  Mr. Hubbard
 discovered that drug residues stored in the fatty tissues of the body long
 after the drug had been ingested.  The unique program he developed includes a
 strict regimen of vitamins, diet, exercise, and induced sweating in a sauna.
 It uses vitamins and minerals to dislodge the drug residues, exercise to get
 the circulation going, and finally sweating in the sauna to wash these drugs
 out of the body forever.  The result is a person who feels healthier, can
 think more clearly, and is no longer subject to any restimulating effects of
 drugs in his system.  Mr. Hubbard said of the program, "As soon as an addict
 can feel healthier and more competent mentally and physically without drugs
 than he does on drugs, he ceases to require drugs."
     The drug war has been one of the most expensive and trying endeavors in
 our nation's history.  It is time to change investment strategies.  The new
 "demand side" approach with the Narconon program is the most sensible
 investment seen in a long time.  It has the best risk-reward profile of any
 investment on the street.  While most Americans consider that the drug war is
 already lost, there is an almost unlimited upside potential in salvaging
 lives.  Thus, despite what the stock market is doing at the moment, it is time
 to get very bullish on the future of our nation and handle the drug problem
 once and for all.
     For more information on L. Ron Hubbard's Purification Program read "Clear
 Body Clear Mind," available from bookstores everywhere.  For more information
 on Narconon, call the Narconon Chilocco New Life Center at
 (800) 468-6933.
 
 SOURCE  Hubbard Media Relations