Dynamis Therapeutics Announces Breakthrough Drug Candidate, DYN 12, to Prevent Diabetic Kidney Disease

Apr 02, 2001, 01:00 ET from Dynamis Therapeutics

    WYNDMOOR, Pa., April 2 /PRNewswire/ -- Dynamis Therapeutics announced
 today that the company's small molecule drug, DYN 12, has successfully reduced
 levels of 3-deoxyglucosone (3DG) in diabetic rats.  3DG is a highly reactive
 molecule that causes proteins to cross-link, lose function, and block arteries
 and passageways.  3DG is also a proven factor in the development of Advanced
 Glycation End products (AGEs), a leading cause of diabetic kidney disease.
 Dynamis recently discovered, purified, and identified the enzyme Amadorase,
 which is responsible for the formation of 3DG in the kidney.  Dynamis has
 spent the last two years testing compounds that might inhibit the enzyme and
 therefore prevent the formation of 3DG.
     "I have been involved in technology development all my life, and this is
 the most significant discovery with which I have ever been associated.
 Discovering the enzyme and then a drug to inhibit it should prevent not only
 kidney disease, but it likely should prevent the other diseases associated
 with diabetes.  The 3DG that is made in the kidney enters the blood and moves
 to other organs where it can do significant harm.  We expect that preventing
 its formation should have impact throughout the body," said Annette M. Tobia,
 Ph.D., J.D., co-founder, president, and CEO of Dynamis Therapeutics, Inc.
     Truman R. Brown, Ph.D., co-founder of Dynamis, and chairman of the
 Scientific Advisory Board, added "The dramatic lowering of the levels of 3DG
 in both urine and plasma confirms that the inhibition of Amadorase represents
 a totally new and novel approach to combating diabetic complications. This
 significant scientific discovery brings us much closer to reaching our goal of
 preventing the long-term complications of diabetes in a safer manner than any
 other approach.  We use low concentrations of DYN 12. The drug is concentrated
 in the kidney, the target organ, and does not appear to concentrate elsewhere,
 minimizing the potential for adverse side effects.
     Said Dr. Tobia, "We are now actively seeking pharmaceutical companies that
 are interested in further developing DYN 12 and other inhibitors and in
 running the clinical trials that are necessary to get the drug to market."
     Diabetes affects an estimated 16 million people in the United States
 alone, according to the American Diabetes Association.  An estimated 30 to
 40 percent of those with Type 1 diabetes and 10 to 15 percent of those with
 Type 2 diabetes are likely to develop kidney disease, the leading cause of
 end-stage renal failure, with an associated cost of over $5 billion annually.
     Dynamis Therapeutics, with headquarters in Wyndmoor, PA, was founded in
 1997 on the strength of innovative technology developed at Fox Chase Cancer
 Center of Philadelphia, PA, where research on the Amadorase inhibitor was
 conducted.  The company is dedicated to the development of compounds for the
 effective treatment of the complications of diabetes.
     For more information, visit www.Dynamis-Therapeutics.com or contact
 Annette M. Tobia, Ph.D., J.D. President and CEO of Dynamis Therapeutics, Inc.
 TEL: 215-402-9345 FAX: 215-402-9344
 
 

SOURCE Dynamis Therapeutics
    WYNDMOOR, Pa., April 2 /PRNewswire/ -- Dynamis Therapeutics announced
 today that the company's small molecule drug, DYN 12, has successfully reduced
 levels of 3-deoxyglucosone (3DG) in diabetic rats.  3DG is a highly reactive
 molecule that causes proteins to cross-link, lose function, and block arteries
 and passageways.  3DG is also a proven factor in the development of Advanced
 Glycation End products (AGEs), a leading cause of diabetic kidney disease.
 Dynamis recently discovered, purified, and identified the enzyme Amadorase,
 which is responsible for the formation of 3DG in the kidney.  Dynamis has
 spent the last two years testing compounds that might inhibit the enzyme and
 therefore prevent the formation of 3DG.
     "I have been involved in technology development all my life, and this is
 the most significant discovery with which I have ever been associated.
 Discovering the enzyme and then a drug to inhibit it should prevent not only
 kidney disease, but it likely should prevent the other diseases associated
 with diabetes.  The 3DG that is made in the kidney enters the blood and moves
 to other organs where it can do significant harm.  We expect that preventing
 its formation should have impact throughout the body," said Annette M. Tobia,
 Ph.D., J.D., co-founder, president, and CEO of Dynamis Therapeutics, Inc.
     Truman R. Brown, Ph.D., co-founder of Dynamis, and chairman of the
 Scientific Advisory Board, added "The dramatic lowering of the levels of 3DG
 in both urine and plasma confirms that the inhibition of Amadorase represents
 a totally new and novel approach to combating diabetic complications. This
 significant scientific discovery brings us much closer to reaching our goal of
 preventing the long-term complications of diabetes in a safer manner than any
 other approach.  We use low concentrations of DYN 12. The drug is concentrated
 in the kidney, the target organ, and does not appear to concentrate elsewhere,
 minimizing the potential for adverse side effects.
     Said Dr. Tobia, "We are now actively seeking pharmaceutical companies that
 are interested in further developing DYN 12 and other inhibitors and in
 running the clinical trials that are necessary to get the drug to market."
     Diabetes affects an estimated 16 million people in the United States
 alone, according to the American Diabetes Association.  An estimated 30 to
 40 percent of those with Type 1 diabetes and 10 to 15 percent of those with
 Type 2 diabetes are likely to develop kidney disease, the leading cause of
 end-stage renal failure, with an associated cost of over $5 billion annually.
     Dynamis Therapeutics, with headquarters in Wyndmoor, PA, was founded in
 1997 on the strength of innovative technology developed at Fox Chase Cancer
 Center of Philadelphia, PA, where research on the Amadorase inhibitor was
 conducted.  The company is dedicated to the development of compounds for the
 effective treatment of the complications of diabetes.
     For more information, visit www.Dynamis-Therapeutics.com or contact
 Annette M. Tobia, Ph.D., J.D. President and CEO of Dynamis Therapeutics, Inc.
 TEL: 215-402-9345 FAX: 215-402-9344
 
 SOURCE  Dynamis Therapeutics