Earth Day 2001: Forest Products Industry Does Its Part for Clean Water

Apr 17, 2001, 01:00 ET from Hardwood Lumber Manufacturers Association of Pennsylvania

    HERSHEY, Pa., April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Pennsylvania's timber and forest
 products industry harvests more than one billion board feet(1) of timber each
 year for consumer products -- enough timber to circle the globe more than
 seven times.  Yet, timber harvesting today boasts the best record for nonpoint
 source water pollution of any land use in the state.
     "The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's (DEP) ongoing
 water quality assessment lists silviculture at the bottom of 32 river and
 stream nonpoint impairment sources," said Thomas Buzby, chairman of the
 Hardwood Lumber Manufacturers Association of Pennsylvania (HLMA).
 Silviculture is the art, science and practice of establishing, managing and
 reproducing forests.
     "DEP's year 2000 Section 305(b) Water Quality Assessment Report to the
 federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) shows that silviculture
 accounted for less than one 10,000th (.0001) of river and stream impairment --
 a negligible impact," said Buzby.
     "That's good news for our water quality and watersheds.  It's a great
 record for the forest products industry and for Pennsylvanians to celebrate on
 Earth Day (April 22)," Buzby noted.  "We want the public to know we are good
 stewards of Pennsylvania's natural resources as we manage Penn's Woods."
     Nonpoint source water pollution is primarily caused by rain- or
 snowmelt-induced runoff that can erode the soil and carry natural or manmade
 pollutants across the ground and into the water.
     "In today's modern forest management, trees are harvested and transported
 using environmentally sensitive methods that minimize soil disturbance.  And
 in all commercial harvest situations, the forest products industry uses
 state-of-the-art best management practices (BMPs) in its concerted effort to
 prevent nonpoint source pollution," said Buzby.
     Water quality BMP techniques, an integral part of the Sustainable Forestry
 Initiativesm (SFI(sm)) program, include the set aside of streamside management
 zones, use of water bars (speed bumps for water) to inhibit runoff, as well as
 immediate seeding and mulching of disturbed areas.
     The forest products industry emphasizes use of BMPs through SFI(sm), a
 comprehensive program of education, training and performance measures that
 integrate the natural growth and harvesting of trees with the protection of
 wildlife, plants, soil, air and water quality.  Buzby credits SFI water
 quality training programs for the success of industry pollution reduction
 techniques.
     The timber industry in Pennsylvania is regulated by the state's Clean
 Streams Law, which implements the federal Clean Water Act.  The Clean Streams
 Law includes programs to control, prevent and remediate water pollution.
 State regulations under the Nonpoint Source Management Program require erosion
 and sedimentation control plans for earth disturbance activities, such as
 timber harvesting.  Administered by DEP and praised by EPA for its design, the
 nonpoint program identifies BMP-based programs as the preferred means to
 reduce water pollution from silvicultural operations.
     Once among seven leading sources of impairment to rivers and streams,
 silviculture was dropped from the EPA leading source list in 1996.
 
     (1) A board foot is a board one foot wide, one foot long and one inch
 thick.
 
     Attached:  Table 2 and Table 3 of DEP's year 2000 Section 305(b) Water
 Quality Assessment Report to the EPA
 
                                Tables from the
              Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
            Year 2000 Section 305(b) Water Quality Assessment Report
                 To the federal Environmental Protection Agency
 
 TABLE 2  Statewide Assessment -- Rivers and Streams  Aquatic Life Use Support
 
    Category                   Miles
    Total Miles                83,161
    Total Supporting           28,235
    Total Impaired             7,261
    Scheduled for Assessment   47,665
 
         Table 3  Rivers and Streams  Sources and Causes of Impairment
 
     Source of Impairment         Miles         Cause of Impairment  Miles
     Agriculture                   2736                   Siltation   3016
     Abandoned Mine Drainage       2711                      Metals   2536
     Urban Runoff/Storm Sewers     1014                   Nutrients   1705
     Source Unknown                 759                          pH   1391
     Habitat Modification           424 Organic Enrichment/Low D.O.    845
     Small Residential Runoff       259                         PCB    678
     Other                          259               Cause Unknown    549
     Municipal Point Source         242      Water/Flow Variability    537
     Road Runoff                    209   Other Habitat Alterations    506
     Industrial Point Source        180            Flow Alterations    498
     Removal of Vegetation          148            Suspended Solids    416
     Atmospheric Deposition         135                   Chlordane    311
     Construction                   134                   Turbidity    223
     Onsite Wastewater              113            Other Inorganics    166
     Land Development               112      Excessive Algal Growth    121
     Combined Sewer Overflow         73      Salinity/TDS/Chlorides    117
     Hydromodification               55       Thermal Modifications     57
     Flow Regulation/Modification    53        Nonpriority Organics     41
     Channelization                  50           Unionized Ammonia     41
     Upstream Impoundment            47              Oil and Grease     36
     Natural Sources                 43            Unknown Toxicity     30
     Bank Modifications              42                       Mirex     23
     Subsurface Mining               24           Priority Organics     21
     Draining or Filling             21                  Pesticides     20
     Golf Courses                    18                   Pathogens     16
     Package Plants                  17              Taste and Odor     15
     Highway, Road,
      Bridge Construction            13                       Color     11
     Surface Mining                   8                    Chlorine     11
     Petroleum Activities             6      Noxious Aquatic Plants      3
     Land Disposal                    4        Filling and Draining      2
     Erosion from Derelict Land       4
     Silviculture                     3
 
 
 

SOURCE Hardwood Lumber Manufacturers Association of Pennsylvania
    HERSHEY, Pa., April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Pennsylvania's timber and forest
 products industry harvests more than one billion board feet(1) of timber each
 year for consumer products -- enough timber to circle the globe more than
 seven times.  Yet, timber harvesting today boasts the best record for nonpoint
 source water pollution of any land use in the state.
     "The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's (DEP) ongoing
 water quality assessment lists silviculture at the bottom of 32 river and
 stream nonpoint impairment sources," said Thomas Buzby, chairman of the
 Hardwood Lumber Manufacturers Association of Pennsylvania (HLMA).
 Silviculture is the art, science and practice of establishing, managing and
 reproducing forests.
     "DEP's year 2000 Section 305(b) Water Quality Assessment Report to the
 federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) shows that silviculture
 accounted for less than one 10,000th (.0001) of river and stream impairment --
 a negligible impact," said Buzby.
     "That's good news for our water quality and watersheds.  It's a great
 record for the forest products industry and for Pennsylvanians to celebrate on
 Earth Day (April 22)," Buzby noted.  "We want the public to know we are good
 stewards of Pennsylvania's natural resources as we manage Penn's Woods."
     Nonpoint source water pollution is primarily caused by rain- or
 snowmelt-induced runoff that can erode the soil and carry natural or manmade
 pollutants across the ground and into the water.
     "In today's modern forest management, trees are harvested and transported
 using environmentally sensitive methods that minimize soil disturbance.  And
 in all commercial harvest situations, the forest products industry uses
 state-of-the-art best management practices (BMPs) in its concerted effort to
 prevent nonpoint source pollution," said Buzby.
     Water quality BMP techniques, an integral part of the Sustainable Forestry
 Initiativesm (SFI(sm)) program, include the set aside of streamside management
 zones, use of water bars (speed bumps for water) to inhibit runoff, as well as
 immediate seeding and mulching of disturbed areas.
     The forest products industry emphasizes use of BMPs through SFI(sm), a
 comprehensive program of education, training and performance measures that
 integrate the natural growth and harvesting of trees with the protection of
 wildlife, plants, soil, air and water quality.  Buzby credits SFI water
 quality training programs for the success of industry pollution reduction
 techniques.
     The timber industry in Pennsylvania is regulated by the state's Clean
 Streams Law, which implements the federal Clean Water Act.  The Clean Streams
 Law includes programs to control, prevent and remediate water pollution.
 State regulations under the Nonpoint Source Management Program require erosion
 and sedimentation control plans for earth disturbance activities, such as
 timber harvesting.  Administered by DEP and praised by EPA for its design, the
 nonpoint program identifies BMP-based programs as the preferred means to
 reduce water pollution from silvicultural operations.
     Once among seven leading sources of impairment to rivers and streams,
 silviculture was dropped from the EPA leading source list in 1996.
 
     (1) A board foot is a board one foot wide, one foot long and one inch
 thick.
 
     Attached:  Table 2 and Table 3 of DEP's year 2000 Section 305(b) Water
 Quality Assessment Report to the EPA
 
                                Tables from the
              Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
            Year 2000 Section 305(b) Water Quality Assessment Report
                 To the federal Environmental Protection Agency
 
 TABLE 2  Statewide Assessment -- Rivers and Streams  Aquatic Life Use Support
 
    Category                   Miles
    Total Miles                83,161
    Total Supporting           28,235
    Total Impaired             7,261
    Scheduled for Assessment   47,665
 
         Table 3  Rivers and Streams  Sources and Causes of Impairment
 
     Source of Impairment         Miles         Cause of Impairment  Miles
     Agriculture                   2736                   Siltation   3016
     Abandoned Mine Drainage       2711                      Metals   2536
     Urban Runoff/Storm Sewers     1014                   Nutrients   1705
     Source Unknown                 759                          pH   1391
     Habitat Modification           424 Organic Enrichment/Low D.O.    845
     Small Residential Runoff       259                         PCB    678
     Other                          259               Cause Unknown    549
     Municipal Point Source         242      Water/Flow Variability    537
     Road Runoff                    209   Other Habitat Alterations    506
     Industrial Point Source        180            Flow Alterations    498
     Removal of Vegetation          148            Suspended Solids    416
     Atmospheric Deposition         135                   Chlordane    311
     Construction                   134                   Turbidity    223
     Onsite Wastewater              113            Other Inorganics    166
     Land Development               112      Excessive Algal Growth    121
     Combined Sewer Overflow         73      Salinity/TDS/Chlorides    117
     Hydromodification               55       Thermal Modifications     57
     Flow Regulation/Modification    53        Nonpriority Organics     41
     Channelization                  50           Unionized Ammonia     41
     Upstream Impoundment            47              Oil and Grease     36
     Natural Sources                 43            Unknown Toxicity     30
     Bank Modifications              42                       Mirex     23
     Subsurface Mining               24           Priority Organics     21
     Draining or Filling             21                  Pesticides     20
     Golf Courses                    18                   Pathogens     16
     Package Plants                  17              Taste and Odor     15
     Highway, Road,
      Bridge Construction            13                       Color     11
     Surface Mining                   8                    Chlorine     11
     Petroleum Activities             6      Noxious Aquatic Plants      3
     Land Disposal                    4        Filling and Draining      2
     Erosion from Derelict Land       4
     Silviculture                     3
 
 
 SOURCE  Hardwood Lumber Manufacturers Association of Pennsylvania