Electronics Manufacturers and Their Supply Chain Partners Demonstrate Standards for Product Data Exchange

Apr 24, 2001, 01:00 ET from National Electronics Manufacturing Initiative

    HERNDON, Va., April 24 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- A
 coalition of electronics manufacturers, solution providers and standards
 organizations demonstrated the exchange of engineering and manufacturing data
 over the Internet at last week's RosettaNet Partner Conference.  Based on
 proposed IPC and RosettaNet standards, this prototype demonstration
 illustrated how the manufacturing supply web can increase efficiencies,
 shorten time to market and improve return on investment (ROI) by using
 standards-based interfaces to exchange data between partners.
     The standards showcased in the demo are the first of several initiated by
 the National Electronics Manufacturing Initiative's (NEMI's) Virtual Factory
 Information Interchange Project (VFIIP).  VFIIP has worked closely with
 RosettaNet and IPC to ensure consistency between the two organizations'
 standards and to leverage efforts toward the common goal of enabling agile,
 cost-effective data exchange among supply chain partners.
     Organizations involved in the prototype demonstration were Agile Software,
 Extricity, Georgia Institute of Technology, Intel, National Institute of
 Standards and Technology (NIST), Netfish Technologies, Nortel Networks, PTC
 (Nasdaq:   PMTC) and SCI Systems.
     Vin Melvin, chief information officer of SCI said, "Many of our customers
 are OEMs, each with their own systems and methods of defining product data.
 SCI wants to create a common process to bring in all our customers' data for
 fast, flexible and effective information sharing and responsiveness.  This
 will allow a global and far more consistent approach to managing the
 integration of new products and releases within our environment."
 
     Return on Investment
     John Cartwright, program manager, Supply Chain Applications, Mergers,
 Acquisitions and Outsourcing for Intel, said he estimates that use of the
 proposed data exchange standards will yield significant return on investment
 for both OEMs and EMS providers.
     "Historically, major OEMs had to install leased lines directly into their
 trading partners' manufacturing facilities in order to transfer files
 securely.  This required firewalls, servers and dedicated personnel to handle
 the validation and entry of information into the manufacturer's internal bill
 of materials management system," Cartwright said.  "Two years ago, this kind
 of system could run as much as $350K in set-up costs and more than $100K in
 annual fees.  That's on the OEM side.  Then there are additional costs on the
 EMS side to install and maintain each proprietary system.  If you take this
 cost scenario and multiply it times the number of major trading partners EMS
 companies have to deal with, the result is millions of dollars spent annually
 on proprietary set-ups and maintenance."
 
     Demonstration Details
     In the prototype demo, proposed RosettaNet Partner Interface Processes(TM)
 (PIPs(TM)) 2C1 through 2C6 and the proposed IPC-2578 standard were used to
 support data interchange between two OEMs (represented by Nortel Networks and
 Intel), two EMS providers (represented by SCI Systems and Georgia Tech) and a
 supplier (represented by NIST).
     The demo specifically showed how the PDX standards and the related
 RosettaNet PIPs can be used in concert to initiate a new product build and
 implement engineering change requests.  Both the RosettaNet and IPC standards
 provide an XML (extensible mark-up language) encoding scheme that enables a
 total product definition to be encoded at a level appropriate to facilitate
 supply chain interactions.
     In the demo, the OEMs sent two different bill of materials (BOMs) to each
 of the EMS providers, and the BOMs were loaded into the respective systems.
 In addition, the supplier initiated an engineering change request, which was
 communicated back through the EMS providers to the OEMs.  The significance of
 these interactions is that they were accomplished using three different
 gateway products and the participants were loading the BOM information into
 different back-end systems.
     For demonstration purposes, Nortel Networks ran its own internal system
 plus PTC's Windchill Gateway for RosettaNet to pass the PIPs; while Intel used
 an internal system and Extricity B2B(TM).  The two EMS providers made use of
 Netfish Technologies' XDI Server plus Agile solutions -- Agile Integration
 Server(TM) and Agile Anywhere(TM) -- for implementation of the PIPs (including
 transport and security) and for implementation of BOM load and change
 management.  Similarly, NIST (as the supplier) used the Netfish XDI Server as
 well as their own query engine -- based on other RosettaNet PIPs -- to access
 component information.  Although not shown in the demo, these standards can
 also capture and transfer post-production product configuration data and are
 being enhanced to include quality reports.
 
     Background & History
     The prototype demonstration leveraged thousands of hours of work by some
 of the industry's leading OEMs, EMS providers, solution providers, plus
 government and academia.  Through NEMI's Virtual Factory Project, these
 organizations joined forces to develop standards that would help shorten the
 time and reduce the cost required to establish and maintain information
 exchange partnerships across the electronics manufacturing supply web.
 Project participation continues to increase, and current members include OEMs
 (Intel Corporation, Lucent Technologies and Nortel Networks), EMS providers
 (Celestica, Inc., SCI Systems, Inc. and Solectron Corporation), vendors and
 solution providers (Agile Software Corporation, Extricity Inc., GenRad Inc.,
 META Group, Netfish Technologies Inc., PTC, Universal Instruments and Valor
 Computerized Systems), plus government (NIST) and university members (Georgia
 Tech).
     Building on project participant Agile's exchange model, VFIIP developed a
 series of product data exchange (PDX) specifications to enable supply chain
 partners to exchange manufacturing and as-built product information.  NEMI is
 collaborating with IPC, which created the IPC 2570 series of standards
 specifically for the PDX specifications.  NEMI has also established a
 partnership with RosettaNet, which is integrating the PDX standard suite into
 its Cluster 2 (standards relating to product information) and Cluster 7
 (standards relating to manufacturing).
     Intel's Cartwright is a leader of NEMI's Virtual Factory Project and also
 product manager for RosettaNet's Clusters 2 and 7 as well as program manager
 of Discrete Manufacturing.  He says that a significant benefit resulting from
 the close coordination between VFIIP, RosettaNet and IPC is the consistency of
 naming conventions and structure between the IPC and RosettaNet standards.
 "We wanted to be sure that we did not end up with competing and conflicting
 specifications for exchanging the same type of information," he said.  "By
 harmonizing the IPC standards with the RosettaNet PIPs, we are able to give
 industry a clear and unambiguous way of exchanging information that requires a
 single port of the exchange software rather than a different solution for each
 trading partner.  That's a really big win.  RosettaNet has even created its
 PIPs so that the IPC standards can be directly attached.  It doesn't get more
 integrated than that."
     The RosettaNet and IPC standards will enable trading partners to exchange
 and manage the following:
 
     * Load bill of materials (BOM) information (without manual mistakes).
     * Manage approved vendor list (AVL) and approved manufacturer list (AML)
        information.
     * Update and track approvals of engineering change orders (ECOs).
     * Report work in process information in real time.
     * Distribute warranty entitlement information from "as-built"
        manufacturing information.
     * Track quality information within the manufacturing process.
     * Create and distribute quality alerts to contain any manufacturing
       excursions.
     * Load catalog information for use in BOMs and to respond to requests for
        quotes.
     * Include engineering notes, CAD/CAM design information, or other
        information that can be attached and used in the decision-making
        processes.
 
     IPC-2578 is one of three PDX standards currently available for industry
 comment, and IPC is targeting this June for final release.  The RosettaNet 2C1
 through 2C6 PIPs were recently voted on and have been released.
 
     Trademark Notes:
     Agile Software, Agile Anywhere and Agile Integration Server are trademarks
 of Agile Software Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries.
     Extricity and Extricity B2B are trademarks of Extricity, Inc.
     PTC and Windchill are trademarks or registered trademarks of Parametric
 Technology Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and in other
 countries.
     SCI is a registered trademark of SCI Systems, Inc.
     All other brand or product names are trademarks and registered trademarks
 of their respective holders.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X93689204
 
 

SOURCE National Electronics Manufacturing Initiative
    HERNDON, Va., April 24 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- A
 coalition of electronics manufacturers, solution providers and standards
 organizations demonstrated the exchange of engineering and manufacturing data
 over the Internet at last week's RosettaNet Partner Conference.  Based on
 proposed IPC and RosettaNet standards, this prototype demonstration
 illustrated how the manufacturing supply web can increase efficiencies,
 shorten time to market and improve return on investment (ROI) by using
 standards-based interfaces to exchange data between partners.
     The standards showcased in the demo are the first of several initiated by
 the National Electronics Manufacturing Initiative's (NEMI's) Virtual Factory
 Information Interchange Project (VFIIP).  VFIIP has worked closely with
 RosettaNet and IPC to ensure consistency between the two organizations'
 standards and to leverage efforts toward the common goal of enabling agile,
 cost-effective data exchange among supply chain partners.
     Organizations involved in the prototype demonstration were Agile Software,
 Extricity, Georgia Institute of Technology, Intel, National Institute of
 Standards and Technology (NIST), Netfish Technologies, Nortel Networks, PTC
 (Nasdaq:   PMTC) and SCI Systems.
     Vin Melvin, chief information officer of SCI said, "Many of our customers
 are OEMs, each with their own systems and methods of defining product data.
 SCI wants to create a common process to bring in all our customers' data for
 fast, flexible and effective information sharing and responsiveness.  This
 will allow a global and far more consistent approach to managing the
 integration of new products and releases within our environment."
 
     Return on Investment
     John Cartwright, program manager, Supply Chain Applications, Mergers,
 Acquisitions and Outsourcing for Intel, said he estimates that use of the
 proposed data exchange standards will yield significant return on investment
 for both OEMs and EMS providers.
     "Historically, major OEMs had to install leased lines directly into their
 trading partners' manufacturing facilities in order to transfer files
 securely.  This required firewalls, servers and dedicated personnel to handle
 the validation and entry of information into the manufacturer's internal bill
 of materials management system," Cartwright said.  "Two years ago, this kind
 of system could run as much as $350K in set-up costs and more than $100K in
 annual fees.  That's on the OEM side.  Then there are additional costs on the
 EMS side to install and maintain each proprietary system.  If you take this
 cost scenario and multiply it times the number of major trading partners EMS
 companies have to deal with, the result is millions of dollars spent annually
 on proprietary set-ups and maintenance."
 
     Demonstration Details
     In the prototype demo, proposed RosettaNet Partner Interface Processes(TM)
 (PIPs(TM)) 2C1 through 2C6 and the proposed IPC-2578 standard were used to
 support data interchange between two OEMs (represented by Nortel Networks and
 Intel), two EMS providers (represented by SCI Systems and Georgia Tech) and a
 supplier (represented by NIST).
     The demo specifically showed how the PDX standards and the related
 RosettaNet PIPs can be used in concert to initiate a new product build and
 implement engineering change requests.  Both the RosettaNet and IPC standards
 provide an XML (extensible mark-up language) encoding scheme that enables a
 total product definition to be encoded at a level appropriate to facilitate
 supply chain interactions.
     In the demo, the OEMs sent two different bill of materials (BOMs) to each
 of the EMS providers, and the BOMs were loaded into the respective systems.
 In addition, the supplier initiated an engineering change request, which was
 communicated back through the EMS providers to the OEMs.  The significance of
 these interactions is that they were accomplished using three different
 gateway products and the participants were loading the BOM information into
 different back-end systems.
     For demonstration purposes, Nortel Networks ran its own internal system
 plus PTC's Windchill Gateway for RosettaNet to pass the PIPs; while Intel used
 an internal system and Extricity B2B(TM).  The two EMS providers made use of
 Netfish Technologies' XDI Server plus Agile solutions -- Agile Integration
 Server(TM) and Agile Anywhere(TM) -- for implementation of the PIPs (including
 transport and security) and for implementation of BOM load and change
 management.  Similarly, NIST (as the supplier) used the Netfish XDI Server as
 well as their own query engine -- based on other RosettaNet PIPs -- to access
 component information.  Although not shown in the demo, these standards can
 also capture and transfer post-production product configuration data and are
 being enhanced to include quality reports.
 
     Background & History
     The prototype demonstration leveraged thousands of hours of work by some
 of the industry's leading OEMs, EMS providers, solution providers, plus
 government and academia.  Through NEMI's Virtual Factory Project, these
 organizations joined forces to develop standards that would help shorten the
 time and reduce the cost required to establish and maintain information
 exchange partnerships across the electronics manufacturing supply web.
 Project participation continues to increase, and current members include OEMs
 (Intel Corporation, Lucent Technologies and Nortel Networks), EMS providers
 (Celestica, Inc., SCI Systems, Inc. and Solectron Corporation), vendors and
 solution providers (Agile Software Corporation, Extricity Inc., GenRad Inc.,
 META Group, Netfish Technologies Inc., PTC, Universal Instruments and Valor
 Computerized Systems), plus government (NIST) and university members (Georgia
 Tech).
     Building on project participant Agile's exchange model, VFIIP developed a
 series of product data exchange (PDX) specifications to enable supply chain
 partners to exchange manufacturing and as-built product information.  NEMI is
 collaborating with IPC, which created the IPC 2570 series of standards
 specifically for the PDX specifications.  NEMI has also established a
 partnership with RosettaNet, which is integrating the PDX standard suite into
 its Cluster 2 (standards relating to product information) and Cluster 7
 (standards relating to manufacturing).
     Intel's Cartwright is a leader of NEMI's Virtual Factory Project and also
 product manager for RosettaNet's Clusters 2 and 7 as well as program manager
 of Discrete Manufacturing.  He says that a significant benefit resulting from
 the close coordination between VFIIP, RosettaNet and IPC is the consistency of
 naming conventions and structure between the IPC and RosettaNet standards.
 "We wanted to be sure that we did not end up with competing and conflicting
 specifications for exchanging the same type of information," he said.  "By
 harmonizing the IPC standards with the RosettaNet PIPs, we are able to give
 industry a clear and unambiguous way of exchanging information that requires a
 single port of the exchange software rather than a different solution for each
 trading partner.  That's a really big win.  RosettaNet has even created its
 PIPs so that the IPC standards can be directly attached.  It doesn't get more
 integrated than that."
     The RosettaNet and IPC standards will enable trading partners to exchange
 and manage the following:
 
     * Load bill of materials (BOM) information (without manual mistakes).
     * Manage approved vendor list (AVL) and approved manufacturer list (AML)
        information.
     * Update and track approvals of engineering change orders (ECOs).
     * Report work in process information in real time.
     * Distribute warranty entitlement information from "as-built"
        manufacturing information.
     * Track quality information within the manufacturing process.
     * Create and distribute quality alerts to contain any manufacturing
       excursions.
     * Load catalog information for use in BOMs and to respond to requests for
        quotes.
     * Include engineering notes, CAD/CAM design information, or other
        information that can be attached and used in the decision-making
        processes.
 
     IPC-2578 is one of three PDX standards currently available for industry
 comment, and IPC is targeting this June for final release.  The RosettaNet 2C1
 through 2C6 PIPs were recently voted on and have been released.
 
     Trademark Notes:
     Agile Software, Agile Anywhere and Agile Integration Server are trademarks
 of Agile Software Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries.
     Extricity and Extricity B2B are trademarks of Extricity, Inc.
     PTC and Windchill are trademarks or registered trademarks of Parametric
 Technology Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and in other
 countries.
     SCI is a registered trademark of SCI Systems, Inc.
     All other brand or product names are trademarks and registered trademarks
 of their respective holders.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X93689204
 
 SOURCE  National Electronics Manufacturing Initiative