Expectant Parents in Akron Can Rest Easier with New Fetal Oxygen Monitoring System

Apr 05, 2001, 01:00 ET from Summa Health System

    AKRON, Ohio, April 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Summa Health System in Akron, Ohio,
 now has new medical technology that uses light to measure the amount of oxygen
 in the baby's blood during labor and delivery.  With the technology less than
 a year old, Summa purchased the equipment from Nellcor, who developed the
 OxiFirst system.  The new technology provides a more complete and accurate
 assessment of the baby's condition in the womb than has ever existed.
     John W. Stewart, M.D., a maternal-fetal medicine specialist at Summa
 Health System shared the benefits.  "This is an excellent technology that
 reduces the number of cesareans significantly without additional risk to the
 baby or the mother."  He added that, "the mother benefits because with the new
 technology it helps her to avoid unnecessary surgery.  The baby benefits as
 well because we can monitor the amount of oxygen the baby is receiving all the
 time without making small incisions in the baby's scalp."
     Clinical studies demonstrate that fetal oxygen monitoring, used in
 conjunction with fetal heart rate monitoring -- a standard of care for more
 than 30 years -- provides additional information about the baby's status that
 enables the obstetrician, midwife and parents to decide whether labor can
 progress safely through periods of abnormal heart beats or if an intervention
 is needed.
     "As a obstetrical nurse for more than 20 years, I am excited about this
 new technology," said Joyce Thompson, RNC, nurse manager.  "In about
 30 percent of all labors, the FHR pattern becomes abnormal at some point in
 time.  The obstetrical staff struggles to determine when a "non-reassuring"
 fetal heart rate is due to lack of oxygen or when it's not a problem and labor
 should be allowed to continue."
     Vicki Weeter-Crawford is thankful for Summa's new technology.  "When my
 baby was in distress because the umbilical cord was wrapped around its neck my
 baby's heart rate went down tremendously.  But with the fetal monitoring
 system, I didn't have to have an emergency C-section because they were able to
 detect the problem and monitor my baby's oxygen level and heart rate."
 
 

SOURCE Summa Health System
    AKRON, Ohio, April 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Summa Health System in Akron, Ohio,
 now has new medical technology that uses light to measure the amount of oxygen
 in the baby's blood during labor and delivery.  With the technology less than
 a year old, Summa purchased the equipment from Nellcor, who developed the
 OxiFirst system.  The new technology provides a more complete and accurate
 assessment of the baby's condition in the womb than has ever existed.
     John W. Stewart, M.D., a maternal-fetal medicine specialist at Summa
 Health System shared the benefits.  "This is an excellent technology that
 reduces the number of cesareans significantly without additional risk to the
 baby or the mother."  He added that, "the mother benefits because with the new
 technology it helps her to avoid unnecessary surgery.  The baby benefits as
 well because we can monitor the amount of oxygen the baby is receiving all the
 time without making small incisions in the baby's scalp."
     Clinical studies demonstrate that fetal oxygen monitoring, used in
 conjunction with fetal heart rate monitoring -- a standard of care for more
 than 30 years -- provides additional information about the baby's status that
 enables the obstetrician, midwife and parents to decide whether labor can
 progress safely through periods of abnormal heart beats or if an intervention
 is needed.
     "As a obstetrical nurse for more than 20 years, I am excited about this
 new technology," said Joyce Thompson, RNC, nurse manager.  "In about
 30 percent of all labors, the FHR pattern becomes abnormal at some point in
 time.  The obstetrical staff struggles to determine when a "non-reassuring"
 fetal heart rate is due to lack of oxygen or when it's not a problem and labor
 should be allowed to continue."
     Vicki Weeter-Crawford is thankful for Summa's new technology.  "When my
 baby was in distress because the umbilical cord was wrapped around its neck my
 baby's heart rate went down tremendously.  But with the fetal monitoring
 system, I didn't have to have an emergency C-section because they were able to
 detect the problem and monitor my baby's oxygen level and heart rate."
 
 SOURCE  Summa Health System