Featured Articles from BusinessWeek Online's Daily Briefing

Apr 04, 2001, 01:00 ET from BusinessWeek Online

    NEW YORK, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- The full version of the following
 articles are currently available on BusinessWeek Online's Daily Briefing
 (http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily?c=bwprnewsapr4&n=link1&t=email).
 
     COMMENTARY: Why Amazon's Board Is Part of the Problem
 http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/apr2001/nf2001044_127.htm?c=bwprne
 wsapr4&n=link2&t=email
 
     What, Jeff Bezos worry? As Amazon.com's (AMZ) stock has sunk from $75 to
 $10 per share over the past year and losses and debts have soared into the
 billions, the smiling e-commerce maestro has remained largely unscathed. In
 fact, the charismatic Bezos continues to reassure investors and his
 board of directors that all's well that ends well. But a happy ending to
 Amazon's swoon is far from certain. Several lawsuits have been filed in the
 last month, alleging that the e-tailer distributed false and misleading
 information to investors. Meanwhile, Amazon's board is facing mounting
 criticism for apparently never having questioned Bezos on strategy, judgment,
 or financial matters. Amazon's skeptics say the board is too small, too
 clubby, and lacks the necessary independence to make serious judgment or
 interventions in Amazon affairs.
 
     NEWSMAKER Q&A: A Talk with China's Banking Chief
 http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/apr2001/nf2001044_717.htm?c=bwprne
 wsapr4&n=link3&t=email
 
     In a rare and wide-ranging interview on Mar. 27 with BusinessWeek editors
 in Beijing, Dai evinced confidence that China could hit its 7% GDP growth
 target for 2001. Domestic demand, particularly through the heavy fiscal
 stimulus the government is using to develop the western part of the country,
 will continue to power the economy, he contends. At People's Bank of China
 headquarters, Dai sat down to chat with BusinessWeek Editor-in-Chief Stephen
 B. Shepard, Asia Regional Editor Mark L. Clifford, and Beijing Bureau Chief
 Dexter Roberts.
 
     NEWS ANALYSIS: Musicians to Congress: What About Us?
 http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/apr2001/nf2001044_327.htm?c=bwprne
 wsapr4&n=link4&t=email
 
     Seems the copyright laws don't explicitly state that artists are entitled
 to royalties from interactive broadcasts -- and that includes the downloading
 of digital music. That made for an interesting discussion on Apr. 3, when the
 Recording Artists Coalition (RAC) -- the largest group representing musical
 artists in the debate -- presented testimony before the Senate Judiciary
 Committee in Washington, D.C. Until now, few artists have spoken out about how
 record labels are tapping the Internet's potential. But as the hearing
 unfolded, it became clear that record labels and artists -- both of whom see
 dollar signs on the Net -- have vastly different notions of how licensing
 deals between music Web services like Napster and record labels should be
 carved out.
 
 

SOURCE BusinessWeek Online
    NEW YORK, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- The full version of the following
 articles are currently available on BusinessWeek Online's Daily Briefing
 (http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily?c=bwprnewsapr4&n=link1&t=email).
 
     COMMENTARY: Why Amazon's Board Is Part of the Problem
 http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/apr2001/nf2001044_127.htm?c=bwprne
 wsapr4&n=link2&t=email
 
     What, Jeff Bezos worry? As Amazon.com's (AMZ) stock has sunk from $75 to
 $10 per share over the past year and losses and debts have soared into the
 billions, the smiling e-commerce maestro has remained largely unscathed. In
 fact, the charismatic Bezos continues to reassure investors and his
 board of directors that all's well that ends well. But a happy ending to
 Amazon's swoon is far from certain. Several lawsuits have been filed in the
 last month, alleging that the e-tailer distributed false and misleading
 information to investors. Meanwhile, Amazon's board is facing mounting
 criticism for apparently never having questioned Bezos on strategy, judgment,
 or financial matters. Amazon's skeptics say the board is too small, too
 clubby, and lacks the necessary independence to make serious judgment or
 interventions in Amazon affairs.
 
     NEWSMAKER Q&A: A Talk with China's Banking Chief
 http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/apr2001/nf2001044_717.htm?c=bwprne
 wsapr4&n=link3&t=email
 
     In a rare and wide-ranging interview on Mar. 27 with BusinessWeek editors
 in Beijing, Dai evinced confidence that China could hit its 7% GDP growth
 target for 2001. Domestic demand, particularly through the heavy fiscal
 stimulus the government is using to develop the western part of the country,
 will continue to power the economy, he contends. At People's Bank of China
 headquarters, Dai sat down to chat with BusinessWeek Editor-in-Chief Stephen
 B. Shepard, Asia Regional Editor Mark L. Clifford, and Beijing Bureau Chief
 Dexter Roberts.
 
     NEWS ANALYSIS: Musicians to Congress: What About Us?
 http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/apr2001/nf2001044_327.htm?c=bwprne
 wsapr4&n=link4&t=email
 
     Seems the copyright laws don't explicitly state that artists are entitled
 to royalties from interactive broadcasts -- and that includes the downloading
 of digital music. That made for an interesting discussion on Apr. 3, when the
 Recording Artists Coalition (RAC) -- the largest group representing musical
 artists in the debate -- presented testimony before the Senate Judiciary
 Committee in Washington, D.C. Until now, few artists have spoken out about how
 record labels are tapping the Internet's potential. But as the hearing
 unfolded, it became clear that record labels and artists -- both of whom see
 dollar signs on the Net -- have vastly different notions of how licensing
 deals between music Web services like Napster and record labels should be
 carved out.
 
 SOURCE  BusinessWeek Online