Featured Articles from BusinessWeek Online's Daily Briefing

Apr 10, 2001, 01:00 ET from BusinessWeek Online

    NEW YORK, April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The full version of the following
 articles are currently available on BusinessWeek Online's Daily Briefing
 (http://www.businessweek.com?c=bwprnewsapr10&n=link1&t=email)
 
     NEWS ANALYSIS: Online Brokers: And Then There Were ...
 http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/apr2001/nf20010410_050.htm?c=bwprnewsapr10&n=link2&t=email
     Stung by sharp declines in the stock market, online brokerages are
 reeling. After three years of heady growth fueled by massive gains on Wall
 Street, monthly trading volumes at all the major companies tumbled
 10% to 22% in February. March numbers aren't expected to be much better.
 Discount brokers have reacted with drastic measures. Industry leader Charles
 Schwab (SCH) stunned Wall Street on Mar. 22 by axing up to 3,400, or 13% of
 its employees. That came close on the heels of CSFBdirect's 10% staff cuts on
 Mar. 14. Many see these latest developments as early signs of a shakeout in
 the industry.
 
     WASHINGTON WATCH: How Bush Blew the Budget
 http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/apr2001/nf20010410_320.htm?c=bwprnewsapr10&n=link3&t=email
     In an effort to railroad his budget through Congress, the President
 thought he could roll Senate Democrats and moderate Republicans. After all, he
 figured, he could rely on 50 Republicans and Vice-President Dick
 Cheney to break ties. All he had to do was put enough heat on wavering
 Republicans and they would cave, Dubya believed. Fat chance, and Bush paid a
 stiff price for his naivete. Days before he sent his budget blueprint
 up to Capitol Hill, the Senate rewrote it. Not only could Bush not get his
 $1.6 trillion tax cut through the Senate, he couldn't get any changes to a
 bipartisan $1.25 trillion version offered by John Breaux (D-La.).
 
     EYE ON JAPAN: The U.S. Vs. China: What About Japan?
 http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/apr2001/nf20010410_616.htm?c=bwprnewsapr10&n=link4&t=email
     The dynamics of power among Japan, the U.S., and China have changed
 considerably. Japan has lost tremendous economic and international clout over
 the past decade. China is an ascending power. One of the lessons of the
 recent downing of a U.S. spy plane is that the Middle Kingdom clearly intends
 to be the premier military player in Asia. Its economy is far smaller than
 Japan's $4.2 trillion, but it will draw much closer in size and
 sophistication over the next couple of decades. Click the abacus of national
 self-interest in Tokyo, and any thought of a go-it-along strategy or sudden
 embrace of China looks pretty farfetched.
 
 

SOURCE BusinessWeek Online
    NEW YORK, April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The full version of the following
 articles are currently available on BusinessWeek Online's Daily Briefing
 (http://www.businessweek.com?c=bwprnewsapr10&n=link1&t=email)
 
     NEWS ANALYSIS: Online Brokers: And Then There Were ...
 http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/apr2001/nf20010410_050.htm?c=bwprnewsapr10&n=link2&t=email
     Stung by sharp declines in the stock market, online brokerages are
 reeling. After three years of heady growth fueled by massive gains on Wall
 Street, monthly trading volumes at all the major companies tumbled
 10% to 22% in February. March numbers aren't expected to be much better.
 Discount brokers have reacted with drastic measures. Industry leader Charles
 Schwab (SCH) stunned Wall Street on Mar. 22 by axing up to 3,400, or 13% of
 its employees. That came close on the heels of CSFBdirect's 10% staff cuts on
 Mar. 14. Many see these latest developments as early signs of a shakeout in
 the industry.
 
     WASHINGTON WATCH: How Bush Blew the Budget
 http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/apr2001/nf20010410_320.htm?c=bwprnewsapr10&n=link3&t=email
     In an effort to railroad his budget through Congress, the President
 thought he could roll Senate Democrats and moderate Republicans. After all, he
 figured, he could rely on 50 Republicans and Vice-President Dick
 Cheney to break ties. All he had to do was put enough heat on wavering
 Republicans and they would cave, Dubya believed. Fat chance, and Bush paid a
 stiff price for his naivete. Days before he sent his budget blueprint
 up to Capitol Hill, the Senate rewrote it. Not only could Bush not get his
 $1.6 trillion tax cut through the Senate, he couldn't get any changes to a
 bipartisan $1.25 trillion version offered by John Breaux (D-La.).
 
     EYE ON JAPAN: The U.S. Vs. China: What About Japan?
 http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/apr2001/nf20010410_616.htm?c=bwprnewsapr10&n=link4&t=email
     The dynamics of power among Japan, the U.S., and China have changed
 considerably. Japan has lost tremendous economic and international clout over
 the past decade. China is an ascending power. One of the lessons of the
 recent downing of a U.S. spy plane is that the Middle Kingdom clearly intends
 to be the premier military player in Asia. Its economy is far smaller than
 Japan's $4.2 trillion, but it will draw much closer in size and
 sophistication over the next couple of decades. Click the abacus of national
 self-interest in Tokyo, and any thought of a go-it-along strategy or sudden
 embrace of China looks pretty farfetched.
 
 SOURCE  BusinessWeek Online