Federation Calls for Fat Free Earth Day

Offers Tips to Prevent Fats, Oils, and Greases

From Damaging Homes, Environment



Apr 18, 2001, 01:00 ET from Water Environment Federation

    ALEXANDRIA, Va., April 18 /PRNewswire/ -- Fats, oils, and grease ruin more
 than just arteries and waistlines; they're bad for sewers and drains, too,
 according to the Water Environment Federation (WEF), a technical and
 educational group of water quality experts.  WEF issued this special advisory
 to homeowners and restaurants for Earth Day 2001 because grease -- from
 household drains and poorly maintained grease traps in restaurants -- is an
 increasingly common cause of sewer overflows and backups.
     "Sewer overflows can cause health hazards, damage homes, and threaten the
 environment," said Water Environment Federation President Joe Stowe, Jr.  "As
 dedicated custodians of the environment, the Federation's nearly 40,000
 members around the world urge consumers to make an Earth Day pledge to help
 solve the grease problem and reduce or prevent overflows of raw sewage."
     In addition to raw sewage overflowing in homes and neighborhoods, the
 consequences of sewer pipes blocked by grease include potential contact with
 disease-causing organisms, and an increase in operation and maintenance costs
 for local sewer departments, which causes higher sewer bills for customers.
     Consumers can put the following four tips into practice to keep grease out
 of the sewer system in the first place:
 
     *  Never pour cooking grease down sink drains or into toilets.
 
     *  Scrape grease and food scraps from plates, pots, pans, and grills into
        a can or the trash for disposal (or recycling where available).
 
     *  Do not put grease down garbage disposals.  Put baskets/strainers in
        sink drains to catch food scraps and other solids, and empty the drain
        baskets/strainers into the trash.
 
     *  Speak with friends and neighbors about the problem of grease in the
        sewer system and how to keep it out.
 
     For more information, and to receive a complimentary "Fat-Free Sewers"
 brochure, visit the WEF Web site at http://www.wef.org and click on the "Fat
 Free Sewers" logo.
 
     Founded in 1928, the Water Environment Federation (WEF) is a not-for-
 profit technical and educational organization with members from varied
 disciplines who work toward the WEF vision of preservation and enhancement of
 the global water environment.  The WEF network includes more than 100,000
 water quality professionals from 77 Member Associations in 31 countries.
 Visit http://www.wef.org .
 
 

SOURCE Water Environment Federation
    ALEXANDRIA, Va., April 18 /PRNewswire/ -- Fats, oils, and grease ruin more
 than just arteries and waistlines; they're bad for sewers and drains, too,
 according to the Water Environment Federation (WEF), a technical and
 educational group of water quality experts.  WEF issued this special advisory
 to homeowners and restaurants for Earth Day 2001 because grease -- from
 household drains and poorly maintained grease traps in restaurants -- is an
 increasingly common cause of sewer overflows and backups.
     "Sewer overflows can cause health hazards, damage homes, and threaten the
 environment," said Water Environment Federation President Joe Stowe, Jr.  "As
 dedicated custodians of the environment, the Federation's nearly 40,000
 members around the world urge consumers to make an Earth Day pledge to help
 solve the grease problem and reduce or prevent overflows of raw sewage."
     In addition to raw sewage overflowing in homes and neighborhoods, the
 consequences of sewer pipes blocked by grease include potential contact with
 disease-causing organisms, and an increase in operation and maintenance costs
 for local sewer departments, which causes higher sewer bills for customers.
     Consumers can put the following four tips into practice to keep grease out
 of the sewer system in the first place:
 
     *  Never pour cooking grease down sink drains or into toilets.
 
     *  Scrape grease and food scraps from plates, pots, pans, and grills into
        a can or the trash for disposal (or recycling where available).
 
     *  Do not put grease down garbage disposals.  Put baskets/strainers in
        sink drains to catch food scraps and other solids, and empty the drain
        baskets/strainers into the trash.
 
     *  Speak with friends and neighbors about the problem of grease in the
        sewer system and how to keep it out.
 
     For more information, and to receive a complimentary "Fat-Free Sewers"
 brochure, visit the WEF Web site at http://www.wef.org and click on the "Fat
 Free Sewers" logo.
 
     Founded in 1928, the Water Environment Federation (WEF) is a not-for-
 profit technical and educational organization with members from varied
 disciplines who work toward the WEF vision of preservation and enhancement of
 the global water environment.  The WEF network includes more than 100,000
 water quality professionals from 77 Member Associations in 31 countries.
 Visit http://www.wef.org .
 
 SOURCE  Water Environment Federation