First Study Reports Results of Successful Non-Invasive Treatment for Prostate Cancer and Details Marked Benefits Over Current Surgical and Radiation Treatments

Prostate Cancer Patients Have New Medical Treatment



In the April, 2001 Issue of 'The Oncologist,' Triple Hormone Blockade Was

Assessed Among 110 Prostate Cancer Patients With Mean PSA Scores of 13.2.

Today, all Patients are Off Treatment With Prostates Intact, Without Having

Undergone Radiation Therapy or Surgery. The Longest Follow Up is 10 years.

No Patient Reported Permanent Side Effects After Treatment Concluded and To

Date, None Required Re-Treatment. Physician Originator Says Treatment Marks

'The Beginning of the End of Surgical Removal of the Prostate.'



Apr 18, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Oncologist

    LOS ANGELES, April 18 /PRNewswire/ -- For the nearly 180,000 prostate
 cancer patients diagnosed this year, current medical options include watchful
 waiting, radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy to surgically remove the
 cancerous prostate.  Recent studies indicate that such invasive treatments can
 cure some men but this cure comes at a heavy price to the patient including
 risk of permanent urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence and/or impotence.
 During the past two years, several medical studies have pointed out the high
 failure rates of these therapies, as well as the increasing percentage of
 patients left with permanent side effects and drastically altered quality of
 life.  Nearly 32,000 men die of the disease in the U.S. each year.
     For more than 50 years, hormone blockade therapy has been used only as
 treatment for patients whose invasive treatments failed or who were initially
 diagnosed with metastasized prostate cancer.  Until now, that is.  For the
 first time, this study explains how triple hormone blockade alone successfully
 treats patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer
 without surgery or radiation therapy.
     With the publication of this study detailing the treatment of prostate
 cancer with only 13-months of a three-drug hormone blockade protocol in the
 April, 2001 issue of the peer-reviewed medical journal The Oncologist, it
 appears men now have another viable medical option in their war against this
 disease.
     "With convincing evidence of a real alternative now at hand, I believe
 this will be the beginning of the end of radical prostatectomy as the gold
 standard for treating prostate cancer," concluded Robert Leibowitz, M.D.,
 originator of the triple hormone blockade as sole treatment for the disease.
 Dr. Leibowitz is a board-certified hematologist/oncologist in Los Angeles,
 Calif. sub-specializing in the treatment of prostate cancer.  He is also a
 former clinical instructor and research fellow at the Harvard Medical School.
     Dr. Leibowitz conducted the evaluation of 110 consecutive patients to
 determine the effectiveness of triple androgen blockade as an alternative to
 such options as radiation or surgery for those with clinically localized or
 locally advanced prostate cancer.  The content of the study shows the
 following:  For an average of 13 months, patients were treated with a
 three-drug androgen blockade regimen that blocks production of male sex
 hormones (testosterone).  Treatment included the use of injectible luetenizing
 hormone-releasing hormone agonist every 28 days, daily oral doses of
 antiandrogen plus daily oral doses of finasteride.  Oral finasteride is the
 only maintenance therapy.
     "We use the same hormone-blocking medicines that urologists or radiation
 therapists use after their treatments fail," noted Dr. Leibowitz.  "We just do
 it sooner."
     On average, patients were age 67 with a PSA of 13.2 and Gleason score of
 6.6.  No patient in the study had undergone radiation or surgery.  It took
 patients approximately three months to achieve undetectable PSA levels.  For
 the first 57 patients who completed treatment, the average PSA is 1.88 with a
 median follow up of nearly five years.  For all patients currently off
 treatment, the average PSA score is 1.3. As of Oct., 2000, no patient in this
 series has required re-treatment.
     An enormous benefit of triple hormone blockade is that it can successfully
 treat cancer cells that may have escaped from the prostate, wherever they are
 in the body.  The authors believe cancer cells are already outside of the
 prostate in well more than half of all men diagnosed with prostate cancer
 today.
     During treatment, most patients reported temporary symptoms associated
 with triple hormone blockade therapy including hot flashes, loss of libido and
 impotence.  Upon treatment conclusion, such symptoms almost always reversed.
 On average, patients started treatment with a baseline testosterone of
 373 that was clinically taken down to zero.  One year after treatment ended,
 average testosterone levels were higher than before treatment began and
 averaged 412.
     The most promising news from this evaluation is that 100% of patients
 treated achieved undetectable PSA levels while on short-term triple hormone
 blockade.  Following treatment, most patients achieved a "stable PSA plateau"
 rather than continuously rising PSA numbers.  Dr. Leibowitz notes that with
 this report and others, a reassessment of currently accepted options for
 treating localized prostate cancer is essential.  He also calls for
 prospective, randomized clinical trials to evaluate hormone blockade therapy
 alone compared to surgery or radiation therapy.
     "We are hopeful that this study will help men understand that they have
 more treatment options than they think when diagnosed with prostate cancer,"
 says Dr. Leibowitz.  "Triple hormone blockade is a viable therapy for
 thousands of men, and starting today, they should be made aware of this option
 when deciding how to treat their disease."
     For the full text of this study, please go to the journal's current issue
 on their website at www.theoncologist.com.  For a list of patients from across
 the nation and internationally who have successfully been treated with triple
 hormone blockade or to reach Dr. Leibowitz directly, please call 310/229-3555.
 
 

SOURCE The Oncologist
    LOS ANGELES, April 18 /PRNewswire/ -- For the nearly 180,000 prostate
 cancer patients diagnosed this year, current medical options include watchful
 waiting, radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy to surgically remove the
 cancerous prostate.  Recent studies indicate that such invasive treatments can
 cure some men but this cure comes at a heavy price to the patient including
 risk of permanent urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence and/or impotence.
 During the past two years, several medical studies have pointed out the high
 failure rates of these therapies, as well as the increasing percentage of
 patients left with permanent side effects and drastically altered quality of
 life.  Nearly 32,000 men die of the disease in the U.S. each year.
     For more than 50 years, hormone blockade therapy has been used only as
 treatment for patients whose invasive treatments failed or who were initially
 diagnosed with metastasized prostate cancer.  Until now, that is.  For the
 first time, this study explains how triple hormone blockade alone successfully
 treats patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer
 without surgery or radiation therapy.
     With the publication of this study detailing the treatment of prostate
 cancer with only 13-months of a three-drug hormone blockade protocol in the
 April, 2001 issue of the peer-reviewed medical journal The Oncologist, it
 appears men now have another viable medical option in their war against this
 disease.
     "With convincing evidence of a real alternative now at hand, I believe
 this will be the beginning of the end of radical prostatectomy as the gold
 standard for treating prostate cancer," concluded Robert Leibowitz, M.D.,
 originator of the triple hormone blockade as sole treatment for the disease.
 Dr. Leibowitz is a board-certified hematologist/oncologist in Los Angeles,
 Calif. sub-specializing in the treatment of prostate cancer.  He is also a
 former clinical instructor and research fellow at the Harvard Medical School.
     Dr. Leibowitz conducted the evaluation of 110 consecutive patients to
 determine the effectiveness of triple androgen blockade as an alternative to
 such options as radiation or surgery for those with clinically localized or
 locally advanced prostate cancer.  The content of the study shows the
 following:  For an average of 13 months, patients were treated with a
 three-drug androgen blockade regimen that blocks production of male sex
 hormones (testosterone).  Treatment included the use of injectible luetenizing
 hormone-releasing hormone agonist every 28 days, daily oral doses of
 antiandrogen plus daily oral doses of finasteride.  Oral finasteride is the
 only maintenance therapy.
     "We use the same hormone-blocking medicines that urologists or radiation
 therapists use after their treatments fail," noted Dr. Leibowitz.  "We just do
 it sooner."
     On average, patients were age 67 with a PSA of 13.2 and Gleason score of
 6.6.  No patient in the study had undergone radiation or surgery.  It took
 patients approximately three months to achieve undetectable PSA levels.  For
 the first 57 patients who completed treatment, the average PSA is 1.88 with a
 median follow up of nearly five years.  For all patients currently off
 treatment, the average PSA score is 1.3. As of Oct., 2000, no patient in this
 series has required re-treatment.
     An enormous benefit of triple hormone blockade is that it can successfully
 treat cancer cells that may have escaped from the prostate, wherever they are
 in the body.  The authors believe cancer cells are already outside of the
 prostate in well more than half of all men diagnosed with prostate cancer
 today.
     During treatment, most patients reported temporary symptoms associated
 with triple hormone blockade therapy including hot flashes, loss of libido and
 impotence.  Upon treatment conclusion, such symptoms almost always reversed.
 On average, patients started treatment with a baseline testosterone of
 373 that was clinically taken down to zero.  One year after treatment ended,
 average testosterone levels were higher than before treatment began and
 averaged 412.
     The most promising news from this evaluation is that 100% of patients
 treated achieved undetectable PSA levels while on short-term triple hormone
 blockade.  Following treatment, most patients achieved a "stable PSA plateau"
 rather than continuously rising PSA numbers.  Dr. Leibowitz notes that with
 this report and others, a reassessment of currently accepted options for
 treating localized prostate cancer is essential.  He also calls for
 prospective, randomized clinical trials to evaluate hormone blockade therapy
 alone compared to surgery or radiation therapy.
     "We are hopeful that this study will help men understand that they have
 more treatment options than they think when diagnosed with prostate cancer,"
 says Dr. Leibowitz.  "Triple hormone blockade is a viable therapy for
 thousands of men, and starting today, they should be made aware of this option
 when deciding how to treat their disease."
     For the full text of this study, please go to the journal's current issue
 on their website at www.theoncologist.com.  For a list of patients from across
 the nation and internationally who have successfully been treated with triple
 hormone blockade or to reach Dr. Leibowitz directly, please call 310/229-3555.
 
 SOURCE  The Oncologist