Food Experts Provide Egg-Cellent Tips for a Safe Easter Celebration

Apr 05, 2001, 01:00 ET from American Dietetic Association and ConAgra Foods Inc.

    CHICAGO, April 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Hard-boiled, dyed and decorated: at
 Easter time, eggs take center stage.  The American Dietetic Association (ADA)
 and the ConAgra Foundation recommend the following egg safety guidelines to
 help ensure an enjoyable Easter celebration.
     "Open cartons of eggs before you buy.  Avoid cartons with cracked eggs,"
 says registered dietitian and ADA spokesperson Cindy Moore. "Whether
 preparing, serving or hunting for eggs, it's easy for everyone to have a good
 time and stay safe."
     Like other high-protein foods, eggs shouldn't sit out at temperatures of
 40 degrees Fahrenheit or higher for longer than two hours. "To minimize health
 risks, cook two sets of eggs -- one for an Easter egg hunt and the other for
 eating.  That way, the eggs you are eating can stay properly refrigerated,"
 says Moore.
     Here are some additional important Easter egg-safety tips from ADA and the
 ConAgra Foundation:
 
     -- Wash hands thoroughly in warm, soapy water for about 20 seconds before
        handling eggs at every preparation step - cooking, cooling, dyeing and
        hiding.
 
     -- Keep eggs, raw meats and ready-to-eat foods separate. "Starting in your
        grocery cart, keep eggs and other foods separate from raw meat, fish,
        seafood and poultry," Moore says. At home, refrigerate eggs in their
        cartons, keeping them away from meat that might drip juices or produce
        that might come into contact with eggshells.
 
     -- Cook to proper temperatures. Avoid eating raw or undercooked eggs. To
        ensure doneness, cook egg dishes such as quiche or casseroles to
        160 degrees Fahrenheit. It's best to cook eggs slowly on the stovetop
        over gentle heat. Cook eggs until yolks are firm and not runny.
 
     -- Refrigerate promptly below 40 degrees Fahrenheit. "Discard any Easter
        eggs that have been unrefrigerated for more than two hours," Moore
        says.  "Hard-boiled eggs, in the shell or peeled, can be stored for up
        to a week.  Keep them on a shelf inside the refrigerator, not in the
        door."
 
     ADA and ConAgra Foods are partners in Home Food Safety ... It's in Your
 Hands(TM), a nationwide program designed to educate consumers and provide them
 with solutions for easily and safely handling food in their own kitchens.  The
 program complements government-sponsored food safety initiatives that speak to
 leading food-handling problems.
     For more information, visit www.homefoodsafety.org or call ADA's Consumer
 Nutrition Information Line at 800-366-1655, where recorded messages, in both
 English and Spanish, are available 24 hours a day.
     The 70,000-member American Dietetic Association is the largest
 organization of food and nutrition professionals in the nation. With
 headquarters in Chicago, ADA serves the public by promoting optimal nutrition,
 health and well-being.
     ConAgra Foods Inc. (NYSE:   CAG) is one of the world's largest and most
 successful food companies. ConAgra Foods is North America's largest
 foodservice manufacturer and second-largest retail food supplier. This program
 is funded by the ConAgra Foundation, the philanthropic arm of ConAgra Foods,
 which works to improve the quality of life in communities across the U.S.
 
     CONTACT:  Lori Ferme of the American Dietetic Association, 800-877-1600,
 ext. 4802; Alison Baseley of Edelman Public Relations, 312-240-2848.
 
 

SOURCE American Dietetic Association and ConAgra Foods Inc.
    CHICAGO, April 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Hard-boiled, dyed and decorated: at
 Easter time, eggs take center stage.  The American Dietetic Association (ADA)
 and the ConAgra Foundation recommend the following egg safety guidelines to
 help ensure an enjoyable Easter celebration.
     "Open cartons of eggs before you buy.  Avoid cartons with cracked eggs,"
 says registered dietitian and ADA spokesperson Cindy Moore. "Whether
 preparing, serving or hunting for eggs, it's easy for everyone to have a good
 time and stay safe."
     Like other high-protein foods, eggs shouldn't sit out at temperatures of
 40 degrees Fahrenheit or higher for longer than two hours. "To minimize health
 risks, cook two sets of eggs -- one for an Easter egg hunt and the other for
 eating.  That way, the eggs you are eating can stay properly refrigerated,"
 says Moore.
     Here are some additional important Easter egg-safety tips from ADA and the
 ConAgra Foundation:
 
     -- Wash hands thoroughly in warm, soapy water for about 20 seconds before
        handling eggs at every preparation step - cooking, cooling, dyeing and
        hiding.
 
     -- Keep eggs, raw meats and ready-to-eat foods separate. "Starting in your
        grocery cart, keep eggs and other foods separate from raw meat, fish,
        seafood and poultry," Moore says. At home, refrigerate eggs in their
        cartons, keeping them away from meat that might drip juices or produce
        that might come into contact with eggshells.
 
     -- Cook to proper temperatures. Avoid eating raw or undercooked eggs. To
        ensure doneness, cook egg dishes such as quiche or casseroles to
        160 degrees Fahrenheit. It's best to cook eggs slowly on the stovetop
        over gentle heat. Cook eggs until yolks are firm and not runny.
 
     -- Refrigerate promptly below 40 degrees Fahrenheit. "Discard any Easter
        eggs that have been unrefrigerated for more than two hours," Moore
        says.  "Hard-boiled eggs, in the shell or peeled, can be stored for up
        to a week.  Keep them on a shelf inside the refrigerator, not in the
        door."
 
     ADA and ConAgra Foods are partners in Home Food Safety ... It's in Your
 Hands(TM), a nationwide program designed to educate consumers and provide them
 with solutions for easily and safely handling food in their own kitchens.  The
 program complements government-sponsored food safety initiatives that speak to
 leading food-handling problems.
     For more information, visit www.homefoodsafety.org or call ADA's Consumer
 Nutrition Information Line at 800-366-1655, where recorded messages, in both
 English and Spanish, are available 24 hours a day.
     The 70,000-member American Dietetic Association is the largest
 organization of food and nutrition professionals in the nation. With
 headquarters in Chicago, ADA serves the public by promoting optimal nutrition,
 health and well-being.
     ConAgra Foods Inc. (NYSE:   CAG) is one of the world's largest and most
 successful food companies. ConAgra Foods is North America's largest
 foodservice manufacturer and second-largest retail food supplier. This program
 is funded by the ConAgra Foundation, the philanthropic arm of ConAgra Foods,
 which works to improve the quality of life in communities across the U.S.
 
     CONTACT:  Lori Ferme of the American Dietetic Association, 800-877-1600,
 ext. 4802; Alison Baseley of Edelman Public Relations, 312-240-2848.
 
 SOURCE  American Dietetic Association and ConAgra Foods Inc.

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