Fund for Animals Urges Public Not to Purchase 'Throwaway' Rabbits, Ducks, or Chicks for Easter

Apr 11, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Fund for Animals

    WASHINGTON, April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- As Easter weekend approaches, The
 Fund for Animals is urging members of the public to refrain from purchasing
 those cute and cuddly "Easter" animals such as rabbits, ducks, and chicks from
 pet stores. These animals require more care and attention than most other
 companion animals, and they often become unwanted and are abandoned after the
 baby animals grow up and the Easter novelty wears off.
     "Rabbits and chicks are often treated as disposable when the holidays are
 over," said Michael Markarian, executive vice president of The Fund for
 Animals. "These are living animals, not throwaway toys."
     When purchasing live animals as holiday gifts for their children, most
 parents do not realize that these animals require a great deal of attention,
 food, water, exercise, and regular veterinary care. Children can accidentally
 injure or kill baby animals if they handle them incorrectly, and after a few
 days, children usually become bored with these animal "toys." Rabbits, ducks,
 and chicks are also among the animals who can transmit salmonella.
     The Fund for Animals is asking the public to consider purchasing
 alternative gifts, such as stuffed animals, instead of live rabbits, ducks, or
 chicks.
     "The decision to bring a companion animal into your life should be made
 with great care, not as a holiday gimmick," added Markarian. "If you are sure
 you want to care for a companion animal and give that animal a permanent home,
 please visit your local animal shelter and adopt a rabbit or other animal in
 need."
     The Fund for Animals, founded in 1967 by bestselling author Cleveland
 Amory, is one of the nation's largest and most active animal protection
 organizations. The Fund operates four world-famous animal care facilities,
 including a sanctuary for more than one hundred abandoned "pet" rabbits in
 Simpsonville, South Carolina. Learn more about The Fund for Animals by
 visiting the Web site at http://www.fund.org .
 
 

SOURCE The Fund for Animals
    WASHINGTON, April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- As Easter weekend approaches, The
 Fund for Animals is urging members of the public to refrain from purchasing
 those cute and cuddly "Easter" animals such as rabbits, ducks, and chicks from
 pet stores. These animals require more care and attention than most other
 companion animals, and they often become unwanted and are abandoned after the
 baby animals grow up and the Easter novelty wears off.
     "Rabbits and chicks are often treated as disposable when the holidays are
 over," said Michael Markarian, executive vice president of The Fund for
 Animals. "These are living animals, not throwaway toys."
     When purchasing live animals as holiday gifts for their children, most
 parents do not realize that these animals require a great deal of attention,
 food, water, exercise, and regular veterinary care. Children can accidentally
 injure or kill baby animals if they handle them incorrectly, and after a few
 days, children usually become bored with these animal "toys." Rabbits, ducks,
 and chicks are also among the animals who can transmit salmonella.
     The Fund for Animals is asking the public to consider purchasing
 alternative gifts, such as stuffed animals, instead of live rabbits, ducks, or
 chicks.
     "The decision to bring a companion animal into your life should be made
 with great care, not as a holiday gimmick," added Markarian. "If you are sure
 you want to care for a companion animal and give that animal a permanent home,
 please visit your local animal shelter and adopt a rabbit or other animal in
 need."
     The Fund for Animals, founded in 1967 by bestselling author Cleveland
 Amory, is one of the nation's largest and most active animal protection
 organizations. The Fund operates four world-famous animal care facilities,
 including a sanctuary for more than one hundred abandoned "pet" rabbits in
 Simpsonville, South Carolina. Learn more about The Fund for Animals by
 visiting the Web site at http://www.fund.org .
 
 SOURCE  The Fund for Animals