'Funnies' Pages No Place for Offensive Religious Cartoon

Apr 12, 2001, 01:00 ET from The American Jewish Committee

    NEW YORK, April 12 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Jewish Committee today
 called a popular comic strip's planned denigration of Judaism highly offensive
 and urged newspapers across the country to either replace it or print a
 disclaimer on Sunday.
     The "B.C." comic strip, slated to appear on April 15, depicts the seven
 candles of a menorah, a sacred symbol of Jews and Judaism, burning out, one by
 one, as the last seven words of Jesus are recited. In the last panel of the
 comic strip, the entire menorah, representing the Jewish religion, is replaced
 by a Christian cross.
     "Supercessionism, the belief that Christianity can and will replace
 Judaism, has been strongly repudiated by many leading Catholic and Protestant
 theologians," said the American Jewish Committee.
     "Whatever the cartoonist's personal beliefs, the sudden insertion of
 religiously offensive cartoons into the comics section of Sunday newspapers is
 highly inappropriate and abuses readers, especially young children, who turn
 to B.C. every week," said AJC.  "Appearing in newspapers on the last day of
 Passover and Easter Sunday makes this form of religious exploitation all the
 more shameful."
 
 

SOURCE The American Jewish Committee
    NEW YORK, April 12 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Jewish Committee today
 called a popular comic strip's planned denigration of Judaism highly offensive
 and urged newspapers across the country to either replace it or print a
 disclaimer on Sunday.
     The "B.C." comic strip, slated to appear on April 15, depicts the seven
 candles of a menorah, a sacred symbol of Jews and Judaism, burning out, one by
 one, as the last seven words of Jesus are recited. In the last panel of the
 comic strip, the entire menorah, representing the Jewish religion, is replaced
 by a Christian cross.
     "Supercessionism, the belief that Christianity can and will replace
 Judaism, has been strongly repudiated by many leading Catholic and Protestant
 theologians," said the American Jewish Committee.
     "Whatever the cartoonist's personal beliefs, the sudden insertion of
 religiously offensive cartoons into the comics section of Sunday newspapers is
 highly inappropriate and abuses readers, especially young children, who turn
 to B.C. every week," said AJC.  "Appearing in newspapers on the last day of
 Passover and Easter Sunday makes this form of religious exploitation all the
 more shameful."
 
 SOURCE  The American Jewish Committee