Genaera Presents Data for Squalamine in Eye Disease at ARVO

Apr 30, 2001, 01:00 ET from Genaera Corporation

    PLYMOUTH MEETING, Pa., April 30 /PRNewswire/ --
 Genaera Corporation (Nasdaq:   GENR) and collaborators presented preclinical
 data for squalamine, the Company's anti-angiogenic agent, in eye disease.  The
 research was conducted in collaboration with Tulane University Health Sciences
 Center of New Orleans, Louisiana, under the direction of Gholam Peyman, MD.
 The presentation was made at the Association for Research in Vision and
 Ophthalmology (ARVO), held in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
     The first study is entitled "Effects of Squalamine on Iris
 Neovascularization in Monkeys."  This study demonstrated that systemic
 squalamine administration led to inhibition of the development of iris
 neovascularization and partial regression of new vessels.  The dose for
 squalamine to produce these effects was 1 mg/kg, or about 12 mg/m2 for a
 monkey.
     The second study, "Pharmacokinetic Distribution of the Angiogenesis
 Inhibitor Squalamine in Rabbit Eye Tissue Following Intravenous
 Administration," assessed the distribution and residence time of squalamine in
 eye disease.  The results demonstrate that potentially therapeutic levels of
 squalamine are maintained for lengthy periods of time in mammalian eye tissues
 following systemic squalamine delivery.
     Dr. Peyman commented, "This research has demonstrated that squalamine
 significantly inhibits abnormal blood vessel development, as well as initiates
 partial regression of new vessels, in ocular neovascularization.  These
 results may be applicable to multiple forms of ocular neovascularization,
 including macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, certain forms of
 glaucoma and retinopathy of prematurity.  I am enthusiastic about clinically
 investigating the potential uses of squalamine for neovascular eye disease."
     Roy C. Levitt, MD, President and Chief Executive Officer at Genaera
 commented, "We remain pleased with the potential for squalamine to be
 developed as a treatment for "wet" macular degeneration and other angiogenic
 eye diseases.  Squalamine continues to demonstrate potent anti-angiogenic
 effects in models of ocular neovascularization.  For example, the dose used in
 Dr. Peyman's primate study is about 10% of the doses currently being used
 successfully in squalamine clinical trials for patients with advanced cancer.
 Moreover, our pharmacokinetic data suggests that simple intermittent
 squalamine dosing regimens may be possible for these patients.  Dr. Peyman's
 work complements the positive results we have demonstrated in studies with
 other ophthalmology investigators, including several animal models of
 retinopathy of prematurity, and the funding of the Juvenile Diabetes
 Foundation supporting investigations on the potential role of squalamine as a
 treatment for diabetic retinopathy.  We look forward to continued progress and
 future clinical development of squalamine to determine its potential as a
 therapeutic for angiogenic eye disease indications such as "wet" macular
 degeneration.  Macular degeneration remains a significant unmet medical need
 and a large market opportunity."
     Genaera Corporation, formerly Magainin Pharmaceuticals Inc., is a
 biopharmaceutical company committed to developing medicines for serious
 diseases from genomics and natural products.  Research and development efforts
 are focused on anti-angiogenesis, obesity, infectious diseases and respiratory
 diseases.
 
     This announcement contains forward-looking statements that are subject to
 risks and uncertainties.  Forward-looking statements reflect management's
 current views and are based on certain expectations and assumptions.  Such
 statements include, among others, statements regarding the preliminary results
 and future clinical development plans and prospects for squalamine in the
 treatment of eye disease, including neovascularization and in other
 indications.  You may identify some of these forward looking-statements by the
 use of words in the statements such as "potential," "positive," "continued,"
 "progress" or other words of similar meaning.  Genaera's actual results and
 performance could differ materially from those currently anticipated and
 expressed in these and other forward-looking statements as a result of a
 number of factors, including, but not limited to, the additional data to be
 collected from the clinical trials, results of additional clinical development
 plans, results of ongoing preclinical and clinical studies in our drug
 development candidates, general financial, economic, regulatory and political
 conditions affecting the biotechnology industry and the other risks and
 uncertainties discussed in this announcement and in Genaera's filings with the
 U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.  Genaera does not intend (and it is
 not obligated) to publicly update, revise or correct these forward-looking
 statements.  This discussion is permitted by the Private Securities Litigation
 Reform Act of 1995.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X55949116
 
 

SOURCE Genaera Corporation
    PLYMOUTH MEETING, Pa., April 30 /PRNewswire/ --
 Genaera Corporation (Nasdaq:   GENR) and collaborators presented preclinical
 data for squalamine, the Company's anti-angiogenic agent, in eye disease.  The
 research was conducted in collaboration with Tulane University Health Sciences
 Center of New Orleans, Louisiana, under the direction of Gholam Peyman, MD.
 The presentation was made at the Association for Research in Vision and
 Ophthalmology (ARVO), held in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
     The first study is entitled "Effects of Squalamine on Iris
 Neovascularization in Monkeys."  This study demonstrated that systemic
 squalamine administration led to inhibition of the development of iris
 neovascularization and partial regression of new vessels.  The dose for
 squalamine to produce these effects was 1 mg/kg, or about 12 mg/m2 for a
 monkey.
     The second study, "Pharmacokinetic Distribution of the Angiogenesis
 Inhibitor Squalamine in Rabbit Eye Tissue Following Intravenous
 Administration," assessed the distribution and residence time of squalamine in
 eye disease.  The results demonstrate that potentially therapeutic levels of
 squalamine are maintained for lengthy periods of time in mammalian eye tissues
 following systemic squalamine delivery.
     Dr. Peyman commented, "This research has demonstrated that squalamine
 significantly inhibits abnormal blood vessel development, as well as initiates
 partial regression of new vessels, in ocular neovascularization.  These
 results may be applicable to multiple forms of ocular neovascularization,
 including macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, certain forms of
 glaucoma and retinopathy of prematurity.  I am enthusiastic about clinically
 investigating the potential uses of squalamine for neovascular eye disease."
     Roy C. Levitt, MD, President and Chief Executive Officer at Genaera
 commented, "We remain pleased with the potential for squalamine to be
 developed as a treatment for "wet" macular degeneration and other angiogenic
 eye diseases.  Squalamine continues to demonstrate potent anti-angiogenic
 effects in models of ocular neovascularization.  For example, the dose used in
 Dr. Peyman's primate study is about 10% of the doses currently being used
 successfully in squalamine clinical trials for patients with advanced cancer.
 Moreover, our pharmacokinetic data suggests that simple intermittent
 squalamine dosing regimens may be possible for these patients.  Dr. Peyman's
 work complements the positive results we have demonstrated in studies with
 other ophthalmology investigators, including several animal models of
 retinopathy of prematurity, and the funding of the Juvenile Diabetes
 Foundation supporting investigations on the potential role of squalamine as a
 treatment for diabetic retinopathy.  We look forward to continued progress and
 future clinical development of squalamine to determine its potential as a
 therapeutic for angiogenic eye disease indications such as "wet" macular
 degeneration.  Macular degeneration remains a significant unmet medical need
 and a large market opportunity."
     Genaera Corporation, formerly Magainin Pharmaceuticals Inc., is a
 biopharmaceutical company committed to developing medicines for serious
 diseases from genomics and natural products.  Research and development efforts
 are focused on anti-angiogenesis, obesity, infectious diseases and respiratory
 diseases.
 
     This announcement contains forward-looking statements that are subject to
 risks and uncertainties.  Forward-looking statements reflect management's
 current views and are based on certain expectations and assumptions.  Such
 statements include, among others, statements regarding the preliminary results
 and future clinical development plans and prospects for squalamine in the
 treatment of eye disease, including neovascularization and in other
 indications.  You may identify some of these forward looking-statements by the
 use of words in the statements such as "potential," "positive," "continued,"
 "progress" or other words of similar meaning.  Genaera's actual results and
 performance could differ materially from those currently anticipated and
 expressed in these and other forward-looking statements as a result of a
 number of factors, including, but not limited to, the additional data to be
 collected from the clinical trials, results of additional clinical development
 plans, results of ongoing preclinical and clinical studies in our drug
 development candidates, general financial, economic, regulatory and political
 conditions affecting the biotechnology industry and the other risks and
 uncertainties discussed in this announcement and in Genaera's filings with the
 U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.  Genaera does not intend (and it is
 not obligated) to publicly update, revise or correct these forward-looking
 statements.  This discussion is permitted by the Private Securities Litigation
 Reform Act of 1995.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X55949116
 
 SOURCE  Genaera Corporation