'Georgia's Growing Thirst': Conservancy Symposium to Address Water Conservation and Efficiency

Apr 02, 2001, 01:00 ET from Georgia Conservancy

    ATLANTA, April 2 /PRNewswire/ -- As metro Atlanta and parts of north
 Georgia become the first region in the state to address water quality and
 supply through a water management district, the Georgia Conservancy will host
 a half-day symposium on water conservation and efficiency Friday, May 4.
     The first of the Conservancy's Blueprints for Successful Communities
 symposia for 2001, "Georgia's Growing Thirst" will bring together experts from
 other parts of the country to talk about what other cities, counties and
 states are doing to manage water resources and what strategies and
 technologies have been successful in allowing rapidly growing communities to
 live within available water resources.
     No other metropolitan area in the country depends upon a smaller watershed
 for its primary source of drinking water than metro Atlanta. "With the
 population in the Atlanta region expected to grow by a million people in the
 next 20 years, we must begin thinking more carefully about how we use water,
 not where we can get more," said Susan Kidd, The Georgia Conservancy's vice
 president for education and advocacy who oversees the Blueprints program.
     Kidd continued, "Most of us grew up thinking Georgia had plenty of water.
 Growth is now testing the limits of our water resources. We have to begin
 thinking about how we can reduce consumption and still accommodate future
 growth."
     The symposium's keynote speaker, Tom Ash, vice president of Cooperative
 Technologies and Services International in Tustin, California, will discuss
 technology, education and involvement needed to reduce water demand and
 consumption among all sectors of society.  A 13-year veteran of water
 conservation efforts, Ash will present case studies from cities, counties and
 states around the country to show what works -- and what doesn't -- that can
 help Georgia commit itself to more efficient water use statewide.
     One of the most forward-looking approaches to water conservation is the
 California Urban Water Conservation Council (CUWCC), a coalition of 400 groups
 representing government, civic, environmental, business and industrial
 interests.  CUWCC was created to increase efficient water use statewide
 through partnerships among urban water agencies, public interest organizations
 and private entities and to integrate urban water conservation best management
 practices into the planning and management of California's water resources.
 Conner Everts, chairman of CUWCC, will explain how this coalition formed and
 operates for water conservation.
     Following these two speakers, a panel of local leaders will discuss how
 these and other strategies might work in metro Atlanta and Georgia.  Panelists
 include Pat Stevens, Environmental Planning Division, Atlanta Regional
 Commission; David Word, Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Andy Hull,
 Water Initiative Task Force, Georgia Horticulture Trade Association, and Mary
 Davis, National Wildlife Federation.  Georgia Conservancy trustee Doug Hooker,
 vice president, S. L. King & Associates, will moderate.
     The symposium is scheduled for Friday, May 4, 7:30 a.m., in the ballroom
 of the Loudermilk Center for the Regional Community in downtown Atlanta. It is
 being held in conjunction with the Sustainable Atlanta Roundtable and
 Southface Energy Institute.  The cost for the symposium, which includes a
 continental breakfast, is $30 ($40 at the door.)  Additional information and
 registration is available online at www.georgiaconservancy.org .
     The Georgia Conservancy launched Blueprints for Successful Communities in
 1995 to foster dialogue among concerned citizens, elected officials,
 developers, planners, architects and others about the relationship between
 land use and the environment.  In addition to hosting symposia about smart
 growth, the Conservancy, through Blueprints, offers technical assistance to
 local communities to build consensus about community goals and broad
 strategies for achieving them.
     The Blueprints Partners include the American Institute of Architects,
 American Society of Landscape Architects, Atlanta Neighborhood Development
 Partnership, Consulting Engineers Council, Georgia Planning Association,
 Georgia Tech, Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation, Greater Atlanta
 Association of Home Builders, Institute of Transportation Engineers
 Interprofessional Community Design Collaborative, National Association of
 Industrial and Office Properties, and Urban Land Institute.
     The next Blueprints symposium is scheduled for Friday, September 7.
     "Georgia's Growing Thirst" is sponsored in part by Georgia Power, the
 J. W. and Ethel I. Woodruff Foundation, AT&T, and the Richards Foundation.
 
 

SOURCE Georgia Conservancy
    ATLANTA, April 2 /PRNewswire/ -- As metro Atlanta and parts of north
 Georgia become the first region in the state to address water quality and
 supply through a water management district, the Georgia Conservancy will host
 a half-day symposium on water conservation and efficiency Friday, May 4.
     The first of the Conservancy's Blueprints for Successful Communities
 symposia for 2001, "Georgia's Growing Thirst" will bring together experts from
 other parts of the country to talk about what other cities, counties and
 states are doing to manage water resources and what strategies and
 technologies have been successful in allowing rapidly growing communities to
 live within available water resources.
     No other metropolitan area in the country depends upon a smaller watershed
 for its primary source of drinking water than metro Atlanta. "With the
 population in the Atlanta region expected to grow by a million people in the
 next 20 years, we must begin thinking more carefully about how we use water,
 not where we can get more," said Susan Kidd, The Georgia Conservancy's vice
 president for education and advocacy who oversees the Blueprints program.
     Kidd continued, "Most of us grew up thinking Georgia had plenty of water.
 Growth is now testing the limits of our water resources. We have to begin
 thinking about how we can reduce consumption and still accommodate future
 growth."
     The symposium's keynote speaker, Tom Ash, vice president of Cooperative
 Technologies and Services International in Tustin, California, will discuss
 technology, education and involvement needed to reduce water demand and
 consumption among all sectors of society.  A 13-year veteran of water
 conservation efforts, Ash will present case studies from cities, counties and
 states around the country to show what works -- and what doesn't -- that can
 help Georgia commit itself to more efficient water use statewide.
     One of the most forward-looking approaches to water conservation is the
 California Urban Water Conservation Council (CUWCC), a coalition of 400 groups
 representing government, civic, environmental, business and industrial
 interests.  CUWCC was created to increase efficient water use statewide
 through partnerships among urban water agencies, public interest organizations
 and private entities and to integrate urban water conservation best management
 practices into the planning and management of California's water resources.
 Conner Everts, chairman of CUWCC, will explain how this coalition formed and
 operates for water conservation.
     Following these two speakers, a panel of local leaders will discuss how
 these and other strategies might work in metro Atlanta and Georgia.  Panelists
 include Pat Stevens, Environmental Planning Division, Atlanta Regional
 Commission; David Word, Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Andy Hull,
 Water Initiative Task Force, Georgia Horticulture Trade Association, and Mary
 Davis, National Wildlife Federation.  Georgia Conservancy trustee Doug Hooker,
 vice president, S. L. King & Associates, will moderate.
     The symposium is scheduled for Friday, May 4, 7:30 a.m., in the ballroom
 of the Loudermilk Center for the Regional Community in downtown Atlanta. It is
 being held in conjunction with the Sustainable Atlanta Roundtable and
 Southface Energy Institute.  The cost for the symposium, which includes a
 continental breakfast, is $30 ($40 at the door.)  Additional information and
 registration is available online at www.georgiaconservancy.org .
     The Georgia Conservancy launched Blueprints for Successful Communities in
 1995 to foster dialogue among concerned citizens, elected officials,
 developers, planners, architects and others about the relationship between
 land use and the environment.  In addition to hosting symposia about smart
 growth, the Conservancy, through Blueprints, offers technical assistance to
 local communities to build consensus about community goals and broad
 strategies for achieving them.
     The Blueprints Partners include the American Institute of Architects,
 American Society of Landscape Architects, Atlanta Neighborhood Development
 Partnership, Consulting Engineers Council, Georgia Planning Association,
 Georgia Tech, Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation, Greater Atlanta
 Association of Home Builders, Institute of Transportation Engineers
 Interprofessional Community Design Collaborative, National Association of
 Industrial and Office Properties, and Urban Land Institute.
     The next Blueprints symposium is scheduled for Friday, September 7.
     "Georgia's Growing Thirst" is sponsored in part by Georgia Power, the
 J. W. and Ethel I. Woodruff Foundation, AT&T, and the Richards Foundation.
 
 SOURCE  Georgia Conservancy