Gov. Barnes to Speak at Dedication and Unveiling Of 'Friendship Monument' in Cartersville April 28

Apr 19, 2001, 01:00 ET from Graphic Publishing Company

    CARTERSVILLE, Ga., April 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Gov. Roy E. Barnes will speak
 in Cartersville, Georgia on April 28 at the unveiling and dedication of the
 unique Friendship Monument erected by prominent Georgia industrialist Mark
 Anthony Cooper before the Civil War.
     The monument has been restored and relocated to Cartersville's Friendship
 Plaza, renamed for the monument.  It was erected by Cooper as a tribute to the
 38 friends who came to his aid and saved his Etowah Iron Works from financial
 ruin in the mid-1850s.
     The Friendship Day program is hosted by the City of Cartersville, Bartow
 County, the Etowah Valley Historical Society, the Etowah Foundation's History
 Center, and Mark Cooper Pope III, great-great-grandson of Mark A. Cooper.  Mr.
 Pope and J. Donald McKee authored "Mark Anthony Cooper: The Iron Man of
 Georgia," a biography of Cooper, and their work led to the restoration and
 moving of the Friendship Monument to the permanent site in Friendship Plaza.
     During the April 28 program, which will start at 2:00 p.m., special
 recognition will be given to a large number of the living descendants of the
 38 persons named on the monument.
     Mark A. Cooper (1800-1885) established one of the South's major ironworks
 at the town of Etowah, on the Etowah River near Cartersville.  He also built a
 large flour mill and other facilities, employing 500 workers and creating a
 town of 1,200 people.  His capital-intensive business encountered severe
 financial problems in the mid-1850's and he turned to some of Georgia's
 leading men to obtain the assistance needed to keep the ironworks, flour mill
 and other operations going.
     With the help of 38 friends, he was able to buy his property back out of
 bankruptcy in three years and, ultimately he repaid all of his creditors.
     Cooper had a monument made of Georgia marble with the names of his
 benefactors and his tribute to them.  The 14-foot marble shaft was erected
 near Cooper's ironworks on the Etowah River.
     After vandals defaced the monument, it was moved to the downtown
 Cartersville park in 1927, then later moved back to the overlook to the
 Allatoona dam and near site of the original Etowah Iron Works.  It was
 returned this year to the new Friendship Plaza in Cartersville.
 
 

SOURCE Graphic Publishing Company
    CARTERSVILLE, Ga., April 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Gov. Roy E. Barnes will speak
 in Cartersville, Georgia on April 28 at the unveiling and dedication of the
 unique Friendship Monument erected by prominent Georgia industrialist Mark
 Anthony Cooper before the Civil War.
     The monument has been restored and relocated to Cartersville's Friendship
 Plaza, renamed for the monument.  It was erected by Cooper as a tribute to the
 38 friends who came to his aid and saved his Etowah Iron Works from financial
 ruin in the mid-1850s.
     The Friendship Day program is hosted by the City of Cartersville, Bartow
 County, the Etowah Valley Historical Society, the Etowah Foundation's History
 Center, and Mark Cooper Pope III, great-great-grandson of Mark A. Cooper.  Mr.
 Pope and J. Donald McKee authored "Mark Anthony Cooper: The Iron Man of
 Georgia," a biography of Cooper, and their work led to the restoration and
 moving of the Friendship Monument to the permanent site in Friendship Plaza.
     During the April 28 program, which will start at 2:00 p.m., special
 recognition will be given to a large number of the living descendants of the
 38 persons named on the monument.
     Mark A. Cooper (1800-1885) established one of the South's major ironworks
 at the town of Etowah, on the Etowah River near Cartersville.  He also built a
 large flour mill and other facilities, employing 500 workers and creating a
 town of 1,200 people.  His capital-intensive business encountered severe
 financial problems in the mid-1850's and he turned to some of Georgia's
 leading men to obtain the assistance needed to keep the ironworks, flour mill
 and other operations going.
     With the help of 38 friends, he was able to buy his property back out of
 bankruptcy in three years and, ultimately he repaid all of his creditors.
     Cooper had a monument made of Georgia marble with the names of his
 benefactors and his tribute to them.  The 14-foot marble shaft was erected
 near Cooper's ironworks on the Etowah River.
     After vandals defaced the monument, it was moved to the downtown
 Cartersville park in 1927, then later moved back to the overlook to the
 Allatoona dam and near site of the original Etowah Iron Works.  It was
 returned this year to the new Friendship Plaza in Cartersville.
 
 SOURCE  Graphic Publishing Company