Harvard Students Lead Campus Activism on AIDS Issues; Week of Events Part of New Trend Toward Concern With AIDS Orphans

Apr 18, 2001, 01:00 ET from Association Francois-Xavier Bagnoud

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., April 18 /PRNewswire/ -- Harvard students outraged over
 the plight of millions of orphans abandoned as AIDS ravages developing
 countries, are fundraising, signing petitions, fasting this week to demand
 international action on behalf of the forgotten victims of the AIDS pandemic.
 Student organizers at Harvard are part of a nationwide trend toward concern
 about the deadly impact of AIDS in Africa, India and throughout the developing
 world.
     Harvard students, lead by freshman student Laura Bonner, are gathering
 signatures as part of an effort to demand that all governments of the world
 "act without waiting for the worst to happen ...  by applying and respecting
 the Convention on the Rights of the Child."  The signatures gathered on the
 petitions will be officially presented to the United Nations General Assembly
 in September 2001.
     The Harvard AIDS Benefit Week will culminate on Friday, April 20 with the
 presentation of the Harvard Project for International Health and Development
 Award to honor humanitarian leader Albina du Boisrouvray, who gave away a
 large portion of her personal fortune to launch the Francois-Xavier Bagnoud
 (FXB) foundation and association, a non-governmental organization active in
 16 countries working on behalf of children orphaned by AIDS.  Accepting the
 award for her will be a Board Member of the FXB US Foundation.  Du Boisrouvray
 also funded Harvard's FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, a pioneering
 research center and think-tank to document how human rights abuses fuel
 epidemics like AIDS.
     "Thank you also for taking on the AIDS Orphans cause and for being a
 strong voice for them, for their rights, for putting them on the top of the
 agendas of the powerful, the decisions makers and the money givers," wrote Du
 Boisrouvray in a letter acknowledging the award.  "This tragedy will be with
 us at least for a generation.  You, the Harvard students are that generation,
 it is your cause and your responsibility."
     Students nationwide are protesting the hefty royalties their universities
 are making from their patents of AIDS drugs are sold to AIDS ravaged countries
 like South Africa.  The weeklong Harvard Awareness Campaign, however, is aimed
 at the crisis of the orphans.  "It's the biggest political crisis of our
 generation," says graduate student Adam Taylor, a 25-year old AIDS activist at
 Harvard.
     Du Boisrouvray's FXB foundation estimates that currently there are more
 than 13 million orphaned children growing to more than 100 million AIDS
 orphans by the end of the decade.  To learn more about the work of the FXB
 foundation and association, see http://www.fxb.org.
     The Harvard Project for International Health and Development Award will be
 held Friday at sundown at the Adams House Dining Hall on the Harvard campus.
 For details of the events of the Harvard AIDS Awareness Week, see
 http://www.bhumi.net/aids.
 
 

SOURCE Association Francois-Xavier Bagnoud
    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., April 18 /PRNewswire/ -- Harvard students outraged over
 the plight of millions of orphans abandoned as AIDS ravages developing
 countries, are fundraising, signing petitions, fasting this week to demand
 international action on behalf of the forgotten victims of the AIDS pandemic.
 Student organizers at Harvard are part of a nationwide trend toward concern
 about the deadly impact of AIDS in Africa, India and throughout the developing
 world.
     Harvard students, lead by freshman student Laura Bonner, are gathering
 signatures as part of an effort to demand that all governments of the world
 "act without waiting for the worst to happen ...  by applying and respecting
 the Convention on the Rights of the Child."  The signatures gathered on the
 petitions will be officially presented to the United Nations General Assembly
 in September 2001.
     The Harvard AIDS Benefit Week will culminate on Friday, April 20 with the
 presentation of the Harvard Project for International Health and Development
 Award to honor humanitarian leader Albina du Boisrouvray, who gave away a
 large portion of her personal fortune to launch the Francois-Xavier Bagnoud
 (FXB) foundation and association, a non-governmental organization active in
 16 countries working on behalf of children orphaned by AIDS.  Accepting the
 award for her will be a Board Member of the FXB US Foundation.  Du Boisrouvray
 also funded Harvard's FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, a pioneering
 research center and think-tank to document how human rights abuses fuel
 epidemics like AIDS.
     "Thank you also for taking on the AIDS Orphans cause and for being a
 strong voice for them, for their rights, for putting them on the top of the
 agendas of the powerful, the decisions makers and the money givers," wrote Du
 Boisrouvray in a letter acknowledging the award.  "This tragedy will be with
 us at least for a generation.  You, the Harvard students are that generation,
 it is your cause and your responsibility."
     Students nationwide are protesting the hefty royalties their universities
 are making from their patents of AIDS drugs are sold to AIDS ravaged countries
 like South Africa.  The weeklong Harvard Awareness Campaign, however, is aimed
 at the crisis of the orphans.  "It's the biggest political crisis of our
 generation," says graduate student Adam Taylor, a 25-year old AIDS activist at
 Harvard.
     Du Boisrouvray's FXB foundation estimates that currently there are more
 than 13 million orphaned children growing to more than 100 million AIDS
 orphans by the end of the decade.  To learn more about the work of the FXB
 foundation and association, see http://www.fxb.org.
     The Harvard Project for International Health and Development Award will be
 held Friday at sundown at the Adams House Dining Hall on the Harvard campus.
 For details of the events of the Harvard AIDS Awareness Week, see
 http://www.bhumi.net/aids.
 
 SOURCE  Association Francois-Xavier Bagnoud