High School Students Address Sources of Violence at Illinois Youth Summit On May 1

Apr 30, 2001, 01:00 ET from Constitutional Rights Foundation Chicago

    CHICAGO, April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Illinois-Racial profiling, guns, and
 public morality are among the issues to be tackled by 200 high school student
 delegates to the 2001 Illinois Youth Summit in Chicago on May 1, from 8:30 AM
 to 2:30 PM at the Dirksen Federal Building, 219 S. Dearborn Street, 25th
 Floor.
     Now in its seventh year, the Summit focuses on issues of violence
 affecting youth that students select themselves for study and action.  At the
 Summit the student delegates will share their viewpoints and experiences with
 state and federal policymakers.
     "I am grateful for the opportunity to participate in this important
 forum," said U.S. Senator Dick Durbin, who sits on the Senate Judiciary
 Committee and will participate from Washington via video-teleconference on gun
 safety.  "All of us should listen to the advice of students who have a very
 real stake in the debate over school violence."
     Other federal policymakers scheduled to participate in person or from
 Washington include U.S. Senator Peter Fitzgerald, OJJDP Administrator John
 Wilson from the U.S. Department of Justice, and Deputy Director Jim Davids of
 the newly created Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives.
     Among the Illinois policies students will address is whether to repeal a
 provision of the Illinois Juvenile Court Act which mandates that youth who are
 15 or 16 years old and are arrested for violations of the Illinois Controlled
 Substances Act within 1,000 feet of public housing property be automatically
 tried in the adult court.  A report just released by the consortium Building
 Blocks for Youth notes that 99 percent of these automatic transfers in Cook
 County in 1999 and 2000 were either African American or Hispanic.  Scheduled
 participants by video-teleconference from Springfield include State
 Representatives Barbara Flynn-Currie and Thomas Dart, and State Senator Barack
 Obama.
     In addition to study, students conducted a survey and community service
 projects addressing these issues.  Over 2,000 responses to the survey have
 been tallied, and the results are available on-line at
 http://www.crfc.org/survey/survey.html . Descriptions of student service
 projects also are also posted on the summit web site at
 http://www.crfc.org/summit2001.html .
     "It's very refreshing to meet people from local schools to schools very
 far away that are committed to working on an idea," said Kenwood Academy
 junior Ashley Cooper.  All of these issues are part of a teenager's everyday
 life, she added, "whether or not they are conscious of it."
     The Illinois Youth Summit is conducted by the Constitutional Rights
 Foundation Chicago (CRFC), a non-profit, non-partisan organization that has
 helped schools foster critical thinking skills and responsible actions in
 students for over 25 years.  In addition to the Youth Summit, CRFC conducts
 law-related educational programs for elementary and secondary students in
 Illinois and across the nation.
     Funding for the 2001 Illinois Youth Summit is provided in part by the
 Illinois Violence Prevention Authority; the Illinois Violent Crime Victims
 Assistance Program administered by Illinois Attorney General Jim Ryan; and
 Youth for Justice, a cooperative program supported by the Office of Juvenile
 Justice and Delinquency Prevention of the U.S. Department of Justice.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X65383332
 
 

SOURCE Constitutional Rights Foundation Chicago
    CHICAGO, April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Illinois-Racial profiling, guns, and
 public morality are among the issues to be tackled by 200 high school student
 delegates to the 2001 Illinois Youth Summit in Chicago on May 1, from 8:30 AM
 to 2:30 PM at the Dirksen Federal Building, 219 S. Dearborn Street, 25th
 Floor.
     Now in its seventh year, the Summit focuses on issues of violence
 affecting youth that students select themselves for study and action.  At the
 Summit the student delegates will share their viewpoints and experiences with
 state and federal policymakers.
     "I am grateful for the opportunity to participate in this important
 forum," said U.S. Senator Dick Durbin, who sits on the Senate Judiciary
 Committee and will participate from Washington via video-teleconference on gun
 safety.  "All of us should listen to the advice of students who have a very
 real stake in the debate over school violence."
     Other federal policymakers scheduled to participate in person or from
 Washington include U.S. Senator Peter Fitzgerald, OJJDP Administrator John
 Wilson from the U.S. Department of Justice, and Deputy Director Jim Davids of
 the newly created Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives.
     Among the Illinois policies students will address is whether to repeal a
 provision of the Illinois Juvenile Court Act which mandates that youth who are
 15 or 16 years old and are arrested for violations of the Illinois Controlled
 Substances Act within 1,000 feet of public housing property be automatically
 tried in the adult court.  A report just released by the consortium Building
 Blocks for Youth notes that 99 percent of these automatic transfers in Cook
 County in 1999 and 2000 were either African American or Hispanic.  Scheduled
 participants by video-teleconference from Springfield include State
 Representatives Barbara Flynn-Currie and Thomas Dart, and State Senator Barack
 Obama.
     In addition to study, students conducted a survey and community service
 projects addressing these issues.  Over 2,000 responses to the survey have
 been tallied, and the results are available on-line at
 http://www.crfc.org/survey/survey.html . Descriptions of student service
 projects also are also posted on the summit web site at
 http://www.crfc.org/summit2001.html .
     "It's very refreshing to meet people from local schools to schools very
 far away that are committed to working on an idea," said Kenwood Academy
 junior Ashley Cooper.  All of these issues are part of a teenager's everyday
 life, she added, "whether or not they are conscious of it."
     The Illinois Youth Summit is conducted by the Constitutional Rights
 Foundation Chicago (CRFC), a non-profit, non-partisan organization that has
 helped schools foster critical thinking skills and responsible actions in
 students for over 25 years.  In addition to the Youth Summit, CRFC conducts
 law-related educational programs for elementary and secondary students in
 Illinois and across the nation.
     Funding for the 2001 Illinois Youth Summit is provided in part by the
 Illinois Violence Prevention Authority; the Illinois Violent Crime Victims
 Assistance Program administered by Illinois Attorney General Jim Ryan; and
 Youth for Justice, a cooperative program supported by the Office of Juvenile
 Justice and Delinquency Prevention of the U.S. Department of Justice.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X65383332
 
 SOURCE  Constitutional Rights Foundation Chicago