Home Appliances Help in Energy Crunch

Apr 23, 2001, 01:00 ET from Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers

    WASHINGTON, April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- Whether you
 live in California or Connecticut, you may be worrying about your electricity
 bill this summer and whether you will be faced with rolling brownouts or
 blackouts due to energy supply problems.  Home appliances account for only 3%
 of U.S. energy use.  Still, consumers should take comfort that these products
 are strong allies in controlling energy costs and offering comfort and
 convenience as they prepare for the coming energy crunch.
     Since the last energy crisis in 1979, the energy efficiency of home
 appliances has increased dramatically.  A typical household
 refrigerator/freezer is over 90% more energy efficient than the same sized
 unit in 1980.  A refrigerator today, running year round consumes less
 electricity than a 75-watt light bulb.  Annual utility costs for a
 refrigerator decreased from $106 to $55 during the same period.  According to
 the U.S. Department of Energy, appliances account for about 20% of your
 household's energy consumption, with refrigerators and clothes dryers at the
 top of the consumption list.
     And the same is true for other appliances as well:  Operating costs for
 freezers have gone from $73 to $38, from $76 to $52 for dishwashers and from
 $89 to $78 for clothes washers.  For those consumers who are still employing
 appliances from 1980, a significant improvement in efficiency and decrease in
 utility bills is guaranteed with an "early retirement" of the older unit.
 According to the Pew Center on Global Climate Change, retiring a fifteen-year-
 old refrigerator with a new unit with average efficiency yields energy savings
 of forty-eight percent!  A thirty percent savings is gained from an early
 retirement of a dishwasher.  Consumers can reap even greater savings by
 targeting a high efficiency model.
     Government policymakers, utilities and environmental groups have been
 trying for years to devise policy efforts to entice consumers to purchase new
 appliances based on energy efficiency.  Their efforts are beginning to pay
 off.  A number of attractive programs exist throughout the country, from a
 sales tax exemption for high efficiency appliances in Maryland, to the recent
 program announced by California to provide rebates to purchasers of high
 efficiency appliances.
     According to Joseph M. McGuire, President of the Association of Home
 Appliance Manufacturers, "The message for consumers today is if you are
 considering buying a new appliance, the energy savings resulting from almost
 any unit bought today means money in the bank.  The payback for a higher
 efficiency unit can be sizable.  For people who see a purchase on the horizon,
 perhaps in the next 1-3 years, consideration of accelerating that purchase can
 have an immediate operating benefit."
     Most people don't realize the tremendous consumer value embodied in home
 appliances over time.  Performance and efficiency have all improved greatly in
 the last generation, yet consumer costs for appliances have trailed the
 Consumer Price Index (CPI) by fifty percent over the last fifteen years.  This
 is due to the fact that the manufacturing of home appliances remains a highly
 competitive, innovative industry, according to McGuire.
     The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) is a not-for-profit
 trade association representing manufacturers of major and portable home
 appliances, and suppliers to the industry and is headquartered in Washington,
 D.C.  You can visit the AHAM web site at http://www.aham.org .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X72409533
 
 

SOURCE Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers
    WASHINGTON, April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- Whether you
 live in California or Connecticut, you may be worrying about your electricity
 bill this summer and whether you will be faced with rolling brownouts or
 blackouts due to energy supply problems.  Home appliances account for only 3%
 of U.S. energy use.  Still, consumers should take comfort that these products
 are strong allies in controlling energy costs and offering comfort and
 convenience as they prepare for the coming energy crunch.
     Since the last energy crisis in 1979, the energy efficiency of home
 appliances has increased dramatically.  A typical household
 refrigerator/freezer is over 90% more energy efficient than the same sized
 unit in 1980.  A refrigerator today, running year round consumes less
 electricity than a 75-watt light bulb.  Annual utility costs for a
 refrigerator decreased from $106 to $55 during the same period.  According to
 the U.S. Department of Energy, appliances account for about 20% of your
 household's energy consumption, with refrigerators and clothes dryers at the
 top of the consumption list.
     And the same is true for other appliances as well:  Operating costs for
 freezers have gone from $73 to $38, from $76 to $52 for dishwashers and from
 $89 to $78 for clothes washers.  For those consumers who are still employing
 appliances from 1980, a significant improvement in efficiency and decrease in
 utility bills is guaranteed with an "early retirement" of the older unit.
 According to the Pew Center on Global Climate Change, retiring a fifteen-year-
 old refrigerator with a new unit with average efficiency yields energy savings
 of forty-eight percent!  A thirty percent savings is gained from an early
 retirement of a dishwasher.  Consumers can reap even greater savings by
 targeting a high efficiency model.
     Government policymakers, utilities and environmental groups have been
 trying for years to devise policy efforts to entice consumers to purchase new
 appliances based on energy efficiency.  Their efforts are beginning to pay
 off.  A number of attractive programs exist throughout the country, from a
 sales tax exemption for high efficiency appliances in Maryland, to the recent
 program announced by California to provide rebates to purchasers of high
 efficiency appliances.
     According to Joseph M. McGuire, President of the Association of Home
 Appliance Manufacturers, "The message for consumers today is if you are
 considering buying a new appliance, the energy savings resulting from almost
 any unit bought today means money in the bank.  The payback for a higher
 efficiency unit can be sizable.  For people who see a purchase on the horizon,
 perhaps in the next 1-3 years, consideration of accelerating that purchase can
 have an immediate operating benefit."
     Most people don't realize the tremendous consumer value embodied in home
 appliances over time.  Performance and efficiency have all improved greatly in
 the last generation, yet consumer costs for appliances have trailed the
 Consumer Price Index (CPI) by fifty percent over the last fifteen years.  This
 is due to the fact that the manufacturing of home appliances remains a highly
 competitive, innovative industry, according to McGuire.
     The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) is a not-for-profit
 trade association representing manufacturers of major and portable home
 appliances, and suppliers to the industry and is headquartered in Washington,
 D.C.  You can visit the AHAM web site at http://www.aham.org .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X72409533
 
 SOURCE  Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers