How Do We Know Who's Watching Our Children?

Census SIPP Survey Gives Valuable Information for Our Community and Nation



Apr 26, 2001, 01:00 ET from U.S. Census Bureau

    DETROIT, April 26 /PRNewswire/ -- In 1995, the US Census Bureau conducted
 a nationwide survey that found about 7 million children five to 14 years old
 were regularly left unsupervised while their parents were at work or away from
 the home for other reasons.  This study, the Survey of Income and Program
 Participation, or SIPP, reveals an important part of our nation's social
 fabric.  It also gives information that is critical for any community that
 wants to understand its need for childcare or after school programs.  This is
 but one way that the Census Bureau's continuing surveys serve the needs of the
 country.
     Since February, Census Bureau field representatives have been in the field
 seeking information about a variety of topics.  About 37,000 households will
 be involved in the surveys nationwide.  Childcare will be one of the topics
 addressed later on to determine if things have changed since 1995.  The
 questions asked are part of, which measures changes over time.  Selected
 households may remain in the survey until 2003.
     "It is important that selected households participate in the SIPP because
 the results provide policy-makers with timely information on emerging
 demographic and socioeconomic trends," said Dwight P. Dean, Director of the
 Census Bureau's Detroit Regional Office.
     The Survey also tracks changes in people's jobs, the type of work they do,
 the number of people actively looking for work, income levels and education.
 Retirement and pension plans may also be covered.
     As with all data collected by the Census Bureau, all personal information
 or any information that could be used to identify an individual or household
 is kept strictly confidential.  "Census 2000 proved to everyone that the
 Census Bureau holds confidentiality absolutely sacrosanct," said Regional
 Director Dean.  "As with the Decennial, we are gathering information that will
 help fulfill the nation's needs," Dean added.
 
     Anyone seeking information about SIPP or any US Census survey activity can
 call toll-free:  1-800-432-1494 or visit
 http://www.census.gov/rodet/www/surveys.htm
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X63007435
 
 

SOURCE U.S. Census Bureau
    DETROIT, April 26 /PRNewswire/ -- In 1995, the US Census Bureau conducted
 a nationwide survey that found about 7 million children five to 14 years old
 were regularly left unsupervised while their parents were at work or away from
 the home for other reasons.  This study, the Survey of Income and Program
 Participation, or SIPP, reveals an important part of our nation's social
 fabric.  It also gives information that is critical for any community that
 wants to understand its need for childcare or after school programs.  This is
 but one way that the Census Bureau's continuing surveys serve the needs of the
 country.
     Since February, Census Bureau field representatives have been in the field
 seeking information about a variety of topics.  About 37,000 households will
 be involved in the surveys nationwide.  Childcare will be one of the topics
 addressed later on to determine if things have changed since 1995.  The
 questions asked are part of, which measures changes over time.  Selected
 households may remain in the survey until 2003.
     "It is important that selected households participate in the SIPP because
 the results provide policy-makers with timely information on emerging
 demographic and socioeconomic trends," said Dwight P. Dean, Director of the
 Census Bureau's Detroit Regional Office.
     The Survey also tracks changes in people's jobs, the type of work they do,
 the number of people actively looking for work, income levels and education.
 Retirement and pension plans may also be covered.
     As with all data collected by the Census Bureau, all personal information
 or any information that could be used to identify an individual or household
 is kept strictly confidential.  "Census 2000 proved to everyone that the
 Census Bureau holds confidentiality absolutely sacrosanct," said Regional
 Director Dean.  "As with the Decennial, we are gathering information that will
 help fulfill the nation's needs," Dean added.
 
     Anyone seeking information about SIPP or any US Census survey activity can
 call toll-free:  1-800-432-1494 or visit
 http://www.census.gov/rodet/www/surveys.htm
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X63007435
 
 SOURCE  U.S. Census Bureau