IBHS and MOSI Launch National Center for Natural Disaster Safety

Apr 10, 2001, 01:00 ET from Institute for Business & Home Safety

    TAMPA, Fla., April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The Institute for Business & Home
 Safety (IBHS) and MOSI, Tampa's Museum of Science & Industry, today launched a
 partnership to create the country's first center for understanding and
 surviving natural disasters.
     The National Center for Natural Disaster Safety will help visitors to
 better understand earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, hail and
 wildfires and learn how to protect their homes and families from them. This
 will be done through new interactive exhibits, training for architects,
 engineers and other building professionals, as well as an extensive natural
 disaster research library.
     Harvey Ryland, IBHS President & CEO, said, "Our two organizations exist to
 help people understand natural events.  MOSI explains the causes, and IBHS
 looks at the consequences and how to prepare for them.  Together we can
 educate, save lives and property, and learn more."
     Wit Ostrenko, President of MOSI, said, "The science center is all about
 making science and technology real for people of all ages.  This is a perfect
 partnership that has a great take-home application."
     Dr. William Gray, the country's leading hurricane forecaster and professor
 of atmospheric science at Colorado State University, was the featured speaker
 at today's ceremony.  According to Gray, "It is inevitable that in the next
 15-20 years we will see U.S. hurricane-spawned destruction many times greater
 than anything we have seen in the last 30 years.  More planning is needed by
 all segments of society to better develop methods of dealing with this
 increasing threat."
     In addition to launching the joint project today, IBHS broke ground on its
 new headquarters office, on the MOSI campus.  The organization moved from
 Boston to Tampa last October, and is currently in temporary office space on
 Westshore Boulevard.
     The new facility will be a two-story structure of about 17,000 square
 feet, scheduled for completion in August 2002.  The first floor is planned to
 be MOSI's new visitor's center and main entrance.  The second floor will be
 office space for the IBHS staff.
     RBK Architects of Tampa designed the building, which in keeping with the
 IBHS mission, will be disaster-resistant.  These features include impact
 resistant windows, impact and pressure-resistant entry doors, and it will be
 located out of the flood plain.  Engineers used design pressures based on a
 wind speed of 140 m.p.h. (compared to this area's normal design wind speed of
 110 m.p.h.)  The building will be constructed at an estimated cost of $2.8
 million, financed by tax-free bonds.
 
     IBHS is a national non-profit initiative of the insurance industry to
 reduce deaths, injuries, property damage, economic losses and human suffering
 caused by natural disasters.
 
     MOSI is the largest science center in the Southeastern United States and
 home of the only IMAX Dome Theatre in Florida.  The National Center for
 Natural Disaster Safety is part of a five-year, $37 million expansion that
 will make it the largest children's science center in the country, and will
 include a charter school, and the renovation of existing "minds-on"
 interactive exhibits.
 
 

SOURCE Institute for Business & Home Safety
    TAMPA, Fla., April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The Institute for Business & Home
 Safety (IBHS) and MOSI, Tampa's Museum of Science & Industry, today launched a
 partnership to create the country's first center for understanding and
 surviving natural disasters.
     The National Center for Natural Disaster Safety will help visitors to
 better understand earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, hail and
 wildfires and learn how to protect their homes and families from them. This
 will be done through new interactive exhibits, training for architects,
 engineers and other building professionals, as well as an extensive natural
 disaster research library.
     Harvey Ryland, IBHS President & CEO, said, "Our two organizations exist to
 help people understand natural events.  MOSI explains the causes, and IBHS
 looks at the consequences and how to prepare for them.  Together we can
 educate, save lives and property, and learn more."
     Wit Ostrenko, President of MOSI, said, "The science center is all about
 making science and technology real for people of all ages.  This is a perfect
 partnership that has a great take-home application."
     Dr. William Gray, the country's leading hurricane forecaster and professor
 of atmospheric science at Colorado State University, was the featured speaker
 at today's ceremony.  According to Gray, "It is inevitable that in the next
 15-20 years we will see U.S. hurricane-spawned destruction many times greater
 than anything we have seen in the last 30 years.  More planning is needed by
 all segments of society to better develop methods of dealing with this
 increasing threat."
     In addition to launching the joint project today, IBHS broke ground on its
 new headquarters office, on the MOSI campus.  The organization moved from
 Boston to Tampa last October, and is currently in temporary office space on
 Westshore Boulevard.
     The new facility will be a two-story structure of about 17,000 square
 feet, scheduled for completion in August 2002.  The first floor is planned to
 be MOSI's new visitor's center and main entrance.  The second floor will be
 office space for the IBHS staff.
     RBK Architects of Tampa designed the building, which in keeping with the
 IBHS mission, will be disaster-resistant.  These features include impact
 resistant windows, impact and pressure-resistant entry doors, and it will be
 located out of the flood plain.  Engineers used design pressures based on a
 wind speed of 140 m.p.h. (compared to this area's normal design wind speed of
 110 m.p.h.)  The building will be constructed at an estimated cost of $2.8
 million, financed by tax-free bonds.
 
     IBHS is a national non-profit initiative of the insurance industry to
 reduce deaths, injuries, property damage, economic losses and human suffering
 caused by natural disasters.
 
     MOSI is the largest science center in the Southeastern United States and
 home of the only IMAX Dome Theatre in Florida.  The National Center for
 Natural Disaster Safety is part of a five-year, $37 million expansion that
 will make it the largest children's science center in the country, and will
 include a charter school, and the renovation of existing "minds-on"
 interactive exhibits.
 
 SOURCE  Institute for Business & Home Safety