Indoor Air Pollution Can be Worse than Outdoor

Apr 12, 2001, 01:00 ET from Research Products Corporation

    MADISON, Wis., April 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Air pollution can be worse inside
 your home than outdoors, according to government studies.  Now, a survey
 conducted by the Aprilaire(R) Center for Indoor Air Comfort shows Americans
 are becoming concerned about the dirty air in their homes.
     "Nearly two-thirds of U.S. homeowners surveyed said they are very
 concerned or somewhat concerned about indoor air pollution," said Sean
 McCarthy, Director of the Aprilaire Center for Indoor Air Comfort.
     Government studies have found that levels of some pollutants like volatile
 organic compounds, or VOCs, are up to five times higher indoors than outside,
 according to McCarthy.  These organic chemicals are a main cause of indoor air
 pollution, and can cause health effects ranging from headaches to organ
 damage.  Some are suspected of causing cancer.
     "The problem of indoor air pollution is more prevalent, in part, because
 new homes are built tight to keep outside air out," McCarthy said.  "But, no
 matter what type of home you live in, we recommend taking steps to reduce your
 exposure to indoor pollution."
     -- Store household cleaners, chemicals and paints in tight containers; if
        possible keep them outdoors.
     -- Reduce the use of products like spray deodorants, hair sprays, air
        fresheners, household cleaners and some paints that include VOCs.
     -- Don't allow smoking indoors, and properly vent all gas or wood burning
        appliances.
     -- Make sure your home has proper ventilation.  In mild climates, exhaust
        fans and fresh air dampers can help dilute indoor air pollution.  In
        hot or cold climates, an energy recovery ventilator can help save
        energy costs while maintaining proper air intake and exhaust.
 
     "Nearly half of our survey respondents told us they use an exhaust fan to
 help keep indoor pollution to a minimum.  And 17 percent say they use an
 energy recovery ventilator."
     Energy recovery ventilators or ERVs, use a home's existing heating or air
 conditioning duct system to distribute fresh air throughout the house.  In
 winter, the fresh air exchanger warms the incoming fresh air.  In warm weather
 months, it cools the incoming air and removes excess moisture so the air
 conditioner doesn't have to work so hard.
     For more information about how energy recovery ventilators can help reduce
 harmful indoor pollutants, visit http://www.aprilaire.com
 
 

SOURCE Research Products Corporation
    MADISON, Wis., April 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Air pollution can be worse inside
 your home than outdoors, according to government studies.  Now, a survey
 conducted by the Aprilaire(R) Center for Indoor Air Comfort shows Americans
 are becoming concerned about the dirty air in their homes.
     "Nearly two-thirds of U.S. homeowners surveyed said they are very
 concerned or somewhat concerned about indoor air pollution," said Sean
 McCarthy, Director of the Aprilaire Center for Indoor Air Comfort.
     Government studies have found that levels of some pollutants like volatile
 organic compounds, or VOCs, are up to five times higher indoors than outside,
 according to McCarthy.  These organic chemicals are a main cause of indoor air
 pollution, and can cause health effects ranging from headaches to organ
 damage.  Some are suspected of causing cancer.
     "The problem of indoor air pollution is more prevalent, in part, because
 new homes are built tight to keep outside air out," McCarthy said.  "But, no
 matter what type of home you live in, we recommend taking steps to reduce your
 exposure to indoor pollution."
     -- Store household cleaners, chemicals and paints in tight containers; if
        possible keep them outdoors.
     -- Reduce the use of products like spray deodorants, hair sprays, air
        fresheners, household cleaners and some paints that include VOCs.
     -- Don't allow smoking indoors, and properly vent all gas or wood burning
        appliances.
     -- Make sure your home has proper ventilation.  In mild climates, exhaust
        fans and fresh air dampers can help dilute indoor air pollution.  In
        hot or cold climates, an energy recovery ventilator can help save
        energy costs while maintaining proper air intake and exhaust.
 
     "Nearly half of our survey respondents told us they use an exhaust fan to
 help keep indoor pollution to a minimum.  And 17 percent say they use an
 energy recovery ventilator."
     Energy recovery ventilators or ERVs, use a home's existing heating or air
 conditioning duct system to distribute fresh air throughout the house.  In
 winter, the fresh air exchanger warms the incoming fresh air.  In warm weather
 months, it cools the incoming air and removes excess moisture so the air
 conditioner doesn't have to work so hard.
     For more information about how energy recovery ventilators can help reduce
 harmful indoor pollutants, visit http://www.aprilaire.com
 
 SOURCE  Research Products Corporation