International and Asia Highlights and Exclusives/April 30, 2001 Issue

Apr 22, 2001, 01:00 ET from Newsweek

    NEW YORK, April 22 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- Cover: "The
 Next Frontier: Business and Technology" (All editions). While the economy may
 be uncertain and dot-coms come and go, technological advancements are creating
 new fields, new gadgets, new ways of doing business and whole new fields of
 employment. The first installment of our special four-part series focuses on
 how cutting edge technologies and inventions will transform the way we work
 and live.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010422/NEWSWEEK )
     A New Brand of Tech Cities. We name nine hot tech cities which have built
 their new economies with hard work and innovation: Oakland, California; Akron,
 Ohio; Huntsville, Alabama; Tulsa, Oklahoma; Omaha, Nebraska; Campina Grande,
 Brazil; Barcelona, Spain; Suzhou, China; and Cote d'Azur, France.
     Your Next ... We preview the next wave of gadgets that will facilitate the
 work experience and even take it out of the office building including credit
 card-like passports that are swiped at customs checkpoints while a camera
 scans the traveler's iris to ensure exact identity, and a do-it-all computer
 "tablet" that goes anywhere and is as friendly as a piece of paper.
 
     A Bank Job In a Battle Zone. Last week, 400 NATO troops destroyed Bosnia's
 leading private bank during a raid to seize records that could prove that
 militant Croat secessionists were using the institution to launder money for
 their cause. Now the fear is that NATO's heavy-handed intervention could
 actually drive many moderate Croats into supporting the separatists, and the
 deepening mess has raised questions about the basic strategy -- or lack of
 one -- of NATO's "stabilization force," reports Chief Diplomatic Correspondent
 Roy Gutman.
 
     'Putin Will Get Away With It.' Continuing the crackdown on the free press
 that started with the seizure of Russia's only independent national TV
 channel, NTV, supporters of Russian President Vladimir Putin took control of
 Itogi, firing the editorial team that gave the news magazine its powerful
 dissenting voice and installing a handpicked staff. In a guest essay, Masha
 Lipman, a co-creator of Itogi, describes what it is like to be making news
 instead of covering it and to be left telling readers "Itogi is wherever we
 are," while having no place to go.
 
     A Victory - and a New War. HIV-positive crusader Zackie Achmat cheers the
 moment last week when major drug companies dropped their suit against the
 South African government, paving the way for cheap generic drugs that could
 convert HIV/AIDS from a fatal condition to a chronic, though manageable
 disease in his country. But the guest essayist writes that South Africa still
 faces the challenge of developing a treatment plan to fight the disease that
 is ravaging the nation.
 
     Plight of the 'Child Slaves.' When a suspected "child slave" ship turned
 up in Benin empty of children, some were embarrassed about sounding an
 apparently false alarm. But the clamor over the incident proves at least
 someone was watching, and points up how publicity about the plight of child
 workers has begun to disrupt the very real trade in children, reports Africa
 Regional Editor Tom Masland.
 
     Basketball Diplomacy. The U.S. and China aren't only bickering about spy
 planes. There's another tricky relationship involving Yao Ming, a 7'5"
 basketball sensation who the NBA wants to pluck out of Shanghai as a possible
 No. 1 pick in its June draft. Chinese sports officials are demanding some
 "off-the-wall" conditions as they negotiate a deal that "could turn into a
 public-relations nightmare for the Chinese just as easily as it could show how
 much China is changing," one U.S. sports executive tells Hong Kong Bureau
 Chief Brook Larmer.
 
     The Dark Tourists. Foreigners are taking advantage of Costa Rica's
 anything-goes moral climate to seek out child prostitutes, reports Miami
 Bureau Chief Joseph Contreras. Children's rights activists accuse the Costa
 Rican government of trying to downplay the sexual exploitation of children in
 order to preserve a robust tourism industry, while some in power suggest the
 crusaders are exaggerating the problem in order to generate publicity and
 fresh funding.
 
     Out of the Box. Billionaire media baron Michael Bloomberg, who has yet to
 officially announce his candidacy for New York City mayor, said that if he
 should get the job, he won't take more than $1 a year in salary, reports
 National Correspondent Matt Bai. He also says he won't accept any campaign
 contributions or spend a penny in public matching funds, but would instead use
 a considerable chunk of his own fortune -- as much as $20 million by some
 estimates.
 
     Ashcroft's PR Offensive. Wounded by the harshness of his confirmation
 battle, Attorney General John Ashcroft has spent a lot of time lately making
 nice with his enemies, particularly African-Americans. Despite the PR
 campaign, inside the Justice Department Ashcroft has done little to mask his
 unapologetically conservative politics, reports Investigative Correspondent
 Michael Isikoff.
 
     In the Clouds of Everest. Top mountaineers have set out from base camps on
 Mount Everest seeking answers to a puzzle that has nagged climbing enthusiasts
 since 1924; Could George Mallory and Andrew Irvine have been the first to
 reach the summit before vanishing into their snowy graves? Special
 Correspondent Tara Pepper reports that some would just as soon the explorers
 stay home, since their leader sold gruesome photos of Mallory's frozen,
 sun-bleached body to the press taken when the team first located his corpse.
 
     INTERVIEW: Mario Cabello, Bay of Pigs Veteran. One of five members of the
 doomed U.S.-equipped Brigade 2506 to accept invitations to a symposium in Cuba
 on the failed CIA-sponsored Bay of Pigs invasion, Cabello was surprised to be
 greeted with respect in Cuba. He told Miami Bureau Chief Joseph Contreras: "No
 one used humiliating words like 'mercenary' to describe us. That was important
 for me ... I always hated being called a mercenary or a tool of the United
 States ... I considered myself a guy who was fighting against a Communist
 takeover."
 
     WORLDVIEW. The New Face of the Left. The anti-globalization protesters in
 Quebec City seek not to win a rational debate, but to gain the world's
 attention and scare its governments, and they have succeeded once again,
 writes NEWSWEEK INTERNATIONAL Editor Fareed Zakaria. We will now hear more
 calls from frightened free-traders for "dialogue," "cooperation" and the
 development of a "new framework" for trade, all code words for retreat and
 protectionism, which will only slow down growth and keep the third world
 firmly mired in poverty.
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X04431963
 
 

SOURCE Newsweek
    NEW YORK, April 22 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- Cover: "The
 Next Frontier: Business and Technology" (All editions). While the economy may
 be uncertain and dot-coms come and go, technological advancements are creating
 new fields, new gadgets, new ways of doing business and whole new fields of
 employment. The first installment of our special four-part series focuses on
 how cutting edge technologies and inventions will transform the way we work
 and live.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010422/NEWSWEEK )
     A New Brand of Tech Cities. We name nine hot tech cities which have built
 their new economies with hard work and innovation: Oakland, California; Akron,
 Ohio; Huntsville, Alabama; Tulsa, Oklahoma; Omaha, Nebraska; Campina Grande,
 Brazil; Barcelona, Spain; Suzhou, China; and Cote d'Azur, France.
     Your Next ... We preview the next wave of gadgets that will facilitate the
 work experience and even take it out of the office building including credit
 card-like passports that are swiped at customs checkpoints while a camera
 scans the traveler's iris to ensure exact identity, and a do-it-all computer
 "tablet" that goes anywhere and is as friendly as a piece of paper.
 
     A Bank Job In a Battle Zone. Last week, 400 NATO troops destroyed Bosnia's
 leading private bank during a raid to seize records that could prove that
 militant Croat secessionists were using the institution to launder money for
 their cause. Now the fear is that NATO's heavy-handed intervention could
 actually drive many moderate Croats into supporting the separatists, and the
 deepening mess has raised questions about the basic strategy -- or lack of
 one -- of NATO's "stabilization force," reports Chief Diplomatic Correspondent
 Roy Gutman.
 
     'Putin Will Get Away With It.' Continuing the crackdown on the free press
 that started with the seizure of Russia's only independent national TV
 channel, NTV, supporters of Russian President Vladimir Putin took control of
 Itogi, firing the editorial team that gave the news magazine its powerful
 dissenting voice and installing a handpicked staff. In a guest essay, Masha
 Lipman, a co-creator of Itogi, describes what it is like to be making news
 instead of covering it and to be left telling readers "Itogi is wherever we
 are," while having no place to go.
 
     A Victory - and a New War. HIV-positive crusader Zackie Achmat cheers the
 moment last week when major drug companies dropped their suit against the
 South African government, paving the way for cheap generic drugs that could
 convert HIV/AIDS from a fatal condition to a chronic, though manageable
 disease in his country. But the guest essayist writes that South Africa still
 faces the challenge of developing a treatment plan to fight the disease that
 is ravaging the nation.
 
     Plight of the 'Child Slaves.' When a suspected "child slave" ship turned
 up in Benin empty of children, some were embarrassed about sounding an
 apparently false alarm. But the clamor over the incident proves at least
 someone was watching, and points up how publicity about the plight of child
 workers has begun to disrupt the very real trade in children, reports Africa
 Regional Editor Tom Masland.
 
     Basketball Diplomacy. The U.S. and China aren't only bickering about spy
 planes. There's another tricky relationship involving Yao Ming, a 7'5"
 basketball sensation who the NBA wants to pluck out of Shanghai as a possible
 No. 1 pick in its June draft. Chinese sports officials are demanding some
 "off-the-wall" conditions as they negotiate a deal that "could turn into a
 public-relations nightmare for the Chinese just as easily as it could show how
 much China is changing," one U.S. sports executive tells Hong Kong Bureau
 Chief Brook Larmer.
 
     The Dark Tourists. Foreigners are taking advantage of Costa Rica's
 anything-goes moral climate to seek out child prostitutes, reports Miami
 Bureau Chief Joseph Contreras. Children's rights activists accuse the Costa
 Rican government of trying to downplay the sexual exploitation of children in
 order to preserve a robust tourism industry, while some in power suggest the
 crusaders are exaggerating the problem in order to generate publicity and
 fresh funding.
 
     Out of the Box. Billionaire media baron Michael Bloomberg, who has yet to
 officially announce his candidacy for New York City mayor, said that if he
 should get the job, he won't take more than $1 a year in salary, reports
 National Correspondent Matt Bai. He also says he won't accept any campaign
 contributions or spend a penny in public matching funds, but would instead use
 a considerable chunk of his own fortune -- as much as $20 million by some
 estimates.
 
     Ashcroft's PR Offensive. Wounded by the harshness of his confirmation
 battle, Attorney General John Ashcroft has spent a lot of time lately making
 nice with his enemies, particularly African-Americans. Despite the PR
 campaign, inside the Justice Department Ashcroft has done little to mask his
 unapologetically conservative politics, reports Investigative Correspondent
 Michael Isikoff.
 
     In the Clouds of Everest. Top mountaineers have set out from base camps on
 Mount Everest seeking answers to a puzzle that has nagged climbing enthusiasts
 since 1924; Could George Mallory and Andrew Irvine have been the first to
 reach the summit before vanishing into their snowy graves? Special
 Correspondent Tara Pepper reports that some would just as soon the explorers
 stay home, since their leader sold gruesome photos of Mallory's frozen,
 sun-bleached body to the press taken when the team first located his corpse.
 
     INTERVIEW: Mario Cabello, Bay of Pigs Veteran. One of five members of the
 doomed U.S.-equipped Brigade 2506 to accept invitations to a symposium in Cuba
 on the failed CIA-sponsored Bay of Pigs invasion, Cabello was surprised to be
 greeted with respect in Cuba. He told Miami Bureau Chief Joseph Contreras: "No
 one used humiliating words like 'mercenary' to describe us. That was important
 for me ... I always hated being called a mercenary or a tool of the United
 States ... I considered myself a guy who was fighting against a Communist
 takeover."
 
     WORLDVIEW. The New Face of the Left. The anti-globalization protesters in
 Quebec City seek not to win a rational debate, but to gain the world's
 attention and scare its governments, and they have succeeded once again,
 writes NEWSWEEK INTERNATIONAL Editor Fareed Zakaria. We will now hear more
 calls from frightened free-traders for "dialogue," "cooperation" and the
 development of a "new framework" for trade, all code words for retreat and
 protectionism, which will only slow down growth and keep the third world
 firmly mired in poverty.
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X04431963
 
 SOURCE  Newsweek