International and Asia Highlights and Exclusives/April 9, 2001 Issue

COVER: Slobo's Last Stand (Atlantic edition). Former Yugoslav leader

Slobodan Milosevic surrendered to Serbian police after a 26-hour standoff

Apr 01, 2001, 00:00 ET from Newsweek

during which he brandished a gun and threatened to turn it on himself and
 his family. Correspondent-at-Large Rod Nordland reports that the former Serb
 strong man now faces charges of corruption and abuse of power, but there are
 no Yugoslav government investigations of war crimes underway.
     His Willing Executioners. General Editor Michael Meyer reports that
 regardless of the charges brought against Milosevic, the real question now
 is to what extent do the Serbs under him share his crimes, and to what
 extent are they ignorant of them.
    (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010331/HSSA009 )
 
     COVER: Korea Envy (Pacific edition). After years of disdain, Japanese have
 begun to envy the cool of Korea, report Special Correspondents Hideko
 Takayama and Kay Itoi. Korean movies and music fill the Japanese charts.
 Seoul now beats out London and New York as tourists' top vacation spot. And
 the Japanese are jealously watching how the tech revolution, stalled in
 Japan, has transformed the Korean economy. "Japan envies a South Korea that
 can change and is changing, even though Japan doesn't want to change, and
 can't," Kobe University professor Kan Kimura said.
 
     COVER: Americans in Sudan (Africa edition). Motivated by a mission to end
 persecution of black Christians by Sudan's Islamic dictatorship, America's
 religious right has launched its own relief operations to aid Sudanese
 rebels, reports Africa Regional Editor Tom Masland. And after fierce
 lobbying, this important constituency now has the attention of President
 George W. Bush, who has agreed to rethink U.S. policy toward Sudan and
 contemplate a major peacemaking initiative.
     INTERVIEW: John Garang, the Sudanese People's Liberation Army
 leader.  Garang tells Masland that the 18-year conflict in Sudan is not only
 about religion: "There are religious elements, historical elements, cultural
 elements, ... economic elements to it. Actually, the economic aspect
 concerning oil is begging to take prominence. In the end of the day, it is a
 struggle for the definition of the Sudan."
     A Place on the Map. President Bush pilloried former president Bill
 Clinton for squandering American resources in remote lands, but now that he
 has discovered Sudan, the question is what can he really do to stop the
 carnage, writes Chief Diplomatic Correspondent Roy Gutman.
 
     Microsoft Cops. In a campaign that has gone virtually unnoticed, even in
 the software industry, Microsoft is building an unrivalled force of in-house
 police and prosecutorial muscle to combat global piracy of its products by
 organized crime, reports London Bureau Chief Stryker McGuire. The effort,
 which has so far had only limited success, pits Microsoft versus Mafias and
 gangsters from Poland to Hong Kong.
 
     Her Name Was Aida. Israeli intelligence sources believe that Force 17, an
 elite Palestinian security outfit, is operating in tandem with Hamas
 demolitions experts to set up roadside bombs around Jerusalem and Ramallah,
 reports Jerusalem Bureau Chief Joshua Hammer. However, a Force 17 commander
 in Ramallah with the nom de guerre Nasir denied his group has any links to
 the Islamic terrorist group.
     INTERVIEW: Hosni Mubarak, Egyptian President.  Mubarak tells
 Contributing Editor Lally Weymouth that he is "working with the Americans to
 find a way to resume negotiations" between the Israelis and the
 Palestinians, as violence rages there daily. "I am encouraging [Palestinian
 leader Yasir] Arafat to continue negotiations," he said.
 
     The Minister Who Would Be Czar. Argentina's economic czar Domingo Cavallo
 is riding a tidal wave of popularity as he settles back into a job he did
 brilliantly ten years ago. But since Cavallo failed to acquire the sweeping
 powers he wielded under the last president, some wonder whether he will have
 the ability to steer Argentina out of its terrible recession, reports
 Special Correspondent Peter Hudson.
 
     McVeigh's Death Wish. In a controversial new book by Buffalo News
 reporters Lou Michel and Dan Herbeck, a chillingly unrepentant Timothy McVeigh
 details his bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Building in Oklahoma City, an
 attack which killed 168 people, including 19 children, reports Senior Editor
 Russell Watson. Dismissing the dead children as "collateral damage," McVeigh
 insists: "It was my choice ... to hit that building when it was full. I did it
 for the larger good."
 
     Foot and Mouth Wars. As foot-and-mouth disease rages in Europe, scientists
 are still years away from developing the ultimate vaccine, despite nearly 50
 years of trying, reports Special Correspondent Adam Piore. While security is
 extreme, some feel it is only a matter of time before the virus invades
 American farms.
 
    Love Those Wearables. Companies like IBM, Philips, Levi Strauss and Nike
 are putting miniature computers into everything from wristwatches to running
 shoes, reports Special Correspondent Stefan Theil. While some will wonder
 what to do with all this technology, 40 percent of adults and 75 percent of
 teens are expected to embrace wearable gadgets by 2010.
 
     INTERVIEW: Peter Scarlet, Cinematheque Francaise.  The new directory of
 the film repository tells Special Correspondent Scott Johnson that American
 movies lack the resonance of French films. "Culture isn't a dirty word in
 France the way it is in America," Scarlet said. "Sophistication and irony,
 according to Hollywood prescriptions, died at the box office yesterday."
 
     WORLD VIEW: The Middle East After Arafat: By refusing to give up an
 unattainable dream and accept a reduced reality, Palestinian leader Yasir
 Arafat has retained his hold on Arab hearts and minds, but in a broader
 sense, his inability to compromise makes him increasingly a marginal figure,
 writes Editor Fareed Zakaria.
 
 

SOURCE Newsweek
during which he brandished a gun and threatened to turn it on himself and
 his family. Correspondent-at-Large Rod Nordland reports that the former Serb
 strong man now faces charges of corruption and abuse of power, but there are
 no Yugoslav government investigations of war crimes underway.
     His Willing Executioners. General Editor Michael Meyer reports that
 regardless of the charges brought against Milosevic, the real question now
 is to what extent do the Serbs under him share his crimes, and to what
 extent are they ignorant of them.
    (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010331/HSSA009 )
 
     COVER: Korea Envy (Pacific edition). After years of disdain, Japanese have
 begun to envy the cool of Korea, report Special Correspondents Hideko
 Takayama and Kay Itoi. Korean movies and music fill the Japanese charts.
 Seoul now beats out London and New York as tourists' top vacation spot. And
 the Japanese are jealously watching how the tech revolution, stalled in
 Japan, has transformed the Korean economy. "Japan envies a South Korea that
 can change and is changing, even though Japan doesn't want to change, and
 can't," Kobe University professor Kan Kimura said.
 
     COVER: Americans in Sudan (Africa edition). Motivated by a mission to end
 persecution of black Christians by Sudan's Islamic dictatorship, America's
 religious right has launched its own relief operations to aid Sudanese
 rebels, reports Africa Regional Editor Tom Masland. And after fierce
 lobbying, this important constituency now has the attention of President
 George W. Bush, who has agreed to rethink U.S. policy toward Sudan and
 contemplate a major peacemaking initiative.
     INTERVIEW: John Garang, the Sudanese People's Liberation Army
 leader.  Garang tells Masland that the 18-year conflict in Sudan is not only
 about religion: "There are religious elements, historical elements, cultural
 elements, ... economic elements to it. Actually, the economic aspect
 concerning oil is begging to take prominence. In the end of the day, it is a
 struggle for the definition of the Sudan."
     A Place on the Map. President Bush pilloried former president Bill
 Clinton for squandering American resources in remote lands, but now that he
 has discovered Sudan, the question is what can he really do to stop the
 carnage, writes Chief Diplomatic Correspondent Roy Gutman.
 
     Microsoft Cops. In a campaign that has gone virtually unnoticed, even in
 the software industry, Microsoft is building an unrivalled force of in-house
 police and prosecutorial muscle to combat global piracy of its products by
 organized crime, reports London Bureau Chief Stryker McGuire. The effort,
 which has so far had only limited success, pits Microsoft versus Mafias and
 gangsters from Poland to Hong Kong.
 
     Her Name Was Aida. Israeli intelligence sources believe that Force 17, an
 elite Palestinian security outfit, is operating in tandem with Hamas
 demolitions experts to set up roadside bombs around Jerusalem and Ramallah,
 reports Jerusalem Bureau Chief Joshua Hammer. However, a Force 17 commander
 in Ramallah with the nom de guerre Nasir denied his group has any links to
 the Islamic terrorist group.
     INTERVIEW: Hosni Mubarak, Egyptian President.  Mubarak tells
 Contributing Editor Lally Weymouth that he is "working with the Americans to
 find a way to resume negotiations" between the Israelis and the
 Palestinians, as violence rages there daily. "I am encouraging [Palestinian
 leader Yasir] Arafat to continue negotiations," he said.
 
     The Minister Who Would Be Czar. Argentina's economic czar Domingo Cavallo
 is riding a tidal wave of popularity as he settles back into a job he did
 brilliantly ten years ago. But since Cavallo failed to acquire the sweeping
 powers he wielded under the last president, some wonder whether he will have
 the ability to steer Argentina out of its terrible recession, reports
 Special Correspondent Peter Hudson.
 
     McVeigh's Death Wish. In a controversial new book by Buffalo News
 reporters Lou Michel and Dan Herbeck, a chillingly unrepentant Timothy McVeigh
 details his bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Building in Oklahoma City, an
 attack which killed 168 people, including 19 children, reports Senior Editor
 Russell Watson. Dismissing the dead children as "collateral damage," McVeigh
 insists: "It was my choice ... to hit that building when it was full. I did it
 for the larger good."
 
     Foot and Mouth Wars. As foot-and-mouth disease rages in Europe, scientists
 are still years away from developing the ultimate vaccine, despite nearly 50
 years of trying, reports Special Correspondent Adam Piore. While security is
 extreme, some feel it is only a matter of time before the virus invades
 American farms.
 
    Love Those Wearables. Companies like IBM, Philips, Levi Strauss and Nike
 are putting miniature computers into everything from wristwatches to running
 shoes, reports Special Correspondent Stefan Theil. While some will wonder
 what to do with all this technology, 40 percent of adults and 75 percent of
 teens are expected to embrace wearable gadgets by 2010.
 
     INTERVIEW: Peter Scarlet, Cinematheque Francaise.  The new directory of
 the film repository tells Special Correspondent Scott Johnson that American
 movies lack the resonance of French films. "Culture isn't a dirty word in
 France the way it is in America," Scarlet said. "Sophistication and irony,
 according to Hollywood prescriptions, died at the box office yesterday."
 
     WORLD VIEW: The Middle East After Arafat: By refusing to give up an
 unattainable dream and accept a reduced reality, Palestinian leader Yasir
 Arafat has retained his hold on Arab hearts and minds, but in a broader
 sense, his inability to compromise makes him increasingly a marginal figure,
 writes Editor Fareed Zakaria.
 
 SOURCE  Newsweek