Internet to Transform Japanese Economy: E-Book by Japan Expert Offers Look At Future of Japanese E-Commerce

Apr 04, 2001, 01:00 ET from Coudert Brothers

    NEW YORK, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- Japanese e-commerce could top
 $745 billion in B-2-C and B-2-B transactions by the year 2003, says Arthur
 Mitchell, Japan expert and partner with the multinational law firm Coudert
 Brothers, one of the far-reaching conclusions in his new e-book, "How the
 Internet will Change Japan: Lessons from Silicon Alley," now available at
 http://www.coudert.com/practice/ebook/ebook.htm.
     Mitchell, who frequently writes about and is quoted on Japanese business
 topics, is the former private secretary to Masayoshi Ohira, one of Japan's
 Prime Ministers.  In his new work, Mitchell predicts that the Internet,
 combined with current reforms of the Japanese legal system, positive public
 policy toward the Internet, and new opportunities for entrepreneurial activity
 will transform Japan's economy.  Says Mitchell, "During two previous
 'revolutions' in Japan -- the Meiji Restoration and Occupation after World
 War II -- the existing leadership class was toppled from above.  As removal by
 force is inconceivable in a constitutional democracy such as Japan, the
 current occupiers of power and those who obstruct reform must be removed by a
 revolution from below.  For this, the Internet may prove to be a perfect
 tool."
     The book, which includes a series of interviews with top executives from
 Silicon Alley, including Erik Rydholm, The Motley Fool founder, Henry Nasella
 of Online Retail Partners LLC, Stuart Woodring of Forrester Research, Barbara
 Coffey of iVillage, Steven Umlauf formerly of Morgan Stanley Japan, Ltd.
 provides useful insights and views on building a successful Internet business.
 Ideas from these business leaders as well as Mitchell's understanding of
 Japan's current business climate make this a solid learning tool for Japanese
 Internet executives as well as International companies interested in
 developing e-businesses in Japan.
     "We are beginning to witness the Internet's influence in Japan in very
 subtle ways," says Mitchell.  "In the summer of 2000, a spontaneous boycott of
 the Sogo Department Store was 'organized' over the Net when Japanese
 housewives came to realize that taxpayer money would be used to rescue the
 failed retail chain.  The movement forced the Japanese government to abandon
 its plans."
     Arthur M. Mitchell is a Partner and head of the Japan Practice Group at
 Coudert Brothers, an international law firm based in New York.  Mr. Mitchell
 has dealt with matters related to Japan for over thirty-four years.  He has
 lived and worked in Japan for over ten years.  While there, he studied
 Japanese politics at the International Christian University and Japanese law
 at Kyoto University, under a Japanese Ministry of Education grant.
     Coudert Brothers is a multinational law firm dedicated to providing legal
 advice on international business transactions and dispute resolution in all
 major business centers around the world.  Through the network of 27 offices in
 North America, Europe, Asia and Australia, Coudert Brothers represents clients
 in their investment and commercial transactions on a global basis.
 
 

SOURCE Coudert Brothers
    NEW YORK, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- Japanese e-commerce could top
 $745 billion in B-2-C and B-2-B transactions by the year 2003, says Arthur
 Mitchell, Japan expert and partner with the multinational law firm Coudert
 Brothers, one of the far-reaching conclusions in his new e-book, "How the
 Internet will Change Japan: Lessons from Silicon Alley," now available at
 http://www.coudert.com/practice/ebook/ebook.htm.
     Mitchell, who frequently writes about and is quoted on Japanese business
 topics, is the former private secretary to Masayoshi Ohira, one of Japan's
 Prime Ministers.  In his new work, Mitchell predicts that the Internet,
 combined with current reforms of the Japanese legal system, positive public
 policy toward the Internet, and new opportunities for entrepreneurial activity
 will transform Japan's economy.  Says Mitchell, "During two previous
 'revolutions' in Japan -- the Meiji Restoration and Occupation after World
 War II -- the existing leadership class was toppled from above.  As removal by
 force is inconceivable in a constitutional democracy such as Japan, the
 current occupiers of power and those who obstruct reform must be removed by a
 revolution from below.  For this, the Internet may prove to be a perfect
 tool."
     The book, which includes a series of interviews with top executives from
 Silicon Alley, including Erik Rydholm, The Motley Fool founder, Henry Nasella
 of Online Retail Partners LLC, Stuart Woodring of Forrester Research, Barbara
 Coffey of iVillage, Steven Umlauf formerly of Morgan Stanley Japan, Ltd.
 provides useful insights and views on building a successful Internet business.
 Ideas from these business leaders as well as Mitchell's understanding of
 Japan's current business climate make this a solid learning tool for Japanese
 Internet executives as well as International companies interested in
 developing e-businesses in Japan.
     "We are beginning to witness the Internet's influence in Japan in very
 subtle ways," says Mitchell.  "In the summer of 2000, a spontaneous boycott of
 the Sogo Department Store was 'organized' over the Net when Japanese
 housewives came to realize that taxpayer money would be used to rescue the
 failed retail chain.  The movement forced the Japanese government to abandon
 its plans."
     Arthur M. Mitchell is a Partner and head of the Japan Practice Group at
 Coudert Brothers, an international law firm based in New York.  Mr. Mitchell
 has dealt with matters related to Japan for over thirty-four years.  He has
 lived and worked in Japan for over ten years.  While there, he studied
 Japanese politics at the International Christian University and Japanese law
 at Kyoto University, under a Japanese Ministry of Education grant.
     Coudert Brothers is a multinational law firm dedicated to providing legal
 advice on international business transactions and dispute resolution in all
 major business centers around the world.  Through the network of 27 offices in
 North America, Europe, Asia and Australia, Coudert Brothers represents clients
 in their investment and commercial transactions on a global basis.
 
 SOURCE  Coudert Brothers