Jancentral.Com Announces the Ultimate Victory of Vacuum Cleaners

Apr 17, 2001, 01:00 ET from Jancentral.Com

    NEW YORK, April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Robert Kravitz, JanSan industry
 speaker, writer, and VP at janCentral.com ( http://www.jancentral.com ), was
 recently highlighted in the New York Times on his History of Vacuum Cleaners
 lecture.  The half page article covered Mr. Kravitz's "obsession" with vacuum
 cleaners and referred to him as America's "foremost historian on vacuum
 cleaners."
     The article points out how Kravitz has been invited to speak around the
 country on the subject.  Though this may seem an unusual, even dry topic, with
 over 100 images and photos, he presents the history of vacuum cleaners, their
 early inventors and creators, in a lively, fun and entertaining manner.
     By Kravitz's estimation, vacuum cleaners rank among the most important
 inventions of the century.  "If you think back, 100 or more years ago, people
 would have two, three or more servants helping them to keep their homes clean.
 Those days are long gone.  How could we manage now without vacuum cleaners?"
 Kravitz says.
     The talk starts with a discussion of how we cleaned carpets 150 years ago.
 He describes how the early machines were coal powered "blowers," which
 actually would blow on carpets to clean them.  About 1870, an English
 inventor, Hubert Booth, realized that blowing was not the way to go but
 suction was.  He discovered this by placing a handkerchief between his mouth
 and a velvet couch and breathed in.  Kravitz refers to this as the "Great
 Inhale!"  When he lifted the cloth, he found a film of dirt on the other side
 of the handkerchief.
     From that day on, the vacuum cleaner industry took off.  According to
 Kravitz, "Vacuum cleaner companies were the high-tech companies of their day,
 the Sun Microsystems and Microsoft's."  In order to win market share, vacuum
 cleaners eventually did more than just clean carpets.  Later inventions had
 vacuum cleaners that could sharpen knives and even give massages.
     Marketing indeed became the name of the game.  Hoover, sensing an
 opportunity, cut a deal with the "I Love Lucy" show to have one of its vacuums
 displayed whenever anyone on the show was seen vacuuming.  It was early
 televisions first such marketing agreement.
     Kravitz talk concludes with his vacuum cleaner predictions. According to
 Kravitz, vacuum cleaners will be cordless and be worn on our backs. Backpack
 models are already available.
 
     CONTACT:  Robert Kravitz of Jancentral.Com, 212-643-4310, ext., 134, or
               rkravitz@janCentral.com
 
     This release was issued through  DigitalWork -- The Leader in Enabling
 eServices.  For more information visit:  http://www.digitalwork.com .
 
 

SOURCE Jancentral.Com
    NEW YORK, April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Robert Kravitz, JanSan industry
 speaker, writer, and VP at janCentral.com ( http://www.jancentral.com ), was
 recently highlighted in the New York Times on his History of Vacuum Cleaners
 lecture.  The half page article covered Mr. Kravitz's "obsession" with vacuum
 cleaners and referred to him as America's "foremost historian on vacuum
 cleaners."
     The article points out how Kravitz has been invited to speak around the
 country on the subject.  Though this may seem an unusual, even dry topic, with
 over 100 images and photos, he presents the history of vacuum cleaners, their
 early inventors and creators, in a lively, fun and entertaining manner.
     By Kravitz's estimation, vacuum cleaners rank among the most important
 inventions of the century.  "If you think back, 100 or more years ago, people
 would have two, three or more servants helping them to keep their homes clean.
 Those days are long gone.  How could we manage now without vacuum cleaners?"
 Kravitz says.
     The talk starts with a discussion of how we cleaned carpets 150 years ago.
 He describes how the early machines were coal powered "blowers," which
 actually would blow on carpets to clean them.  About 1870, an English
 inventor, Hubert Booth, realized that blowing was not the way to go but
 suction was.  He discovered this by placing a handkerchief between his mouth
 and a velvet couch and breathed in.  Kravitz refers to this as the "Great
 Inhale!"  When he lifted the cloth, he found a film of dirt on the other side
 of the handkerchief.
     From that day on, the vacuum cleaner industry took off.  According to
 Kravitz, "Vacuum cleaner companies were the high-tech companies of their day,
 the Sun Microsystems and Microsoft's."  In order to win market share, vacuum
 cleaners eventually did more than just clean carpets.  Later inventions had
 vacuum cleaners that could sharpen knives and even give massages.
     Marketing indeed became the name of the game.  Hoover, sensing an
 opportunity, cut a deal with the "I Love Lucy" show to have one of its vacuums
 displayed whenever anyone on the show was seen vacuuming.  It was early
 televisions first such marketing agreement.
     Kravitz talk concludes with his vacuum cleaner predictions. According to
 Kravitz, vacuum cleaners will be cordless and be worn on our backs. Backpack
 models are already available.
 
     CONTACT:  Robert Kravitz of Jancentral.Com, 212-643-4310, ext., 134, or
               rkravitz@janCentral.com
 
     This release was issued through  DigitalWork -- The Leader in Enabling
 eServices.  For more information visit:  http://www.digitalwork.com .
 
 SOURCE  Jancentral.Com