Lear Corp. Has the All-New Jeep(R) Liberty Wired

Apr 30, 2001, 01:00 ET from Lear Corporation

    DEARBORN, Mich., April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- When it came to working with the
 Chrysler Group on the all-new Jeep(R) Liberty, Lear Corporation's (NYSE:   LEA)
 Electronics and Electrical Division (LEED) truly lived up to its name.  LEED
 not only supplied the electrical distribution system for Jeep's newest sport-
 utility vehicle, but delivered the design specifications electronically, as
 well.
     In the past, design specifications for the jigs, form boards and fixtures
 that are used by a supplier to make the vehicle components had to be converted
 from computer-based CATIA files to drawings.  Lear's engineers would then take
 the drawings and convert them back into CATIA data.  With the Jeep Liberty,
 LEED changed all that.  Using cutting-edge design technology and working
 closely with its partners at DaimlerChrysler, Lear was able to transfer CATIA-
 based electronic files from DaimlerChrysler directly to Lear's manufacturing
 floor.  This reduced both development time and costs.
     "Design departments have transferred CATIA data for some time," said D.
 William Pumphrey, President of LEED.  "But this is the first time that CATIA
 data for an electronic component has been transferred between an OEM and a
 supplier's manufacturing facility."
     In addition to the electrical architecture, Lear provides DaimlerChrysler
 with its latest state-of-the-art 400-Micron printed circuit board junction
 box.  It is the brains of the electrical distribution system, delivering power
 when and where it's needed throughout the vehicle.
     Lear also supplies a number of interior components to the Jeep Liberty,
 including the front and rear floor carpet, throw-in mats, blow molded HVAC
 ducts and numerous acoustical insulators.  In addition, the Liberty has a
 modular overhead system provided by Lear that can result in 16 different
 iterations, depending on if the vehicle has a sunroof, side airbag, overhead
 console, or other options.  "It's the most modular overhead system we provide
 to DaimlerChrysler," said Nick Scagnoli, Lear's platform director for the Jeep
 Liberty.  Lear provides electronic, electrical and interior components on a
 wide variety of DaimlerChrysler vehicles, including the all-new 2001 Chrysler
 and Dodge minivans.
     Lear Corporation, a Fortune 150 company headquartered in Southfield,
 Mich., USA, focuses on automotive interiors and electronics and is the world's
 fifth-largest automotive supplier.  Sales in 2000 were $14.1 billion.  The
 company's world-class products are designed, engineered and manufactured by
 over 100,000 employees in more than 300 facilities located in 32 countries.
 Information about Lear and its products is available on the Internet at
 www.lear.com .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X51859859
 
 

SOURCE Lear Corporation
    DEARBORN, Mich., April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- When it came to working with the
 Chrysler Group on the all-new Jeep(R) Liberty, Lear Corporation's (NYSE:   LEA)
 Electronics and Electrical Division (LEED) truly lived up to its name.  LEED
 not only supplied the electrical distribution system for Jeep's newest sport-
 utility vehicle, but delivered the design specifications electronically, as
 well.
     In the past, design specifications for the jigs, form boards and fixtures
 that are used by a supplier to make the vehicle components had to be converted
 from computer-based CATIA files to drawings.  Lear's engineers would then take
 the drawings and convert them back into CATIA data.  With the Jeep Liberty,
 LEED changed all that.  Using cutting-edge design technology and working
 closely with its partners at DaimlerChrysler, Lear was able to transfer CATIA-
 based electronic files from DaimlerChrysler directly to Lear's manufacturing
 floor.  This reduced both development time and costs.
     "Design departments have transferred CATIA data for some time," said D.
 William Pumphrey, President of LEED.  "But this is the first time that CATIA
 data for an electronic component has been transferred between an OEM and a
 supplier's manufacturing facility."
     In addition to the electrical architecture, Lear provides DaimlerChrysler
 with its latest state-of-the-art 400-Micron printed circuit board junction
 box.  It is the brains of the electrical distribution system, delivering power
 when and where it's needed throughout the vehicle.
     Lear also supplies a number of interior components to the Jeep Liberty,
 including the front and rear floor carpet, throw-in mats, blow molded HVAC
 ducts and numerous acoustical insulators.  In addition, the Liberty has a
 modular overhead system provided by Lear that can result in 16 different
 iterations, depending on if the vehicle has a sunroof, side airbag, overhead
 console, or other options.  "It's the most modular overhead system we provide
 to DaimlerChrysler," said Nick Scagnoli, Lear's platform director for the Jeep
 Liberty.  Lear provides electronic, electrical and interior components on a
 wide variety of DaimlerChrysler vehicles, including the all-new 2001 Chrysler
 and Dodge minivans.
     Lear Corporation, a Fortune 150 company headquartered in Southfield,
 Mich., USA, focuses on automotive interiors and electronics and is the world's
 fifth-largest automotive supplier.  Sales in 2000 were $14.1 billion.  The
 company's world-class products are designed, engineered and manufactured by
 over 100,000 employees in more than 300 facilities located in 32 countries.
 Information about Lear and its products is available on the Internet at
 www.lear.com .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X51859859
 
 SOURCE  Lear Corporation